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Rare vs too rare

Old 12-11-2008, 05:05 PM
  #1  
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Default Rare vs too rare

I really like my "beef" steaks rare. Not like still mooing but close too it. Is there a risk at eating my venison too rare? Is there a difference in eating rare tenderloin and rare hams or flank?

Just curious.
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Old 12-12-2008, 06:45 AM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

Rare tender loins are terrific,as are the loins.The ham(rounds/sirloin tip) can be a little tough, depending on the deer. Forget flank as it is too small on a deer to do anything but put it into burger. On the round you can tenderize them with a meat hammer and quick fry that works well, or you can tenderize them with marinade/chemicals it works too but not my fav.
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Old 12-12-2008, 07:58 AM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

As with any meat there is always a risk of illness from not thoroughly cooking. Personally I love my beef to still have a pulse, but I'll only eat it that rare when I'm cooking,not when I'm out at a restaurant. I know the cows I'm eating -- they come from a farm up the road. I'd be a bit more cautious with deer meat. Personally I don't think deer meat tastes as good rare.
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Old 12-13-2008, 12:31 PM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

I`m with HG on this one. I do like my steaks after ther tail and horns have been cut off and waved over the plate but I`m a bit more cautious with wild meat.

Ron
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Old 12-13-2008, 09:40 PM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

Tender loin cooked over a pecan wood fire just until the middle is warm is my favorite. I have never had any trouble.
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Old 12-14-2008, 04:37 PM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

Would you all please explain to me just why you are more willing to eat rare beef than rare venison? The only wayI like a steak or tenderloin is rare, and that'sexactly the wayI eat it. I've been eating venison as a primary, and almost only,source of red meat for better than 30 years. I'd ahell of a lot rather trustin eatingwild game rare, thatI had at least had some control over how it was killed and handled afterwards, as to eat anything out of a store that came from a slaughterhouse. If I hadI my own farm, and raised my own beefers, slaughtered and butchered on site, I would eat either without hesitation, although after all these years of venison, I'm not that crazy about beef. Venison (taste) is all about the way it's killed, dressed, aged, wrapped, and cooked.
Very courious as to why some of you are more comfortable eating rare beef as opposed to venison?
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Old 12-16-2008, 09:07 AM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

Slo-bo: Dontcha know that the "experts" know better than you? After all, the store bought beef has the USDA seal of approval! I bet you don't have the USDA seal of approval on your venison.

No offense intended to anyone, just trying to pull your chain, that's all. I do think that people put too much trust in "the system" or in "the experts." Why, after all, is a slaughterhouse better than anindividual at caring for his game? I think if reasonable, diligent care is exercised, that home butchered venison is no problem. How did people survive in the old days when the USDA wasn't around -- I mean like in the 1500's? It is a myth that what we eat is 100% free of bacteria. Our bodies are robust enough to cope with and overcome a reasonable ambient level of bacteria. If you don't foul your game badly during field dressing; if you get your meat cooled down timely; if you keep the meat reasonably clean while cutting up; if you wrap the meat tightly in plastic wrap and with freezer paper; if you freeze your meat solid . . . you aren't going to have any problems.

All meat has bacteria. The name of the game is keeping the bacteria from running away. When cool, bacteria reproduce less rapidly; when hot, bacteria reproduce rapidly and can shortly runaway and spoil meat. When an animal is alive, the animal's immune system keeps the bacteria levels in check. When the animal dies, the immune system stops working and the bacteria begins to reproduce. It doesn't require some crazy, wild maneuvres to manage this. Just be mindful of the outside temperature, get the animal cooling promptly (immediately removing the large volume of body cavity organs -- which operate as a huge heat reservoir -- is a big help in starting the cooling process). If the temperatures are cool, as they often are during deer gun season, the venison can benefit from hanging for awhile, for example 18 to 24 hours, to allow the chemical process of 'rigor mortis' to come and go. Just 18 hours of hanging before butchering can allow this process to complete and results in more tender venison. If it is 80 degrees outside, skip this step. If it is a high of 50-55 degrees and dropping down to 40 degrees or less at night, let the deer hang overnight.
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:10 AM
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

The deer meat can't possibly be safe with all the chemicals that injected into deer to fatten them up. (sarcasm)

I eat both beef and deer that are bloody as hell. Just my taste. I like them tender.

When I cook deer straps, I turn an iron skillet on high and cook about 30 seconds on both sides.
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Old 12-23-2008, 10:25 AM
  #9  
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

ORIGINAL: Slo-bo

Would you all please explain to me just why you are more willing to eat rare beef than rare venison? The only wayI like a steak or tenderloin is rare, and that'sexactly the wayI eat it. I've been eating venison as a primary, and almost only,source of red meat for better than 30 years. I'd ahell of a lot rather trustin eatingwild game rare, thatI had at least had some control over how it was killed and handled afterwards, as to eat anything out of a store that came from a slaughterhouse. If I hadI my own farm, and raised my own beefers, slaughtered and butchered on site, I would eat either without hesitation, although after all these years of venison, I'm not that crazy about beef. Venison (taste) is all about the way it's killed, dressed, aged, wrapped, and cooked.
Very courious as to why some of you are more comfortable eating rare beef as opposed to venison?
AMEN!
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Old 12-23-2008, 07:47 PM
  #10  
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Default RE: Rare vs too rare

I like all my meats medium rare. Warm red center. It doesn't matter to me whether itsvenison or beef. If people knew what hormones we pumped into beef to get them to grow faster, they probably wouldn't eat it.
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