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summer

Old 08-05-2019, 07:10 PM
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Just thought I would share. I know many of you are planning your fall hunts. This is the time of the year that drives my reason for elk hunting. Every day I cut and bale hay. Every night my fuzzy friends poop on the windrows, wrestle the bales, and just plain break the bales - eat some- then. smear the bale across the field. One year four of them ate an entire haystack. I reload shells and buy fireworks just so they know I appreciate them every day during the summer.

When the last bale goes in the barn the roles reverse. By then the elk have started the fall migration and have moved lower and to to the north slopes where the grass is tender and the temps are cool. My drive is not trophies and adventure like many of you but the burning need for revenge. No hill to high; no canyon too deep; no snow too deep and no temps too cold for 35 days of hell and torture to pay those thieving fuzzballs back.

Hope you are all successful and know that behind every elk is a very grumpy rancher that doesn't appreciate the elk the same way you do.
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Old 08-05-2019, 07:37 PM
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Certainly a unique view that many people, who haven't farmed or been around farms, don't understand.

I know allot of hunters look down on the crop damage control "hunts" that I participate in. But thats a Farmers paycheck and livelihood. It all depends on how you look at it!

Personally I understand the need for damage permits, and harvesting deer throughout the growing seasons etc. It's provided allot of extra meat for myself and a few families I've helped out with it as well.

But I also enjoy and love to hunt in the fall too. I'm not a "trophy" hunter and likely never will be. Just enjoy the chase.

-Jake
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Old 08-05-2019, 10:13 PM
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Any pictures you can share? Must be a sight to see.
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Old 08-06-2019, 01:42 AM
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Most of my hunting is dealing with and trying to prevent crop damage. I've spent many a night sitting guard on a ripe grain field.

Here Hogs are the main culprits and ours are way smart. They wait until a ragging storm or the darkest nights to raid a field. I've watched them follow a zig-zag path that takes them as far as possible away from high seats and shooting towers.

I spent weeks watching over a field of Strawberries, they were finally harvested, crated stacked and awaiting a morning pickup. A serious thunderstorm moved through, vision was maybe 10 yards. The next morning the aftermath was horrendous, the Hogs had tipped over most of the crates and destroyed almost all of the crop.

I've seen Hogs destroy five acres of ripe grain or Corn in a single night.

The Fox get into the stacked Hay rolls and set up housekeeping. A half dozen rolls reek of Ammonia, the Cows refuse to eat the stuff. I've hunted Fox in a graveyard. Fox are diggers, it doesn't take much imagination to imagine what the possibilities are. One farmer was raising a thousand eating Ducks. The Fox hit him almost every night. It took the Fox maybe four months to wipe him out. Those Fox were smarter than me, I only got one, I hit it with my Jeep by accident.
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Old 08-06-2019, 08:26 AM
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My home garden is shot. The deer ate almost everything that came up and have even eaten some of the green tomato's. Ironically last year was the first year in about 20 that I didn't get my deer. They have over run the Island I live on and are in the yard every night eating gardens along with shrubs and soon they will be camped out in my orchard pulling off the apples that are low enough. I have lived here for almot 18 years and never had this much of a problem. I even did the fish line 3 tier fence that always worked before but they must just jump it now and it always used to keep them out. Once figured out the word probably spread that it was good food and easy to get to. That first doe that got over the fence probably taught her fawns and then they in turn taught their fawns. Now the whole herd knows about my garden.....
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Old 08-06-2019, 08:39 AM
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MudderChuck, those sound like some very fun challenges. any pictures?
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Old 08-06-2019, 08:40 AM
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Bummer on the garden CI. Can you get any depredation permits?
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Old 08-06-2019, 09:02 AM
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Originally Posted by CalHunter View Post
Bummer on the garden CI. Can you get any depredation permits?
No not for a home non commercial garden. The Island is flat about 10 miles long and no more than 2 miles wide. The land is mainly agricultural and wooded on the interior and with vacation and high end homes along the water where I live. Almost all the land is private and there are way too many posted signs to allow a reasonable harvest to keep numbers down. Winters are harsh here in Vermont but the Island actually has a milder climate due to the influence of Lake Champlain which is huge. The state understands we have too many deer and issue more and more doe permits but since most of the land is posted not that many deer are harvested. I am thinking next year that I may have to put a fixed 5 to 6 foot fence up if I want to keep them out. It seems as time goes on they are getting smarter and more brazen. I have 4 ornamental cedars that grow tall and skinny. The bases of all 4 are now skin and bones as high as the deer can reach. That started last year during the winter when deer really go for cedar and they are still eating it which is strange since there is so much other stuff to eat.
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Old 08-06-2019, 09:04 AM
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I really think most people have NO clue how much damage wildlife does to crops, be it elk, deer, bears crows, raccoons or??
I have part time farmed and friends with many full time farmers and I have seen acres of damage from bears in one field, I have sen acres of damage from crows
you just cannot imagine how a flock of crows every day for weeks , how much they can eat!
this is why there is crop insurance, and why farmers in most places can legally control some of the numbers of things that eat there crops!
nature of the beast
you plant food, things will come to eat it!
Killing things for eating, things we plant? has a double edge sword view I guess to some too!


also,
yrs ago it was the MAIN reason most farmers allowed hunters on there lands, to help curb the damage
but some how, hunters ruined it , they started doing damages of there own to lands, and the game changed!, law suits, thieft, and lack of consideration , ruin it on the whole in most farmer
add in so many these days will PAY money to hunt good farm lands
and its a odd sort we all enjoy !
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Old 08-06-2019, 04:27 PM
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Originally Posted by CalHunter View Post
MudderChuck, those sound like some very fun challenges. any pictures?
I don't take many pictures, I'm really bad at it. Though I do have a new phone I'm learning how to use. I do have a few good Dog pictures.

My son isn't really into hunting, he is the talented photographer. My brother actually made some money with wildlife photography. I fix things, shoot straight and tell stories.
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