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recoil

Old 05-13-2004, 02:45 PM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
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Default RE: recoil

Its when you start to finch! Its a bad idea to shoot any gun so much at one time that it hurts you. It could cause bad thing in the future. I have a friend that had to "run with the big boys" and bought a .338 RUM. He was a ok shot before this new guy, now he can't hit a thing with any gun. He might as well just hunt with a shot gun because his pattern at a target looks the same. Its sad to see this happen to people, thats why I say shoot a gun that you can handle. If you can't handle a 338 or etc. shot a smaller gun. People have killed elk with a 243. I personlly think it a little light but if you can hit the animal in the right spot it will kill them every time. If you shoot a 338 bad it may kill the animal but you might not have any meat left! I shoot a 300 RUM and it is much better on my shoulder now because I put a custom brake on it. It doen't hurt anymore and that when I got better at shooting it.
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Old 05-13-2004, 10:54 PM
  #12  
 
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Default RE: recoil

In general,

Barring prior injury, and provided one has the fundamentals of rifle construction/set up/fit and the techniques for handling higher recoil firearms covered (most folks just shoot "out of the box" and do not address any of them), then the issue of felt recoil and one's ability to handle felt recoil varies almost entirely by the individual's mental state and attitude.

With that said, the "bigger boys" are not intended for use as gallery guns nor target rifles to run a 100 rounds thru in one setting. Once you have established that the rifle is sighted in and you have demonstrated that you can "hit" with it from a few different field positions, then there is really no need to go any further -- volume shooting will not improve accuracy in this case. End on a good note and put it away and then switch over and reward yourself and play with something more "fun and easy" like a 30-06 etc. on down to 22LR. Always strive to "wrap up" feeling good about things, even if things go really well and you'll be finishing sooner than you expected.

At MagFest 2003, a group of us weighing from 165 to 230 shot: 7mmRemMag, 300WinMag, 338WinMag, 375H&HMag, 416RemMag, 416 Rigby, 458WinMag, and 500 NitroExpress --- everyone's general opinion was recoil? Really not a big deal! Then again the issues mentioned above for managing recoil were implemented, monitored, and enforced VERY closely --- it was a hoot.

Quoting HuntingGirl, "I kind of like a rifle that kicks a bit!" [Aggrrrr!]

EKM
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Old 05-15-2004, 09:55 AM
  #13  
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Default RE: recoil

Being able to handle recoil is a mental state of mind. You have to lean into the rifle and take the recoil if you expect to hit anything with it. You have to mentally tell yourself no matter what I'm going to hit that spot I'm aiming at. Saying that, all manners of calibers can fall into that catagory. I've seen people flinch from rifles that have no kick. They expect to be hammered everytime they pull the trigger no matter what they shoot. It's in the mind at the beginnning. Theres also the other factors of stocks, weight of rifle, and eye relief on scopes.

An ill made gun or low weight magnum rifles can cause some serious recoil. The first 300 winmag I ever owned I bought it cheap at a elk banquet for $300. It was a remington ADL synthetic stocked 300win mag and I tell you it was the most horrible rifle for recoil I've ever owned. It didn't sit long in the safe before it was traded off.

But along those lines recoil has never bothered me more than muzzle blast. Muzzle breaks are not an option for me. On a bench rifle with ear muffs okay but in a hunting situation who is going to be wearing hearing protection or take the time to put it on before they shoot. They would be absolutely dangerous if you couldn't hear someone yelling at a distance if the situation became dangerous.

Most people will not have good results from recoil from light weight rifles without muzzlebrakes. The longer you can hold that rifle steady as the bullet leaves the barrel the more accurate you will be. You flinch you miss. If your going to shoot a powerful caliber make sure it's in a rifle that has some weight behind it.

I don't mind the kick I just like to hear after the shot. lol
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Old 05-15-2004, 01:41 PM
  #14  
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Default RE: recoil

Felt recoil or torture test, I have felt them both.

Last year I was geting ready for my mule deer hunt in Co. My plans was to take my 300 Win Mag and 30-06 in case something happen to the 300. I wanted new brass for both when I started working up my loads, so I bought 100 shells for each. I wanted to powder form each shell for each gun prior to working up my actual hunting loads. I started with the 300, loaded all 100 shells, and went to the bench. I might add, I have two targets on my property, one at 100 yds and 30 yds, because I wasn't interested in accuracy to start, I shot at the shortest one. It didn't matter because after that thing got thru stomping me I didn't care what I hit.

The 300 is a Weatherby Vang. and now I remember why I hadn't shot it in the last 15 or 20 yrs. After 20 rounds, I cut me a piece of foam rubber that was left over from having my house carpeted, and slid it under my shirt. Believe it was 5/8s' in. thick, after the next 10 or 15 shots, I cut another piece of carpet mat and taped the two together and slid them under my shirt. After another 10 shots, I cleaned it, boxed it back up, and put it up for another 20 yrs.

