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What does it typically cost to rent a UTV (side by side)?

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What does it typically cost to rent a UTV (side by side)?

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Old 04-06-2019, 12:53 AM
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Lightbulb What does it typically cost to rent a UTV (side by side)?

This would be for the day. It would include an electric 4x4 unit with a trailer to haul it with your pickup truck. It would also include the gear racks and possible a trailer for the vehicle itself. I would need to be able to haul: my blood-trailing dog in his crate, my gun and my other gear to get to and from the deer stand or blind. These puppies are much too expensive to buy and own for the deer hunter who only goes hunting once or twice a season.

The price of a new Intimidator is very intimidating as it costs as much as a new automobile or pickup truck!

Here's another idea I have for an invention for the hunter to transport his stuff afield and these are pretty well established in the golf industry already.

What deer hunters need is a good lithium-powered vehicle to haul their gear and deer to the pickup truck from the stand. Let's say you have a blood-trailing dog on a leash that you want to take to your stand and keep him there during the hunt. I don't think it ethical to keep dogs in the vehicle unattended and it's better to have the dog right at the ready anyway in case of a deer that is wounded. Who wants to hike all the way back to the truck to grab their dog while the wounded deer has plenty of time to get miles away? To be legal and proper, the animal will have to be kept on the lead the whole time in the field and that takes up the use of one of your two hands.

The product idea I have is a remote drone (unmanned) electric cart something like a golf cart that would follow the hunter to the stand and back to the truck again. The cart in theory could not only carry his heavy gear but the deer also once harvested thus leaving his hands free of gear management while under way on foot. It may even have a gun rack to hold his rifle. The cart would have to be specially designed for hunting with knobby all-terrain tires, heavy-duty high-tork motor, all-wheel drive and the best-grade rechargeable lithium batteries available. Otherwise, you have to hire human caddies to haul your gear and drag your deer for you.

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Old 04-06-2019, 01:14 AM
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This would be for the day. It would include an electric 4x4 unit with a trailer to haul it with your pickup truck. It would also include the gear racks and possible a trailer for the vehicle itself. I would need to be able to haul: my blood-trailing dog in his crate, my gun and my other gear to get to and from the deer stand or blind. These puppies are much too expensive to buy and own for the deer hunter who only goes hunting once or twice a season.

Here's an article on how to even safely transport your dog on one and you will need an ATV capacious enough for a large dog crate, your deer carcass, all your gear and your gun.

http://www.atv.com/parts-gear/five-t...og-in-your-utv

The price of a new Intimidator is very intimidating as it costs as much as a new automobile or pickup truck!

Here's another idea I have for an invention for the hunter to transport his stuff afield and these are pretty well established in the golf industry already.

What deer hunters need is a good lithium-powered vehicle to haul their gear and deer to the pickup truck from the stand. Let's say you have a blood-trailing dog on a leash that you want to take to your stand and keep him there during the hunt. I don't think it ethical to keep dogs in the vehicle unattended and it's better to have the dog right at the ready anyway in case of a deer that is wounded. Who wants to hike all the way back to the truck to grab their dog while the wounded deer has plenty of time to get miles away? To be legal and proper, the animal will have to be kept on the lead the whole time in the field and that takes up the use of one of your two hands.

The product idea I have is a remote drone (unmanned) electric cart something like a golf cart that would follow the hunter to the stand and back to the truck again. The cart in theory could not only carry his heavy gear but the deer also once harvested thus leaving his hands free of gear management while under way on foot. It may even have a gun rack to hold his rifle. The cart would have to be specially designed for hunting with knobby all-terrain tires, heavy-duty high-tork motor, all-wheel drive and the best-grade rechargeable lithium batteries available. Otherwise, you have to hire human caddies to haul your gear and drag your deer for you.
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Old 04-06-2019, 07:24 AM
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well again, I think your just trolling for reply's and to make a fuss
but I'll throw this out cause I have time to kill!

a costs for a GOOD 4x4 UTV for teh day all depends on location, and size of UTV
most run about 300 bucks a day., add a trailer and costs will go up

next MOST places its ILLEGAL to have your dog with you while deer hunting
third, HOW much gear do you need to take to your deer stand that you need a 4x4 UTV to carry

and last, unless on private land, its also illegal to DRIVE a UTV on public lands minus trails that allow them!
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Old 04-06-2019, 10:22 AM
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For the OP, I get that you have a lot of questions and are trying to figure out your own way in the hunting world. We all are although some people here have hunted for decades and have figured it out pretty well. I know that you reviewed the site before joining and posting. I don't know how deeply you delved into the topics and posts so you may not have picked up some generalities in this website. A few things do come to mind regarding your general line of posting and questions, etc.

