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Measuring Black powder load

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Measuring Black powder load

Old 10-07-2007, 10:09 AM
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Default Measuring Black powder load

Hi shooters, I'm new to this site and black powder hunting. As a long time center fire hunter and reloader I have a question about measuring accuracy of black powder. Do you measure the powder on a scale or go by the purchased measure saysand believe the manufacturer. I know in center fire rifle a tenth of a grain can mean the difference in a nail driver load or not. I have just purchased a T/C Omega and getting ready to go to the range and do some expermenting, so any suggestions are appreciate. Also I will be using American Pioneer Powder.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:33 AM
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Default RE: Measuring Black powder load

The see through powder measure will give you a measure of powder, by volume. This volume measure is normally all that is need to produce excellent accuracy. Some people have found that by taking a weighted charge and shooting, they are able to squeeze a little better accuracy out of the load.

Just remember, 100 grains of powder on the scale does not in most cases equal 100 grains from a Powder volumemeasure. For instance, when you pour a 100 grains of Triple Se7en from a volume measure it will weigh approximately 77.7 grains. So never just take for granted that a weighed charge is safe. You need to pour out, and take an average of about five or ten loads and then weigh according to the average of those loads.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:52 AM
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Default RE: Measuring Black powder load

shooterIII

Ask cayugad to post his "getting started" post it is excellent for the beginning ML shooter - he gives you a ton of information and it is safe...
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Old 10-07-2007, 11:26 AM
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Default RE: Measuring Black powder load

ARE YOU READY TO SHOOT YOUR RIFLE?[/b][/b]
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#1 unpack the rifle and look it over.
#2 read the manual cover to cover until you UNDERSTAND the contents of it
#3 clean the rifle including all parts
#4 use a quality breech plug grease and grease the threads of the breech plug then screw the breech plug back in to the rifle finger tight only... do not crank on that plug. In fact after I put them in finger tight, I then turn them back about an 1/8th of a turn.


You are now ready to prepare to shoot the rifle

#5 swab the barrel of the rifle with a patch with some alcohol on it.
#6 push a dry patch to the bottom of the barrel on a jag and fire a 209 primer into that patch. Then pull the patch and check it to make sure the fire from the primer is coming through the breech plug into the barrel
#7 shoot off three or more 209 primers. This will make sure the breech plug is clean and also put a light fowling in the barrel for you.

You are now ready to load the rifle

#8 measure out and place 100 grains of powder in the rifle in pellet or loose form, pouring or dropping this down the barrel.
#9 put the correct size projectile in to the correct size sabot and place that sabot into the crown of the muzzle. This is where I take a wad of patch material, put it over the nose of the projectile and push the projectile under the crown of the muzzle with my thumb. The patch material is more for the benefit of my thumb and not the projectile.
#10 with the long end of your short starter push the projectile into the bore of the rifle
#11 with your correct loading jag attached to the end of your range rod or ramrod push the projectile in as smooth a downward fashion as possible until you feel the projectile hit the powder charge. Make sure the projectile is seated firmly on the powder charge.
#12 leaving your ramrod still in the barrel of the rifle resting on the projectile, take a piece of masking tape and wrap the tape even to the end of the muzzle around your ramrod. This is called the Witness Mark and every time you load the rifle with the same powder charge and projectile you should reach this mark where the tape will be level to the muzzle of the rifle. With the Witness mark now in place on the ramrod

