Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Firearms Forum > Reloading
Do different cases matter? >

Do different cases matter?

Reloading Share techniques for reloading, where to get the hottest in reloading equipment and learn how to reload from fellow hunters.

Do different cases matter?

Old 05-11-2014, 10:36 AM
  #11  
Boone & Crockett
 
bronko22000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 11,853
Default

Sorry but I'm calling BS on this. I am not talking mixing powders, bullets or primers. Cases are manufactured to SAAMI specs and reloading manuals have loads listed as starting loads and maximum loads. I realize that cases capacity varies from manufacturer to manufacturer but a max load is a max load regardless of case manufacturer. But that is also why I stated only if you are loading below max recommended charge. I see no reason why this is considered an irresponsible post. I've been loading for almost 50 years and I have never had an incident using mixed case brands for a specific load below a manual's listed maximum.
Now for the utmost in accuracy yes, mixing case brands will produce less accuracy due to the minor pressure differences.
bronko22000 is offline  
Old 05-11-2014, 10:58 AM
  #12  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Eastern wv
Posts: 2,643
Default

call it what you want, brass is a mixture of copper and tin, do all manufacturers use the exact same percentage of tin, is all the tin and all the copper the exact same hardness? no 2 makes of brass will show the exact same pressure with the same load, federal brass has long been known to have 3% more case capacity than other brass of the same chambering, there is no way you can make the pressures and velocity the same using the same load. If you ever messed with any wildcats that have no saami specs and used different brass you would know what I'm talking about, but this is fact, Lapua is the best brass to be had, Winchester ain't bad IF IT WAS PROPERLY ANNEALED FROM THE FACTORY, Remington is decent brass but cheaper than the rest, norma weatherby and Dakota are also good, nosler is ok brass at lapua prices that won't handle pressure as well as Winchester.
It is what it is.
RR

Last edited by Ridge Runner; 05-11-2014 at 11:03 AM.
Ridge Runner is offline  
Old 05-11-2014, 12:53 PM
  #13  
Boone & Crockett
 
bronko22000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 11,853
Default

I agree RR. But even brass chemical composition varies from lot to lot. What I am saying is that if you load below maximum charge listed in a loading manual (which even varies from manual to manual) the only "problem" you will encounter is a loss of accuracy. But for hunting except at extreme ranges is not that big a deal. There WILL be pressure differences with the same charge between brass manfs. but the pressures for all cases will be under the recommended allowed for the chambering.
bronko22000 is offline  
Old 05-11-2014, 05:04 PM
  #14  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Eastern wv
Posts: 2,643
Default

Originally Posted by bronko22000 View Post
I agree RR. But even brass chemical composition varies from lot to lot. What I am saying is that if you load below maximum charge listed in a loading manual (which even varies from manual to manual) the only "problem" you will encounter is a loss of accuracy. But for hunting except at extreme ranges is not that big a deal. There WILL be pressure differences with the same charge between brass manfs. but the pressures for all cases will be under the recommended allowed for the chambering.
how much under? basicly what your saying is they will go bang?
in some cases the pressure will be below minimum even with a midlevel load using slow burning powder which can be just as dangerous as an over pressure load. that's why its a good idea to constantly work uploads as you replace brass,and its a lot easier to keep the brass segregated into separate lots and makes, its also a good idea to keep each batch on the same number of firings, my 7mm AM using lapua brass makes higher and higher pressure each time the brass is fired until it gets above 3600 fps, then I anneal, its right back to 3510 fps then.
RR
Ridge Runner is offline  
Old 05-12-2014, 04:18 AM
  #15  
Nontypical Buck
 
alleyyooper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: MICHIGAN
Posts: 2,568
Talking

Some people Just can't seem to think properly.

I just happened to have my Speer # 11 manual handy opened to the section for 243 loads.
At the very top are how they tested the loads in the book.
Rifle Ruger 77 barrel 22" twist 1-10
Cases WW, primers CCI 200 & 250
Way some have posted here that is what you need to use any of the loads for the 243 using the Speer #11 manual,. Can you use the rounds in a Winchester, Remington or any other brand. YES
Can you use other companies cases like federal, Remington or others with out fear YES
Can you use different brand of primers, YES
The Speer #11 manual list a starting load for every weight of bullet and a max load for every weight of bullet.
Case brand does not make one bit of difference as long as the recipes in the manual are followed because all information in the manual is universal which makes them safe in any brand of case. I also have been reloading since I cut my teeth on a old hull or case. 90% of the calibers I reload for are mixed cases.

