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bedding/floating etc...

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Old 04-29-2010, 05:19 PM
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so im 99% sure my winter project next year is a new stock for my m700 SPS Varmint..

right now it sits in a cheesy plastic stock...and i mean cheesy..

it already proved its a shooter...but its time to start moving forward..

i bought the gun when they first came out for a rifle to shoot and hunt with...but made sure it was a m700 action so i can build off it as i go...in the end, i'll end up with a m700 action and custom rifle..

im pretty well set on a laminate target style stock...probably Richards microfit "tactical thumbhole" just because i like to looks of that stock and it aughta fit the bill...

rifle use is varmint hunting and target shooting....

weight isnt an issue...if i wanted a light rifle i would have bought a light rifle..i want a steady accurate rifle..period.

so this winter im thinking the stock and trigger job are a good place to start for upgrades...


just dont know the best way to bed and/or float the rig...accuracy and stability is what im after....

so...that being said, whats the best way to bed/float etc the stock/action etc...???
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Old 04-29-2010, 06:24 PM
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thanx RR! actually, although typically im a do it yourself kinda guy, i wasnt planning on doing this myself other than the finishing...

i'll have the stock fit to me and recoil pad put on..have it bedded and have the trigger done etc...

then when it comes home i'll finish the stock..

thats my plans anyways..i dont THINK it needs to be finished for a smith to do any of the work...and any minor marks he may put on the stock will be gone because i'll be finishing it after the work is done...

just hate the thought of a rifle stock ive never even fired in a clamp and jig and blah blah etc and coming out with oneeee tiny little ding that most people wouldnt notice lol...


it is a heavy barrel and always will be...26" heavy barrel to be exact...


like i said, weight and size have nothing to do with this rifle..so long as it doesnt take machinery to move it...lol...my next varminter will be light weight and a walk around type varminter and a smaller caliber (22 cal or less)..and this one will eventually become a larger caliber when i rebarrel it...but will always be a long range poker..a big heavy rifle that just plain out shoots...
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Old 05-04-2010, 06:35 PM
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Well...now to decide on color...pretty sure I like the tactical thumbhole from richards microfit...they have colors listed without pics so I emaild them to see if I could get an updated list to pick from....


Should I have it oversize inletted?? They offer 1/16th oversized action inletting for bedding....good idea?? Or no? Or should I call the smith that's gunna do the work???

Also...not set in stone on that stock or company...but like the looks of that stock and should be very comfortable...and hear good things about the company and their stocks....but open to suggestions...just what I'm leaning towards...
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Old 08-19-2010, 10:39 AM
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ive been wondering about the richards stocks too.im interested in the dual grip for my 22-250.if you do get one let us know how it works out please.
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Old 08-19-2010, 09:35 PM
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The only thing I would do any different than ridgerunner postedis i go full length when I glass bed a rifle clear to the end of the forend of the stock. I started doin that on older wooden stocks because even after being floated sometimes I would have a stock warp and it would have to be floated again. Started full length glassing them and the stock can twist and warp all it wants without adding pressure points on the barrel. I do it on synthetic stocks now just to get rid of the slop in them when you squeeze the stock against the barrel. I love the accuracy improvements I get to.

As far as having it inletted I like being the one who takes out only the material I need to. If I was doing it I wouldnt want the stock inletted. So ask your gunsmith before you order it.
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Old 08-20-2010, 03:17 PM
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I bought an unfinished Richard's laminate stock just over a year ago for a friend's Sako. I pillar bed and glass bedded the action, free floated the entire barrel, and bedded the barrel channel. I don't do this for a living, and while it took more time than a gunsmith, it isn't difficult. I finished all the work for the barreled action and shot it for extremely good groups before shaping and finishing the outside of the stock.
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Old 08-23-2010, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Ridge Runner View Post
take it to a smith, have the action bedded along with the recoil lug and 2" of barrel, float the rest. also ya may consider havin it pillared if its a heavy barrel.
Now I know ya was looking foreward to doin it yourself, trust me its not worth it, smiths know how much compound to use to make a good job, they've done it enough to be able to do it neatly. what they can do in 45 min takes me 6-7 hours to docause they bed 1 a month and I do one every 3-4 years.
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...........RR is correct. Iff'n you don't know what you're doin', go to a good 'smith. Actions can be a bit of a bugger to get right for an old hand at it, and Rems are one of the easiest to do. Recoil lugs need bedded and relieved on all sides but the rear. Uniform clearances need established around the action to ensure equal shrinkage as the compound firms up. 2" of barrel need solid bedded with the action, the rest of the barrel needs free-floated with adequate clearance to protect against stock contact due to humidity and warpage. I favor bedding the hogged-out barrel channel also. It helps stiffen the forend and provides a good impervious seal against moisture. But, if you're set about doing it yourself, there are sites you can access to guide you thru it, and tell you what in the way of equipment you will need. Good luck. It's a lot more involved than it first appears.....
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Old 08-24-2010, 08:37 AM
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Originally Posted by needs_recoil View Post
The only thing I would do any different than ridgerunner postedis i go full length when I glass bed a rifle clear to the end of the forend of the stock. I started doin that on older wooden stocks because even after being floated sometimes I would have a stock warp and it would have to be floated again. Started full length glassing them and the stock can twist and warp all it wants without adding pressure points on the barrel.
Full length bedding a hunting rifle is not a very good idea. Any pressure changes on the stock (like shooting with a tight sling) will cause changes in the bedding that will affect POI.
Adding bedding material to the stock is helpful in the barrel channel for a few of the reasons previously discussed, but the barrel should only contact the bedding for the first 2"- 3" and be floated for the rest.
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Old 08-24-2010, 10:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
Full length bedding a hunting rifle is not a very good idea. Any pressure changes on the stock (like shooting with a tight sling) will cause changes in the bedding that will affect POI.
Adding bedding material to the stock is helpful in the barrel channel for a few of the reasons previously discussed, but the barrel should only contact the bedding for the first 2"- 3" and be floated for the rest.

I take it that you are talking about solid-bedding the entire barreled action, no barrel floating. .....I did that once. Only once. Ended up hogging the barrel channel out and doing it over with the free-float.
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Old 08-24-2010, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Pawildman View Post
I take it that you are talking about solid-bedding the entire barreled action, no barrel floating. .....I did that once. Only once. Ended up hogging the barrel channel out and doing it over with the free-float.
Yes, that was the point that I was trying to make.
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