Many people will read topics but unless they have something to add or know the answer to a question posed (such as rental prices), they won't post in the topic. It's a sign of respect--they don't want to clutter up your topic with posts where they simply don't have an answer or anything to add that they think would help you. Posting "testing 12345" isn't likely to spur many people to answer. The forum dynamics may seem frustrating to you but that's why there are multiple hunting forum websites as each tends to have it's own unique type of subject matter and posts along with some expected general overlap. Once you start searching the net for a specific topic, you will usually find somebody has posted something about said topic. Maybe even check out an Idaho-specific hunting website for more localized information.

Most of the people on here that hunt tend to pride themselves on hiking to their hunting area, whether they are hunting from a tree-stand, blind or spot and stalk. If they're hunting on public land, vehicles are usually prohibited or restricted to existing roads and trails. Most states tend to have somewhat similar laws about motorized vehicles and hunting but you may find an exception here and there. Having said that, most people on HNI deliberately hike at least a half mile away from roads, vehicles and people while hunting as you will usually find more animals avoiding all 3. It's a bit of a pride thing but also a chance to escape from the world, vehicles, people and just enjoy the total experience that nature has to offer.

An last but certainly not least. I've previously posted that it will help if you post more specifics about the animal(s) you want to hunt, state, type of terrain, type of hunting you'd like to do and even any physical limitations you may or may not want to share. For instance, most bird hunting (except turkeys) involves using a dog. Many people are avid bird hunters and that may be a better fit for you. Small game like rabbits are often hunted with dogs and that may work better for you. These are merely suggestions and you're free to ignore them if you like but they are offered after almost 2 decades of being on this forum. Hopefully this helps you get more use and satisfaction from using HNI.
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Old 04-06-2019, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by CalHunter View Post
For the OP, I get that you have a lot of questions and are trying to figure out your own way in the hunting world. We all are although some people here have hunted for decades and have figured it out pretty well. I know that you reviewed the site before joining and posting. I don't know how deeply you delved into the topics and posts so you may not have picked up some generalities in this website. A few things do come to mind regarding your general line of posting and questions, etc.

Many people will read topics but unless they have something to add or know the answer to a question posed (such as rental prices), they won't post in the topic. It's a sign of respect--they don't want to clutter up your topic with posts where they simply don't have an answer or anything to add that they think would help you. Posting "testing 12345" isn't likely to spur many people to answer. The forum dynamics may seem frustrating to you but that's why there are multiple hunting forum websites as each tends to have it's own unique type of subject matter and posts along with some expected general overlap. Once you start searching the net for a specific topic, you will usually find somebody has posted something about said topic. Maybe even check out an Idaho-specific hunting website for more localized information.

Most of the people on here that hunt tend to pride themselves on hiking to their hunting area, whether they are hunting from a tree-stand, blind or spot and stalk. If they're hunting on public land, vehicles are usually prohibited or restricted to existing roads and trails. Most states tend to have somewhat similar laws about motorized vehicles and hunting but you may find an exception here and there. Having said that, most people on HNI deliberately hike at least a half mile away from roads, vehicles and people while hunting as you will usually find more animals avoiding all 3. It's a bit of a pride thing but also a chance to escape from the world, vehicles, people and just enjoy the total experience that nature has to offer.