So as long as you follow the manual you are safe with mixed cases.

Nice thing about the #11 Speer manual they use a real rifle to test the loads.
Some manuals they used a universal receiver to do the test. So you would look silly trying to hunt with a universal receiver because that is what to book says is safe.


Al
alleyyooper is offline  
Old 05-12-2014, 04:48 AM
  #16  
Boone & Crockett
 
falcon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Comance county, OK
Posts: 11,355
Default

Been reloading since the early 1950s. All cases are not created equal. Case thickness is very important. Some cases are very thick (heavy). Reloading manuals specify a specific brand of cartridge case. If the data you are using was developed using a thinner case, you must be careful with heavy powder loads when using a different brand case.

Example: Other components being equal, you cannot safely load a maximum specified powder charge into a .308 case that is ten grains heavier than the case specified for the maximum load.

i have Excel charts of the average case weights of all brands for each caliber i reload for. Cases used for my accuracy loads are weighed and segregated by weight.

On the average, .30-06 Remington cases are 10 grains heavier than their Winchester counterpart. For my maximum .30-06 loads i use Winchester cases.

Sometimes i will load up plinking ammo using cases from several manufacturers with a light to moderate powder charge. BTW: They are usually quite accurate.

Be very careful when reloading 7.62 foreign military cases for use in the .308: Some are very thick.

Last edited by falcon; 05-12-2014 at 04:51 AM.
falcon is offline  
Old 05-12-2014, 09:29 AM
  #17  
Giant Nontypical
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Allegan, MI
Posts: 8,019
Default

falcon---I think we're talking to the wall on this as: "Some people just can't seem to think properly." as mentioned above!!!
Topgun 3006 is offline  
Old 05-12-2014, 04:51 PM
  #18  
Boone & Crockett
 
bronko22000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Eastern PA
Posts: 11,853
Default

OK non-believers let's look at the manuals. Take the .270 Win for example using IMR4350 (I selected a popular caliber and powder)
Speer #8: 130 gr Spitzer; Starting load 52 gr. Max 56.0 (Case Remington)
Lyman 46th ed: 130 gr Spitzer; starting load 49.0, Max 54.5 (Case Winchester)
Hornady Vol II: 130 gr Spire; Starting load 51.6, Max 57.6 (Case Western)
Sierra: 130 Spitzer; Starting load 48.4, Max 54.9 (Case Remington)

So based on my initial post of not loading to maximum charge. My favorite .270 load with 130 gr Hornady Interlock or Sierra Spitzer was 54.0 gr of IMR4350. This load is below the maximum charge for any 130 gr jacketed bullet using any case.
Ergo using mixed brands is not dangerous under these circumstances. The only thing that will suffer is a decrease in accuracy which will not be noticed unless shooting at extreme distances. This load with my Rem 700 which would shoot sub MOA all day long was responsible for killing a few whitetails at 300 yds, a couple antelope at 200 - 300 and one muley buck at 437 yds and I don't know how many whitetails at <100 yds.
bronko22000 is offline  
Old 05-13-2014, 12:56 PM
  #19  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Eastern wv
Posts: 2,643
Default

1 at 437 and ya got it figured out, good for you.
RR
Ridge Runner is offline  
Old 05-13-2014, 05:44 PM
  #20  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: South East Pa.
Posts: 526
Default

I am with Alleyyooper. The only difference in the heavy brass warnings is because the neck on Milspec brass is very thick and could "Choke" the bullet, and the primers are staked. Any good reloading manual should mention this. The original poster did say he switched primers. According to the old NRA Handloaders guide, this caused the biggest variation in accuracy. Way more than + or - a few grains of powder. This was tested by the Frankford Arsenal and published in the Handloaders guide. As far as good and bad brass, it is pretty much a matter of personal choice. I have made chamber reamers and the SAAMI specs on the body diameters of brass is generally .006-.008, but milspec brass is not to SAAMI specs (Maybe it is now, I have been out of it for a while). The military chamber headspace was not even called from the same points SAAMI used, and the European guns had their own specs also.
Gunplummer is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.