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Cooking

Old 11-04-2010, 06:56 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Just a fun thread to share the different and possibly unique ways of cooking different types of waterfowl.

My personal favorite is letting the breats sit in teriyaki for a night or two and just grilling them. Whats yours?
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Old 11-04-2010, 08:41 PM
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soaking briefly in raspberry vinegaret..(sp?) dressing and frying them in the dressing and butter.... Wood ducks are my duck of choice
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Old 11-05-2010, 10:49 AM
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A nice corn fed Mallard simply roasted (whole) with a few herbs is the best way in my books.

Ron
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Old 11-05-2010, 11:33 AM
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I'll take the 2 sides of a mallard breast, cut them in half, then cut them in half again, and once more. That makes 16 bite sized pieces. I'll marinate them overnight in (insert your favorite marinade here) then make kebobs.

Take 4 pineapple rings, cut them in half, then in half again.

Take 4 pieces of bacon, cut them in half, and cut those pieces in half again. Then wrap the 16 pieces of bacon around the duck meat. Put one on a skewer, add a mushroom, a piece of pepperoni, a piece of pineapple, a piece of zucchini, then repeat with a piece of duck, fungus, pepperoni, pineapple, zucchini.

This should make 4 kebobs, which is enough to feed 2 people.

Grill on medium high heat, they're done when the bacon starts to look crispy. Don't overcook. Turn frequently.
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Old 11-07-2010, 01:52 PM
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Two halves of mallard, soaked overnite in baking soda. Then a little marinade of garlic, salt, pepper with a touch of liquid smoke and a little olive oil for overnight. Cut into 1 1/2 inch strips, usually get 5ive per side and fry gently till done, around seven min. If you eat your steak well done, don't expect duck to taste good, it should be med. rare. Love em that way. The longer they cook, the tougher they get.
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Old 11-09-2010, 06:39 PM
  #6  
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Use the goose thighs for spaghetti sauce, boy does it add flavor to the sauce.
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Old 11-09-2010, 06:50 PM
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1. Brine deboned breats of a duck or goose (even sky carp-snows) for 3-4 hours in salted water.

2. Drain the breasts and soak for 2-3 hrs in apple juice or orange juice with soy sauce or worcestshire sauce, plus whatever herbs & seasonings strike your fancy.

3. Grill or broil until rare-med.rare

4. Salt & pepper to taste, or use favorite steak or bbq sauce.

The meat doesn't get too "apple-y" or "orange-y". Many people who don't like game have enjoyed shish kabobs of this. Even works with muddy tastking ducks.
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Old 11-23-2010, 10:37 PM
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Originally Posted by JoeA View Post
1. Brine deboned breats of a duck or goose (even sky carp-snows) for 3-4 hours in salted water.

2. Drain the breasts and soak for 2-3 hrs in apple juice or orange juice with soy sauce or worcestshire sauce, plus whatever herbs & seasonings strike your fancy.

3. Grill or broil until rare-med.rare

4. Salt & pepper to taste, or use favorite steak or bbq sauce.

The meat doesn't get too "apple-y" or "orange-y". Many people who don't like game have enjoyed shish kabobs of this. Even works with muddy tastking ducks.

"...sky carp-snows." LMAO!!!!!

You know, brining your bird is the right thing to do! There's a reason they teach you that in culinary school. But you can cut 2-3 hours off your method above. (bear with me, I'll make my point shortly) Brining works through osmosis, moving salt water (brine) from the high concentration area to the low concentration area and in the process breaks down proteins blocking the return of some of the brine. This lets the meat become more tender, salty and more flavorful, and leaves some water in the cells which in turn makes it juicy.

Point being, if you were to replace the water in your step one with the juice from step 2 you'll get the brining and flavoring all in one step and reduce the time required to achieve it. That's how professional chefs do it. Give it a whirl.
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