#13 REMOVE THE RAMROD FROM THE BARREL OF THE RIFLE


#14 place a 209 shotgun primer on the breech plug of the rifle located at the breech end of the barrel.
#15 With a target at 25 or 50 yards fire your first shot of out of the rifle
#16 take a patch with a cleaning solution and using a bore brush or cleaning jag on the end of a second ramrod preferably which you will use for swabbing the barrel only, run a wet patch down the barrel. When swabbing the barrel run the patch in short strokes starting at the muzzle. I like to run about four inches at a time in a back and fourth motion, increasing the length of the stroke and patch until I am finally all the way to the breech end of the rifle.
#17 run one or two dry patches down the barrel again in short strokes running from the muzzle to the breech to dry all the moisture out of the barrel. This will also remove extra fowling
#18. It is a good idea to take your time here. I like to swab the barrel clean, and then walk to the target and check the target before I even load the next shot. This gives the barrel time to cool. It also gives you time to calm down, relax and consider what you might have done right or wrong.
#19 now load your rifle in the exactsame manner as you did the first time. Make sure you reach your witness mark. Aim for the same spot on the target as you did the first time. Do not adjust your point of aim because of where your first shot hit. Try and hold the rifle the same as you did the first time, with the same sight picture, and fire the second shot.
#20 After seven to ten shots on the range take your breech plug wrench and just twist the breech plug back and fourth. You do not have to remove it. All you are doing is making sure that the breech plug is not seizing in the breech. And wipe off any excess fowling on the breech plug or that area with isopropyl alcohol on a patch or Q-tip
#21 After you have fired a few shots check the size of the group you are getting. If you are satisfied with it, great. You can decide if you want to increase/decrease the powder charge at this point, adjust the sights or scope (which I do not recommend until you are really happy with the group you are shooting), or just keep shooting the same load having fun....

I am sure I forgot a lot of steps and ask other posters to help me out, and you out by correcting me here... this should get you moving on the range...

I think this is what Sabotloader was talking about. Also, welcome to the forum and the sport..
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Old 10-07-2007, 01:29 PM
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Default RE: Measuring Black powder load

ORIGINAL: shooterIII

Hi shooters, I'm new to this site and black powder hunting. As a long time center fire hunter and reloader I have a question about measuring accuracy of black powder. Do you measure the powder on a scale or go by the purchased measure saysand believe the manufacturer. I know in center fire rifle a tenth of a grain can mean the difference in a nail driver load or not. I have just purchased a T/C Omega and getting ready to go to the range and do some expermenting, so any suggestions are appreciate. Also I will be using American Pioneer Powder.
Some people weigh black powder too, but in my experience (started shooting ML in 1954) this is basically a waste of time, because as big a variation in powder as five grains often makes very little difference in MV, as you can check out for yourself with a chronograph.

In addition, it is wise to use a volumetric measure, as many of the BP substitues are designed to be used on a volume-for-volume basis with BP. Therefore, many of the substitutes have very different weight per volume from black. For example,100 grains by volume of Pyrodex RS willweigh between 70 and 80 grains, depending on the LOT NUMBER, and a 100-grain measure of Pyrodex RSwill duplicate 100 grains volumetric measure of GOEX FFg black powder ballistically when used with identical projectiles.

While as little as 1/10 of a grain of smokeless powder can indeed make a real difference in a given application, the same DOES NOT APPLY to black powder. 1/10 of a grain weight of a given smokeless powder contains a WHOLE LOT MORE ENERGY than 1/10 of a grain weight of BP! If this weren't the case, smokeless's only advantage would be the lack of smoke.
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Old 10-07-2007, 03:14 PM
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Default RE: Measuring Black powder load

There is certainly no harm in pre-weighing charges and putting those pre-weighed charges in separate containers is nobig deal. I do both types of charge determinationdepending upon my intended use. If I'm going for the absolute tightest grouping possible on paper, I'll weigh not only the charge but the bullets as well. Preacher (from the old CVA forums) used toweigh every component involved in his loads including thecapsor primers. By all accounts,Preacher did some pretty fantastic shooting and obviously knew his stuff. And I am convinced that weighingDOES make a difference, especially when shooting powders like Swiss or T7 or BlackMag. 5 grains difference with one of those more energetic powders canhave dramatic effect on accuracy.

If you can weigh your charges, have easy access to the equipment needed, the necessary containers for transport, and a bit of time on your hands ... why NOT weigh? If you are of the mindset that good enough is plenty, then volumetric will certainly suffice for hunting loads.
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Old 10-08-2007, 07:04 PM
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Default RE: Measuring Black powder load

Thanks guys for all the info, this really helps. I was having a hard time getting my head around the volumn measure thing, but I think i'm understanding it now.

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