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Omega Barrel Floating

Old 09-15-2011, 08:38 PM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default Omega Barrel Floating

I have a couple quick questions on suitable materials to use for floating a barrel that I hope you guys can help me with. Sabotloader, if you would chime in on this I would greatly appreciate it.

I shoot a TC Omega Z5, which has one of the infamous pastic stocks. The forearm runs flush with the barrel for the full length of the forearm and it drives me insane.

I did a search on "omega torque" (originally thought the problem was inconsistent lbs/in in my action screws) and resurrected this jewel of a thread by sabotloader http://www.huntingnet.com/forum/blac...-weakness.html. Quick fix #1 explains that free floating the barrel may provide some consistency in POI and you also mentioned that you used Teflon shims cut from your wife's cutting board for your shims to float the barrel.

I have two questions:

First - In hindsight, have the Teflon shims performed satisfactorily? I would like to float the barrel of my Omega and I was wondering if Teflon worked okay or if I should use a metal shim?

Second - Is it okay to float the barrel without bedding the action? Must these two procedures be performed at the same time or can I go ahead and float the barrel now and bed the action later on when I have more time allowance?
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Old 09-16-2011, 02:34 AM
  #2  
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Shims are a temporary solution. The better solution is to sand the barrel channel. Take a 1" dowel rod and wrap it with 120 grit sandpaper (I stapled the sandpaper to the dowel rod). Run it back and forth from the first lug toward the muzzle end with even pressure. With the buttstock against the floor or table, refasten your barreled action to the stock and run the dollar bill test (make sure you are not resting the stock against anything when you do this). Note where you feel resistance (if any), and go back to sanding those particular spots by hand (w/o dowel rod). Just be careful not to sand too much. Repeat until you can run the dollar bill with no felt resistance. Then, place the gun in a gun rest or lay it in some manner where there is pressure on the forend of the stock, and the run the dollar bill test again. You will likely encounter resistance. This is fine. The point is to demonstrate that, when shooting, you should have the gun resting as far back towards the breech as possible.

Most of this I learned from messaging with Sabotloader, so (hopefully) I'll save him a little typing time here.

You don't need to bed the action at the same time. I have not yet bed my action and I'm not sure I will. I find that with a muzzleloader I'm apt to remove the barreled action from the stock much more often than I would a centerfire rifle.
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Old 09-16-2011, 07:16 AM
  #3  
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Originally Posted by Crowkilla View Post
I have a couple quick questions on suitable materials to use for floating a barrel that I hope you guys can help me with. Sabotloader, if you would chime in on this I would greatly appreciate it.

I shoot a TC Omega Z5, which has one of the infamous pastic stocks. The forearm runs flush with the barrel for the full length of the forearm and it drives me insane.

I did a search on "omega torque" (originally thought the problem was inconsistent lbs/in in my action screws) and resurrected this jewel of a thread by sabotloader http://www.huntingnet.com/forum/blac...-weakness.html. Quick fix #1 explains that free floating the barrel may provide some consistency in POI and you also mentioned that you used Teflon shims cut from your wife's cutting board for your shims to float the barrel.

I have two questions:

First - In hindsight, have the Teflon shims performed satisfactorily? I would like to float the barrel of my Omega and I was wondering if Teflon worked okay or if I should use a metal shim?
I think NATO covered pretty much what would think and say...

The shims worked well and I did use them through one hunting season, but the can tend to increase the stress on the rear walls of the two recoil pockets.

Second - Is it okay to float the barrel without bedding the action? Must these two procedures be performed at the same time or can I go ahead and float the barrel now and bed the action later on when I have more time allowance?
Certainly...

I do think that you might look at a method to re-inforce the rear walls of the recoil lug pockets at some point.
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Old 09-16-2011, 07:26 AM
  #4  
Fork Horn
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Thanks, 7.62. I appreciate the advice.

I'm going to go ahead and sand the barrel channel as you suggested now that know I may not need to bed the action.

One follow-up question if you don't mind - Would you suggest I use shims along with sanding the barrel channel or is sanding the barrel channel alone sufficient?

Thanks again.
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Old 09-16-2011, 07:37 AM
  #5  
Fork Horn
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Originally Posted by sabotloader View Post
Certainly...

I do think that you might look at a method to re-inforce the rear walls of the recoil lug pockets at some point.
Ah, thanks sabotloader. I just saw your response. I will definitley look into this.
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Old 09-16-2011, 07:45 AM
  #6  
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I feel that sanding and using shims is redundant. Thom2 did it, but it doesn't make sense to me. If you sand the barrel channel out and it passes the dollar bill test (i.e. there is no resistance from the stock), then I see no purpose for using shims. The goal is to float the barrel. If there's no resistance, the barrel is floated. Why did Thom2 use shims then? Beats me. I think because he did the shims first, and it did not pass the dollar bill test, so he also had to sand. At that point I would have just sanded until I didn't need the shims any longer.

I am going to fill the void between the lug pockets tonight with some J-B Weld putty and will report back on how well it does (I am hoping it will bond to the stock). That will reinforce the rear of the front pocket but not the rear. I am not sure how the rear of the rear pocket can be reinforced, but I will take a look at it tonight.

Did I say "rear" enough times to confuse you???
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Old 09-16-2011, 07:56 AM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by 7.62NATO View Post
I feel that sanding and using shims is redundant. Thom2 did it, but it doesn't make sense to me. If you sand the barrel channel out and it passes the dollar bill test (i.e. there is no resistance from the stock), then I see no purpose for using shims. The goal is to float the barrel. If there's no resistance, the barrel is floated. Why did Thom2 use shims then? Beats me. I think because he did the shims first, and it did not pass the dollar bill test, so he also had to sand. At that point I would have just sanded until I didn't need the shims any longer.

I am going to fill the void between the lug pockets tonight with some J-B Weld putty and will report back on how well it does (I am hoping it will bond to the stock). That will reinforce the rear of the front pocket but not the rear. I am not sure how the rear of the rear pocket can be reinforced, but I will take a look at it tonight.

Did I say "rear" enough times to confuse you???
Drop in a little bit of Weld behind the second pocket also - just enough to make a bit of a wedge to re-inforce that back wall also. I think you could shape it like so <| against the back of the rear pocket.... Just a suggestion..

Sorry for the keyboard drawing but the best I could do on the spur of the moment - probablly makes no sense to you - but I understand it...

mike
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Old 09-16-2011, 08:43 AM
  #8  
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Thanks, Mike. I just don't have the gun in front of me now, so I can't recall how much room there is to spare between the rear pocket and where the action slips through.
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Old 09-17-2011, 01:38 PM
  #9  
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To float a ML barrel is to leave a heavy barrel without much support. You may or may not find it necessary to bed part of your stock.

http://www.huntingnet.com/forum/blac...der-omega.html
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Old 09-17-2011, 07:30 PM
  #10  
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My suggestion is to invest in a laminated TH stock.
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