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Bedding the stock on my 700ADL

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Old 12-17-2010, 01:44 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by Colorado Cajun View Post
I'm going to wait on bedding anything in the barrel channel until after I finish the action area. The weakest part of the stock and where I think it was flexing is at the recoil lug. I took a lot of material out of that area and will fill it with bedding. I'm thinking it will stiffen it up so I'll wait to see how much.

Do you tape the first inch or so on the bolt before putting the release agent?
I think you will regret not bedding the barrel section at the same time that you bed the receiver. If you do the barrel section later, you will sqeeze some bedding compound up onto the bedding that was previously done for the receiver. I tried to add bedding once (long ago), never again. The only good way to do that is to re-sand the receiver bedding and put another coat of bedding down so that the barrel bedding is the same as the receiver.

Do not put tape on the bolt. After you are done it is easy to clean out any thread impressions from the bolts by using a drill bit. I do coat all threads with a release agent, just in case. My favorite release agent is a floor paste wax (Johnson) that I have used for years. I almost never use the release agent that comes with the kit - it works well, but I like the wax better. The wax can be applied very thinly or it can be used to partially fill in exposed threads. The wax is quickly cleaned off with some WD-40.

I cut a V shape in two ends of a strong cardboard box to hold the rifle while bedding. The box makes clean-up fast, and it allows you to support the weight that is used to press the barreled action down into the bedding. Your weights need to be placed so that they can not slide off of the top of the receiver while the bedding is curing.
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Old 12-17-2010, 02:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
I think you will regret not bedding the barrel section at the same time that you bed the receiver. If you do the barrel section later, you will sqeeze some bedding compound up onto the bedding that was previously done for the receiver. I tried to add bedding once (long ago), never again. The only good way to do that is to re-sand the receiver bedding and put another coat of bedding down so that the barrel bedding is the same as the receiver.

Do not put tape on the bolt. After you are done it is easy to clean out any thread impressions from the bolts by using a drill bit. I do coat all threads with a release agent, just in case. My favorite release agent is a floor paste wax (Johnson) that I have used for years. I almost never use the release agent that comes with the kit - it works well, but I like the wax better. The wax can be applied very thinly or it can be used to partially fill in exposed threads. The wax is quickly cleaned off with some WD-40.

I cut a V shape in two ends of a strong cardboard box to hold the rifle while bedding. The box makes clean-up fast, and it allows you to support the weight that is used to press the barreled action down into the bedding. Your weights need to be placed so that they can not slide off of the top of the receiver while the bedding is curing.

I'm thinking after reading this that I may not be uderstanding what exactly should be bedded in the barrel section. I'm thinking of filling in the hollowed section of the barrel channel without it touching the barrel to strengthen the stock. Are you saying to bed the upper edges between the stock and barrel for a few inches? Wouldn't that work against free floating?


Originally Posted by Pawildman View Post
Be sure and remember that the ONLY place you want the recoil lug to contact the stock is at the rear of the lug only. Both of the sides, bottom, and front of the lug MUST have clearance. If you can't get adequate clearance in those areas at the time of bedding, they can be cleaned out after removing the barreled action when the compound has set well using the Dremel. I also use the Dremel to drill anchoring holes for the bedding compund along the barrel channel and the interior of the stock where the action rests. A good heavy scuffing is seriously needed also.
After reading your post as well as BU's, I need to put atleast one more layer of tape on the bottom, front, and sides of the lug. I only have one layer right now. Thanks! I did drill some small holes where the bedding will contact the stock. That was after the latest pictures.
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Old 12-17-2010, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Colorado Cajun View Post
Are you saying to bed the upper edges between the stock and barrel for a few inches? Wouldn't that work against free floating?
.
A bedding job on a hunting rifle normally has only a couple of inches of the barrel bedded. This is the thick part of the barrel where it screws into the receiver. The remaining barrel is completely free floated.
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Old 12-17-2010, 04:14 PM
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You are going to solid-bed the action. You also need to solid-bed about 2" of the barrel too, and let the rest of it free-float. My rule-of-thumb is to solid bed as much of the barrel as the chamber in the barrel takes up. I use electrician's tape to tape off the barrel area I want free-floated. I use about 3 layers of tape. Don't worry about having too much gap between the barrel and the stock when things are finished... that's a good guarantee you are not going to get barrel/stock interference. Simply remove enough stock to get a clearance between the taped barrel and the stock before doing the bedding...
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Old 12-17-2010, 06:18 PM
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Thank you Big Uncle and Pawildman!!! I understand now. Tomorrow I will remove the tape and prep that part until the end of the chamber and bed it too. I'll probably actually do the bedding tomorrow. I appreciate you guy's help. Was going to work on it tonight but my daughter went sleep at a friends house so I'm going to do some other bedding. LOL! Gotta go!
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Old 12-17-2010, 09:34 PM
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People do it but there is no real reason you need to bed the first two inches of barrel when glass bedding a rifle with a typical sporter weight or typical factory bull barrel.

