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Good Read For Hunters Worried About CWD

Old 10-10-2002, 12:02 AM
  #1  
Nontypical Buck
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Default Good Read For Hunters Worried About CWD


Posted Oct. 09, 2002

Expert: No reason to fear deer disease

Common sense best precaution during the hunt

By Ed Culhane
Post-Crescent staff writer

WAUPACA — Some politicians have abandoned common sense, the state’s leading diagnostic expert on chronic wasting disease said Tuesday night, but hunters are free to keep theirs intact.

Speaking to a gathering of about 100 hunters here, Dr. Robert Shull said there is nothing to fear about CWD other than its spread within the deer herd.

CWD in deer is like scrapie in sheep, which has been around since the 18th century without ever harming a single person.

In the meantime, Shull said, the individual tests that politicians and some hunting groups have been clamoring for are worthless since there is not a laboratory or scientist in the world who can pronounce an individual deer free of the disease.

“If I tell you a deer has CWD, it has it,” said Shull, director of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, the only facility in the state licensed to test for the disease. “But if I tell you the test comes back ‘not positive,’ that does not mean the animal does not have the disease.”

This is because a deer must be infected for up to 1½ years before clinical evidence of the disease becomes visible.

If a hunter has concerns but still wants to hunt, he said, then the best advice is to carefully field dress and butcher the deer, harvesting only the meat. The hunter can then freeze the meat and wait three to six months for the state’s comprehensive testing program this fall, which will identify any area in the state where the disease exists.

“If you hunted in an area pronounced free of the disease, and you did the proper field dressing and butchering, then ladies and gentlemen, you have the safest deer in the United States of America.”

The testing of 50,000 to 60,000 deer this fall, including the testing of 500 deer in every Wisconsin county, will be so comprehensive, he said, it will provide 99 percent statistical certainty of finding CWD if more than 1 percent of the animals are infected in any given area.

Shull said he has heard some crazy things while traveling around the state for state-sponsored meetings on CWD.

People have told him they intend to hunt in Minnesota because that state does not have CWD. But it surely does, Shull said. It just hasn’t tested for it yet. Hunters here should be proud of their state Department of Natural Resources, he said, because it was has been screening for CWD for years when neighboring states were not.

To put Wisconsin’s testing in perspective, he said, consider that in 2001, about 15,000 deer were tested nationally. In states like Colorado, where CWD has been known to exist for decades, just 2,000 to 3,000 animals are tested annually.

“Clearly, this is the most ambitious wildlife surveillance program ever attempted by any state,” he said. “You will have more information about CWD than hunters in any other state.”

Concerns about CWD infecting humans are centered on epidemiological evidence that a related disease in cattle, commonly called “mad cow disease,” infected a small percentage of people in the United Kingdom who ate animal products that included the brains and ground-up spinal tissue of cows, a now-banned butchering practice. But the disease agent, an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, is not the same in all species. The prion infecting cattle is somewhat similar in structure to human prions, but it is not similar to those that infect sheep or those that kill deer and elk.

“CWD is scrapie in deer and elk; it is not ‘mad cow disease’ in deer and elk,” he said.

Dr. Frank Hayes, a retired ophthalmologist, asked Shull whether he would serve venison from an apparently healthy Wisconsin deer to his own granddaughter.

“Yes,” Shull said.

He quoted the advice of Dr. Elizabeth Williams, his counterpart in Wyoming, where CWD has been infecting deer and elk for years. “Enjoy your hunt and enjoy your venison,” he said. “Let’s have some common sense about personal risk decisions. I say keep on hunting, Wisconsin.”

BOWFANATIC is offline  
Old 10-10-2002, 06:22 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: White Lake MI USA
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Default RE: Good Read For Hunters Worried About CWD

I read it only once and then never again, Theory is CWD is caused by food pellets with animal by produts. Thats why it hit deer farms so hard. Animal by products did cause Mad Cow

<BLOCKQUOTE id=quote<font size=1 face='Verdana, Arial, Helvetica' id=quote>quote:<hr height=1 noshade id=quote>

Posted Oct. 09, 2002

Expert: No reason to fear deer disease

Common sense best precaution during the hunt

By Ed Culhane
Post-Crescent staff writer

WAUPACA — Some politicians have abandoned common sense, the state’s leading diagnostic expert on chronic wasting disease said Tuesday night, but hunters are free to keep theirs intact.

