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Bedding the stock on my 700ADL

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Old 12-15-2010, 10:05 PM
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Typical Buck
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Default Bedding the stock on my 700ADL

I started a thread under the gun section about new stocks and then later decided bed the factory stock in stead.
http://www.huntingnet.com/forum/guns...00-3006-a.html

I decided to start a new thread on the bedding project here so I can get help and advise as well as a thread to help anyone else considering doing this for the first time. This is my first time bedding a stock. Here is the kit I ordered, it should be in tomorrow. http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/sid=3..._GEL_4_oz__Kit

Here are a few before pictures. I'll post progress as it comes alone. I found I had some non skid tape (just like sand paper) so I wrapper a 1/2 dowl to make a round sanding block. I started sanding tonight and it works great.




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Old 12-16-2010, 06:21 PM
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You need to enlarge the recess for the recoil lug, with particular attention to the area to the rear of the lug. As this area takes the majority of the recoil, this is the most important area. This area should be enlarged in the front, back, sides, and bottom.
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Old 12-16-2010, 09:37 PM
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You also need to make certain that the stock is extremely rough and that you make "gouges" where you are going to apply the bedding material. Epoxy does not like to stick to those factory "tupper ware" synthetic stocks. You have to mechanically lock the epoxy to the stock and not rely completely on the epoxies bonding properties.

The sanding you have done so far isn't nearly rough enough on a plastic synthetic stock.
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Old 12-17-2010, 08:25 AM
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Originally Posted by bigbulls View Post
You also need to make certain that the stock is extremely rough and that you make "gouges" where you are going to apply the bedding material. Epoxy does not like to stick to those factory "tupper ware" synthetic stocks. You have to mechanically lock the epoxy to the stock and not rely completely on the epoxies bonding properties.

The sanding you have done so far isn't nearly rough enough on a plastic synthetic stock.

These are before pictures, without any sanding or grinding. I'll post some more soon of the sanded, grinded stock. After reading the instructions that came with the kit, it said to drill some small holes in the stock for a mechanical lock. I did that last night. The pictues I have on my camera are BEFORE I dilled the holes. I'll get one with the holes tonight. Thanks for the advice, please keep it coming.
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Old 12-17-2010, 08:44 AM
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Here is an update. Got some sanding done and removed a lot of material around the recoil lug. I also took it down around the tang and front stock screw to build those are up with glass for more strength. (I'm hoping I don't regreat that later.) The only thing I have done so far not in these pictures is drill holes in the areas getting glass to create a mechanical lock for the glass as recommended in the instructions that came with the kit.









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Old 12-17-2010, 09:40 AM
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You don't need the tape inside the barrel channel. Tape goes on the barrel to give the desired float after you remove it, but you want the bedding to attach to the barrel channel. Are you going to bed the first couple of inches of the barrel?
I would double the tape on the front, sides, and bottom of the recoil lug to give the lug room to make it easier get the action in & out of the stock.
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Old 12-17-2010, 10:09 AM
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On a 700 action I like to do something a bit different with the action screws. I have a set of bolts (easily found at any hardware store) that are longer than the original action screws by about an inch or so. I cut the heads off of the bolts, gring a small flat on two sides of the last 1/4" (so they can easily be removed with a wrench later), put them into the action, and put the release agent on the bolts. This seals up the threaded holes in the action, and pushes the bedding compound down through the stock action holes.
Normally the original action screws are pushed up through the bedding compound which pushes a bit of compound into the screw holes of the receiver. Using the original action screws works fine, but the alternative method works a bit better. With the alternative method weight (about 10 pounds) is placed on top of the action to keep it down into the stock while the bedding compound sets for a few hours.
If you use the original screws be careful to tighten them enough to pull the action down into the bedding compound, but not enough to stress the action. The tang and the taped barrel will make contact, but the front of the action is being pulled into a thicker area of bedding which will not provide support, allowing the action to be stressed if overtightened.
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Old 12-17-2010, 10:40 AM
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..... A Dremel tool is a stock bedder's best friend.......
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Old 12-17-2010, 12:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
You don't need the tape inside the barrel channel. Tape goes on the barrel to give the desired float after you remove it, but you want the bedding to attach to the barrel channel. Are you going to bed the first couple of inches of the barrel?
I would double the tape on the front, sides, and bottom of the recoil lug to give the lug room to make it easier get the action in & out of the stock.

The tape in the barrel channel is there for cleanup just incase I make a mess. You can't see it on the barrel in the pictures but I do have have several wraps on the barrel to give it a float. I did check after I taped the barrel channel to make sure that the tape I put won't interfear with the floating.

You got me thinking now and I'll probably remove it just to make sure it doesn't interfear and when I tighten it down, I want to keep an eye on that area, on both sides of the barrels.

I'm going to wait on bedding anything in the barrel channel until after I finish the action area. The weakest part of the stock and where I think it was flexing is at the recoil lug. I took a lot of material out of that area and will fill it with bedding. I'm thinking it will stiffen it up so I'll wait to see how much.

Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
On a 700 action I like to do something a bit different with the action screws. I have a set of bolts (easily found at any hardware store) that are longer than the original action screws by about an inch or so. I cut the heads off of the bolts, gring a small flat on two sides of the last 1/4" (so they can easily be removed with a wrench later), put them into the action, and put the release agent on the bolts. This seals up the threaded holes in the action, and pushes the bedding compound down through the stock action holes.
Normally the original action screws are pushed up through the bedding compound which pushes a bit of compound into the screw holes of the receiver. Using the original action screws works fine, but the alternative method works a bit better. With the alternative method weight (about 10 pounds) is placed on top of the action to keep it down into the stock while the bedding compound sets for a few hours.
If you use the original screws be careful to tighten them enough to pull the action down into the bedding compound, but not enough to stress the action. The tang and the taped barrel will make contact, but the front of the action is being pulled into a thicker area of bedding which will not provide support, allowing the action to be stressed if overtightened.
Too funny! I had just got back from the hardware store with fine thread 1/4 bolts and cut the heads off right before reading this. Do you put release agent inside the screw holes on the stock?
Do you tape the first inch or so on the bolt before putting the release agent? I was planning on doing both. I had saw it done that way on a You Tube video and thought it was slick.

Originally Posted by Pawildman View Post
..... A Dremel tool is a stock bedder's best friend.......
I used the sanding drum in the recoil lug area and it really made quick work of it.
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Old 12-17-2010, 01:09 PM
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Be sure and remember that the ONLY place you want the recoil lug to contact the stock is at the rear of the lug only. Both of the sides, bottom, and front of the lug MUST have clearance. If you can't get adequate clearance in those areas at the time of bedding, they can be cleaned out after removing the barreled action when the compound has set well using the Dremel. I also use the Dremel to drill anchoring holes for the bedding compund along the barrel channel and the interior of the stock where the action rests. A good heavy scuffing is seriously needed also.
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