If, on the other hand, you are to build a rifle with an exceptionally long and heavy barrel it helps to bed the entire length of the barrel to help support the barrel and remove stresses that that heavy barrel will put on to the receiver.

If you want to know the truth... When you fire a cartridge the chamber area expands radially. By bedding under the chamber area of a rifle you are actually not allowing the chamber area to expand evenly around the full 360* of the barrel. What you are actually creating is uneven radial chamber expansion. If the barrel is completely floated all the way to the recoil lug the barrel expands evenly all around the circumference of the barrel.
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Old 12-18-2010, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Pawildman View Post
You are going to solid-bed the action. You also need to solid-bed about 2" of the barrel too, and let the rest of it free-float. My rule-of-thumb is to solid bed as much of the barrel as the chamber in the barrel takes up. I use electrician's tape to tape off the barrel area I want free-floated. I use about 3 layers of tape. Don't worry about having too much gap between the barrel and the stock when things are finished... that's a good guarantee you are not going to get barrel/stock interference. Simply remove enough stock to get a clearance between the taped barrel and the stock before doing the bedding...
Good description.

CC - Dry fit everything first. Put the barreled action into the bedding compound slowly. The compound should ooze out a bit. When it comes time to remove the barreded action from the cured bedding it will be tight and will probably be difficult to get them seperated the first time. This is normal. Try to resist using the barrel too much as a lever to get them apart. After you get the job apart and cleaned up you will be a happy guy. Don't worry about a couple of tiny imperfections when you pull it out of the cured bedding.

Stress relief activities to prepare for the glass bedding is should be included in the instructions by Brownell!
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Old 12-18-2010, 07:06 AM
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While I sorta agree with you, it goes against everything melvin Forbes from NULA told me. I stopped by his shop once. And the guy is a bedding maniac. I have watched his pencil thin barrels shoot up to 20 shots at one time and never change POI or accuracy. I was blown away.

He always goes back to bedding being the most critical. I was telling him, my accuracy on this gun or that, falls after 3 shots, he said, "bedding". Or told him a gun was finicky, and he said, "bedding". He even had an occilloscope set up showing harmonics of a barrel by tapping with full length beddding vs. just recoil lug. Showing why a gun can be so finicky. I am still not sold, but I believe he is one of the best smiths in america.

A good friend of mine who is a 1000 BR shooter, even hogs out the barrel channel 1/4" and glasses the entire thing. No pressure on the barrel, just laying on the bedding. The guy shoots awesome. When he beds, it looks like the messiest process you ever seen, and he ends up sanding the edges with a belt sander to get even and refinishes.

Originally Posted by bigbulls View Post
People do it but there is no real reason you need to bed the first two inches of barrel when glass bedding a rifle with a typical sporter weight or typical factory bull barrel.

If, on the other hand, you are to build a rifle with an exceptionally long and heavy barrel it helps to bed the entire length of the barrel to help support the barrel and remove stresses that that heavy barrel will put on to the receiver.

If you want to know the truth... When you fire a cartridge the chamber area expands radially. By bedding under the chamber area of a rifle you are actually not allowing the chamber area to expand evenly around the full 360* of the barrel. What you are actually creating is uneven radial chamber expansion. If the barrel is completely floated all the way to the recoil lug the barrel expands evenly all around the circumference of the barrel.
 
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Old 12-18-2010, 07:21 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by bigbulls View Post
People do it but there is no real reason you need to bed the first two inches of barrel when glass bedding a rifle with a typical sporter weight or typical factory bull barrel.

If, on the other hand, you are to build a rifle with an exceptionally long and heavy barrel it helps to bed the entire length of the barrel to help support the barrel and remove stresses that that heavy barrel will put on to the receiver.

If you want to know the truth... When you fire a cartridge the chamber area expands radially. By bedding under the chamber area of a rifle you are actually not allowing the chamber area to expand evenly around the full 360* of the barrel. What you are actually creating is uneven radial chamber expansion. If the barrel is completely floated all the way to the recoil lug the barrel expands evenly all around the circumference of the barrel.
..... I totally understand your theory, and I'm certainly not saying you are wrong at all. I'm simply using my personal experiences of what has worked well for me in the past. I have solid-bedded the entire barreled action of a couple of guns, one being a Model 88 Win., and that gun shot great after it was finished, but also had the forend screw to deal with anyhow. The others have been a 721 Rem., and a 700 Rem., with less-than satisfactory results. I guess that's what makes differing opinions..
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Old 12-18-2010, 08:50 AM
  #20  
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Alright! I think the stock is ready to go. What do you think?


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