An last but certainly not least. I've previously posted that it will help if you post more specifics about the animal(s) you want to hunt, state, type of terrain, type of hunting you'd like to do and even any physical limitations you may or may not want to share. For instance, most bird hunting (except turkeys) involves using a dog. Many people are avid bird hunters and that may be a better fit for you. Small game like rabbits are often hunted with dogs and that may work better for you. These are merely suggestions and you're free to ignore them if you like but they are offered after almost 2 decades of being on this forum. Hopefully this helps you get more use and satisfaction from using HNI.
I'm planning to move to Indiana by this summer. I'm age 55 and have rheumatoid arthritis. I have limited ability to hike. Again, in Indiana I understand the terrain is mostly flat or rolling hills. I don't honestly know how far a deer stand would be from the place a pickup truck is parked. I do know that in states like Idaho one can get a special disability permit to get a motor vehicle close to their point of hunt. I can walk about a two mile round trip with no gear and that's about it. I'm sure even an electric side-by-side might qualify if a hunter can get a disability permit. My apology about the 12345. That was a computer error I had tried to delete earlier but I couldn't because a message here said I was limited to 5 posts a day. If I can't get a disability permit or even a hunting buddy or two, my only other option is to hire people to carry my gear and drag my deer or push the deer with a deer cart back to the truck. I do love good venison especially a doe, but it's not just that one should be deprived because of disability.
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Old 04-07-2019, 01:04 PM
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That makes a lot more sense. You may want to check on Indiana's disabled hunter opportunities. The more you can share, the better people can give feedback.
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Old 04-07-2019, 01:16 PM
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yes that offers a better idea on your needs
some other info I will mention
odds of finding a place that rents UTV's in Indiana are going to be far and few, as the state is not one of the most ATV/UTV friendly places
very limited public lands are about that allow use of them in general, NOT just for hunting, but in general use
so not sure if your planning to hunt private lands or public, as this will make a HUGE difference in how a ATV/UTV/truck or like vehicle can be used on the land
I have a whole bunch of health issue's myself, so I can relate
I personally tend to hunt private land , and have permission from land owners to use an atv to recover downed game animal, or carry in treestands and or the likes ,
these are things you c an do too, BUT it requires you to OWN AN atv, and NOT just rent one
MANY farms I hunt, the farmers have ATV"s they either let me use and or will help on recovering game too if needed, if I DIDN"T take my atv with me!
so this too is something you an also try and set up when finding places to hunt
if you never hunted in Indiana , and all your hunting has been done in Idaho, your going to be in for a BIG change in things
just just lack of public lands your used to and how much smaller they are in Indiana , is going to be a shock to you I think LOL

a good used 4x4 atv can be had for a decent price if you shop right, and be a better investment than just renting one for a few days every season,a s the costs to rent will add up real fast!
I know it doesn;t sound cheap, but when the difference is getting out to hunt and NOT due to limits you have, its money well spent by many's views!
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Old 04-07-2019, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by mrbb View Post
yes that offers a better idea on your needs
some other info I will mention
odds of finding a place that rents UTV's in Indiana are going to be far and few, as the state is not one of the most ATV/UTV friendly places
very limited public lands are about that allow use of them in general, NOT just for hunting, but in general use
so not sure if your planning to hunt private lands or public, as this will make a HUGE difference in how a ATV/UTV/truck or like vehicle can be used on the land
I have a whole bunch of health issue's myself, so I can relate
I personally tend to hunt private land , and have permission from land owners to use an atv to recover downed game animal, or carry in treestands and or the likes ,
these are things you c an do too, BUT it requires you to OWN AN atv, and NOT just rent one
MANY farms I hunt, the farmers have ATV"s they either let me use and or will help on recovering game too if needed, if I DIDN"T take my atv with me!
so this too is something you an also try and set up when finding places to hunt
if you never hunted in Indiana , and all your hunting has been done in Idaho, your going to be in for a BIG change in things
just just lack of public lands your used to and how much smaller they are in Indiana , is going to be a shock to you I think LOL

a good used 4x4 atv can be had for a decent price if you shop right, and be a better investment than just renting one for a few days every season,a s the costs to rent will add up real fast!
I know it doesn;t sound cheap, but when the difference is getting out to hunt and NOT due to limits you have, its money well spent by many's views!
Public lands for deer for me. It may just make more sense to hire a strong hand or two as my 'caddy'. A wheelbarrow can be used to haul a doe out of the bush.
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Old 04-07-2019, 03:46 PM
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they make ans sell special deer cart's just for hauling deer out, there not that costly and work pretty well pending the terrain you need to haul things across!
you can even try going to some gun shops/archery shops, and asking if anyone there would be willing to maybe work on a like a ON CALL basis
this way if you shoot something you can call them for help to recover
shooting and leaving a deer on public lands to go get help, might end up with a deer being gone when you get back
once you get there, maybe you'l;l get lucky and ask a few land owners for some permission and get some, all the more so if all your looking for is a doe
its normally a lot easier to get access to private land when looking for a doe than a buck
lots of farm land in Indiana!
so if you get access, many farmers have atv's and many are willing to help you recover things, never hurts to ask about when you get there
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Old 04-08-2019, 09:22 PM
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Something to realize, which most non-hunters wouldn’t intuit, but seems to be a critical failing of your plan.

You do not want your blood tracking dog to be on the deer immediately, or even remotely soon after the deer is shot. If you need a dog, it is because the deer didn’t go down quickly, which likely means a less-than-optimal shot placement. You might need to wait half a day before even starting to track, else your “tracking” dog will become a “chasing” dog. Deer need time to die on a poorly placed shot, and starting on the trail too early will bump them out of their bedding and make them run farther.

It’s a critical and absolute mistake to start tracking too soon.

That extra travel time back to retrieve your dog might be extra energy, but it’s certainly not lost or wasted time.
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