Speaking to a gathering of about 100 hunters here, Dr. Robert Shull said there is nothing to fear about CWD other than its spread within the deer herd.

CWD in deer is like scrapie in sheep, which has been around since the 18th century without ever harming a single person.

In the meantime, Shull said, the individual tests that politicians and some hunting groups have been clamoring for are worthless since there is not a laboratory or scientist in the world who can pronounce an individual deer free of the disease.

“If I tell you a deer has CWD, it has it,” said Shull, director of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, the only facility in the state licensed to test for the disease. “But if I tell you the test comes back ‘not positive,’ that does not mean the animal does not have the disease.”

This is because a deer must be infected for up to 1½ years before clinical evidence of the disease becomes visible.

If a hunter has concerns but still wants to hunt, he said, then the best advice is to carefully field dress and butcher the deer, harvesting only the meat. The hunter can then freeze the meat and wait three to six months for the state’s comprehensive testing program this fall, which will identify any area in the state where the disease exists.

“If you hunted in an area pronounced free of the disease, and you did the proper field dressing and butchering, then ladies and gentlemen, you have the safest deer in the United States of America.”

The testing of 50,000 to 60,000 deer this fall, including the testing of 500 deer in every Wisconsin county, will be so comprehensive, he said, it will provide 99 percent statistical certainty of finding CWD if more than 1 percent of the animals are infected in any given area.

Shull said he has heard some crazy things while traveling around the state for state-sponsored meetings on CWD.

People have told him they intend to hunt in Minnesota because that state does not have CWD. But it surely does, Shull said. It just hasn’t tested for it yet. Hunters here should be proud of their state Department of Natural Resources, he said, because it was has been screening for CWD for years when neighboring states were not.

To put Wisconsin’s testing in perspective, he said, consider that in 2001, about 15,000 deer were tested nationally. In states like Colorado, where CWD has been known to exist for decades, just 2,000 to 3,000 animals are tested annually.

“Clearly, this is the most ambitious wildlife surveillance program ever attempted by any state,” he said. “You will have more information about CWD than hunters in any other state.”

Concerns about CWD infecting humans are centered on epidemiological evidence that a related disease in cattle, commonly called “mad cow disease,” infected a small percentage of people in the United Kingdom who ate animal products that included the brains and ground-up spinal tissue of cows, a now-banned butchering practice. But the disease agent, an abnormally shaped protein called a prion, is not the same in all species. The prion infecting cattle is somewhat similar in structure to human prions, but it is not similar to those that infect sheep or those that kill deer and elk.

“CWD is scrapie in deer and elk; it is not ‘mad cow disease’ in deer and elk,” he said.

Dr. Frank Hayes, a retired ophthalmologist, asked Shull whether he would serve venison from an apparently healthy Wisconsin deer to his own granddaughter.

“Yes,” Shull said.

He quoted the advice of Dr. Elizabeth Williams, his counterpart in Wyoming, where CWD has been infecting deer and elk for years. “Enjoy your hunt and enjoy your venison,” he said. “Let’s have some common sense about personal risk decisions. I say keep on hunting, Wisconsin.”


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Old 10-10-2002, 07:48 PM
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Default RE: Good Read For Hunters Worried About CWD

Welcome Dr NOdoe! or is it professor?

&quot;Nocked,cocked & ready to rock&quot;
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Old 10-10-2002, 08:02 PM
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Default RE: Good Read For Hunters Worried About CWD

Thanks for posting this BF the worst thing hunters can do with CWD is to quit hunting. That in it self would make CWD spread like wildfire, so get out and hunt. We could all be the next person to die in this world weather it be from some snipper freak ,auto wreck ,cancer, or a million other ways so dont fear CWD instead look it in the eye and have some Ketchup with your venison burger! <img src=icon_smile_big.gif border=0 align=middle>

(I can skin a buck or run a trout line)
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Old 10-11-2002, 12:56 PM
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