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Draw Weigh increase, shoot higher?

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Draw Weigh increase, shoot higher?

Old 10-12-2017, 12:07 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Default Draw Weigh increase, shoot higher?

I am new to archery and bowhunting and to this group. I have hunted since I could stand with a gun so new to a lot of this stuff. I have been shooting every single day for a month and trying to gather as much info as I can about it all and also to get familiar with my bow and what not. Getting ready to hunt next year with it. I recently increased the poundage from 62 to 69 pounds. Which is a decent jump but can shoot the 69 comfortably roughly 30 times in a session no problem. My arrows began to shoot a decent amount higher at 20-60 yards so I adjusted it and my accuracy also increased fairly drastically. Also noticed it was a bit less forgiving. When I get more comfortable with this poundage Ill be broached tuning it from which I understand is more adjusting the rest instead of the sights. So am I on the right track with that? More important though, is that normal for adjusting higher poundage that it shoots higher and accuracy increases? It makes sense that it would shoot higher if I adjust my poundage higher. If needed I can give my bow info and arrow info. Thank you.
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Old 10-12-2017, 06:07 PM
  #2  
Typical Buck
 
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Yes. With higher poundage and the same weight arrows you will increase velocity therefor you will impact a bit higher. But you may want to check your arrows to make sure you are still in the proper spine/stiffness range. There are graphs on pretty much every arrow manufacturers site to tell you what spine is recommended for the length and poundage as well as cam type.
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Old 10-13-2017, 04:36 PM
  #3  
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I believe your bow is designed to shoot best at peak weight. So say a 70# can be adjusted from 60-70#, it's designed to shoot best at 70#.

I personally adjust limbs evenly, say 2 twists up top, 4 below, 2 more up top, pattern, but that's just me.

Regardless I'd at least match top and bottom, like 4 top, 4 bottom.
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Old 10-14-2017, 01:17 PM
  #4  
Spike
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Thank you for the responses. I am shooting a Hoyt Pro Defiant 60-70 pound bow with a 29" draw length, with Easton Aftermath 6mm 300 spine arrows, blazer vanes with a 2 degree offset, 125 grain field point. Overall weight is 488.2 grains. So decently heavy arrow from the research I have gathered but perfect I think for elk. My accuracy went through the roof when I went up. I did one turn per limb, I might have been off on the starting point of 63 pounds but I measured the 69 pounds. Was just making sure since I shot 4 inches higher than normal but figured I was based on the physics. Just double checking everything I do. Now at 20 shafts are touching till I hit 40 yards. At 50 its roughly 3 inches. 60 yards its about 4-5 inches.
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Old 10-14-2017, 10:06 PM
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Typical Buck
 
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Sounds like you are doing well. Keep practicing till you get those 60 yard impacts into 2 inches and your confidence will go through the roof. I am a firm believer in keeping your shots on live game 40 yards or closer but practice out to 60-70 yards for confidence. My sister is the archer of the family, though we were all raised with bows in our hands, and practices out to 100 yards. All 5 of us are pretty good but she runs circles around us in IBO shoots. Though he wouldn't admit it with a straight face, she even whooped the old man on a regular basis.
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Old 10-15-2017, 05:57 AM
  #6  
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new to a lot of this stuff. I have been shooting every single day for a month and trying to gather as much info as I can about it all and also to get familiar with my bow and what not. Getting ready to hunt next year with it. I recently increased the poundage from 62 to 69 pounds. Which is a decent jump but can shoot the 69 comfortably roughly 30 times in a session no problem. My arrows began to shoot a decent amount higher at 20-60 yards so I adjusted it and my accuracy also increased fairly drastically. Also noticed it was a bit less forgiving. When I get more comfortable with this poundage Ill be broached tuning it from which I understand is more adjusting the rest instead of the sights. So am I on the right track with that? More important though, is that normal for adjusting higher poundage that it shoots higher and accuracy increases? It makes sense that it would shoot higher if I adjust my poundage higher. If needed I can give my bow info and arrow info. Thank you.[/QUOTE]

yes .you can expect to be a bit higher due to more velocity..my advise is do not adjust rest, arrow should remain square w/ string ..do adjust sights..move it towards the miss...obtain a bow square to check for square and to compare brace height from bottom limb to top limb...u can experiment w/ that..if u r using fixed blade broadheads be sure to practice w/ those..they can plane like feathers..grip consistency is vital w/ b'heads...lots and lots of subtleties...have fun and good luck
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Old 10-15-2017, 06:11 PM
  #7  
Spike
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Today I managed to do 2.5" group at 60 and continue to tighten up the 20-40 yard targets. I have no intention or willing to shoot any animal past 40 but its a great way to build up some confidence for sure like you said. It is actually fairly surprising how much of my long range shooting techniques I use for rifle I use with a bow, breathing, shooting between heart beats, pulling release, etc.

Here in idaho for archery hunting it is required by law to use fixed blade broad heads. I read and saw some vids that you do the sight pins for your field points and get those dialed in with the pins but then when finally doing broad heads you adjust the rest and they will meet in the middle if there is a disparity then adjust the pins after that. Im a lil ways from doing broad heads I think personally. I want to practice more how I am right now and get my confidence up, my anchor points memorized, and muscle memory so its second nature, etc. work on the subtleties now as much as I can, then can work on broad heads. I have till August/september to figure it out.
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Old 10-15-2017, 10:22 PM
  #8  
Typical Buck
 
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With today's broadhead technology there are many out there that will fly truly with your field tips. As long as your inserts are installed properly and the broadheads are true to your arrow then planing (broadhead steering) is a thing of the past with a lot of brands out there. Slick Tricks are one of those brands and I have yet to be disappointed with them. I've sent them through a pretty large number of whitetail and a pretty good number of elk and I don't have one of those speed demon bows. I have an old Hoyt Raptor that barely hits 285-290 on it's good days. I did just get my dads new Bowtech when he passed earlier this year and finally got it set up to me so I'll be sending arrows at over 320 now. But I can shoot my arrows tipped with field points then put on a set of my Slick Tricks and hit dead in the same spots on the target with absolutely no adjustments at all. So when you are ready to spin on some broadheads, keep those in mind. But if you do get something else and find you have to tune a little, you are correct in your thinking of rest adjustments. It's usually very small adjustments if any is needed and mostly it is because of the greater length of the broadhead vs the field tip. They launch just a tad differently so a small adjustment, usually away from the riser, or a touch higher, will cure problems. But the Slick tricks are very short so I haven't even had an issue. At least not with the Standard model.
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Old 10-16-2017, 06:27 PM
  #9  
Spike
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Oh okay. Thank you for the info and thank you for everybody else for the responses. I actually am looking into the Slick Tricks for broad heads and glad to hear about the positive feedback. I have a few on the shelf ready to go but want to nail down my bow further then will try those out.
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