Loaded 100 rds for my 30-06 and 7mm-08. Worked up loads and went to Co. Kilt me a deer with my ole 06 while in Co. and put that 300 to bed.

Felt recoil, you betcha, that thing stomped me like a mule in a hornets nest. And to think, I used to love that gun. I'll probably just hunt with the 08 this year, 243 next yr, 223 the next and so on. Can't take that puninshment any more, may be all that I've taken over the years.

As the ole saying goes, "It's hard to remember that you're there to drain the swamp, when you're up to your rear in alligators." My suggestion, as others have said, if you can't shoot because of flinching (pain), shoot something that don't hurt you.

dog1
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Old 05-16-2004, 01:48 AM
  #15  
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Default RE: recoil

Barring prior injury, and provided one has the fundamentals of rifle construction/set up/fit and the techniques for handling higher recoil firearms covered (most folks just shoot "out of the box" and do not address any of them), then the issue of felt recoil and one's ability to handle felt recoil varies almost entirely by the individual's mental state and attitude.
As the ole saying goes, "It's hard to remember that you're there to drain the swamp, when you're up to your rear in alligators." My suggestion, as others have said, if you can't shoot because of flinching (pain), shoot something that don't hurt you.
Good posts IMO.....Also for those that have a flinch problem, with practice that can be fixed. I feel pretty sure that ELKampMaster knows well the training it takes to avoid flinch. Flinch is nothing to be ashamed of, and very common. Also is infact an initial reflex action....it takes training and range time to overcome. My late dad who was a military lifer taught me when I was young to avoid flinch by dry firing if there was a problem.... to avoid that reflex reaction. Thankfully I was what dad called a "natural" Some do not care for that method...So.... Shoot targets in off season and practice...that way you know that, you can do what is needed when you have to take that shot. Respect the animal, and even though you know you have one in the pipe, and more in the chamber.......Make one shot count please!
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Old 05-16-2004, 12:33 PM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
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Default RE: recoil

Christine B,

How is your 375 H&H doing?
Have you taken it out for exercise lately?

EKM
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Old 05-16-2004, 06:03 PM
  #17  
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Default RE: recoil

EKM, It is doing just fine. I have to admit that my first shot after it was given to me even though I was prepared dang near put me on my butt! LOL However, the ammo that was also given to me were 300 grainers. I did go good however with one heck of a bruise. I am just a tad stubborn. Hee Hee Now I take it out periodically and shoot 2 groups of 3, just to know that I am accurate....and am using 200 grainers now.....major difference. [8D]
Most of the time it has its spot of affluence in the gun safe waiting for that African Safari or Grizz hunt someday. I have not put a scope on it yet, however it is amazing how accurate it is open sighted!
For the most my I will stick with my trusty 30.06 w/ 180 grainers. Gotta love that rifle as it as never let me down! Alway one shot, one kill. My Pre-64 Winchester 375 H&H mag is to much gun for Whitetails IMO. LOL Can't imagine why........ I am proud that I know if and when I need it I am proficient enough to do what would need to be done. Thanks for asking...... I knew that you would remember my friend.
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Old 05-17-2004, 02:36 PM
  #18  
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Default RE: recoil

EKM makes a good point. You can fire the big kickers enough to be sure where they hit and that you can handle the gun and that the load is right. Then do your recreational shooting with a caliber that is fun for you to shoot. For some it may be a 7mm Mag and for some, like me, a 257 Roberts, 250 Savage or one of the Varmit calibers like 223 or 22-250 is where my enjoyment level starts. I use an extra pad in my shooting vest for sighting in rifles with heavy recoil. As many have said, I have never felt the kick of a gun while shooting at game. I don't enjoy shooting even my 308 and 30-06 from the bench without an extra recoil pad. My 308 is the Browning A bolt lightweight stalker and it hits pretty hard on both ends. My 06 Pump does not SEEM to kick as much as my 308. The 06 pumps fit me well.
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Old 05-17-2004, 07:24 PM
  #19  
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: The Last Frontier
Posts: 26
Default RE: recoil

This is a good thread and even better responses. There are so many factors, pain threshold, caliber, grain, recoil pad, etc. I would have to agree, find the right mix between enjoyable to shoot with enough stopping power. I have a 30-06 with a stock, as hard as a rock I might add, recoil pad and it is good for 15 or so shots (180gr) before you start to feel it. The funny thing is you notice the kick and decibel level at the range, but I have yet to remember when I am in the field saying, wow that hurt or it was loud.

Everyones advice about flinching is dead on. If you are worried about the recoil, you are likely to jerk your shot and miss. Or worse end up with a wounded animal that you spend the rest of the day tracking.

I have shot my brother-in-laws 338 and his 375 at the range and that is not an enjoyable experience. . If I shoot it 3-5 times and they are within 2-3 inches of one another, I figure good enough. However they are necessary if you are going brown bear hunting.
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Old 05-17-2004, 07:39 PM
  #20  
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Default RE: recoil

MagFest II???
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