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why over pay

Old 02-23-2016, 12:52 PM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by Uncle Nicky View Post
Standard is 15% on cheaper trips, and 10% on a high-end trip. Obviously more if you felt the guide went above & beyond, and less if you think they slacked off.
And where, Sir, did you come up with those percentages? I've been around a long time and never seen those numbers or any others, other than people theorizing on threads such as this. What do you call a "cheap trip" and what is a "high-end trip", as I've also never seen those terms mentioned anywhere before, or is that just your philosophy?

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Old 02-23-2016, 05:29 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Uncle Nicky View Post
Standard is 15% on cheaper trips, and 10% on a high-end trip. Obviously more if you felt the guide went above & beyond, and less if you think they slacked off.
Yes I also would like to know what you consider a high end trip and what is a cheaper trip ? I believe everyone has a different opinion of that one.
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Old 02-24-2016, 04:29 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Topgun 3006 View Post
And where, Sir, did you come up with those percentages? I've been around a long time and never seen those numbers or any others, other than people theorizing on threads such as this. What do you call a "cheap trip" and what is a "high-end trip", as I've also never seen those terms mentioned anywhere before, or is that just your philosophy?
Dear Lord, someone forgot to chain the junkyard dog up again. This has been my experience over the years (probably 10 guided hunts and 100 charter fishing trips). Charter boat captains where I have fished (Cape Cod, Chesapeake, NJ shore, Outer Banks, Florida, Lake Erie, Ontario, Huron & Michigan, etc) usually post a sign with tipping policies on their boats, 15-20%. I realize this is a hunting forum, not a fishing forum, so here are a couple links I dug up quickly.

http://www.outdoorlife.com/articles/...-hunting-guide

http://www.huntthenorth.com/guidetipping.html

http://www.doublethunting.com/faqs/

I also have friends who guide, and they claim they make almost nothing and depend on tips to survive. They've told me the industry standard is about 15%, some folks are more generous than others, if you question my claim, let me know and I will e-mail you their name, rank, serial number, and e-mail addresses. They've also told me they remember the stiffs more than they remember those who do tip, if they ever come back.

My theory on what is a "cheaper" trip? Anything under $2,000. It's all relative though, as mentioned, if I feel like they gave 110%, I'll leave a nicer gratuity, if I feel like their heart wasn't in it, I'll leave a smaller gratuity. As far as leaving a smaller tip on a more expensive hunt, the guide/cooks/outfitters know that not everyone is a high-roller, most of us save all year to go on a $5,000+ elk or moose hunt, and they are not expecting a $750 tip, but would be thrilled if you left $500.

Last edited by Uncle Nicky; 02-24-2016 at 04:52 AM.
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Old 02-24-2016, 06:22 AM
  #34  
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The "standard" is 10-15% based on my experience talking to outfitters (guides will most likely be shy discussing tips). Where this standard came from? Beats me, my only guess is a carry over from the other "standard" of tipping a waitress/waiter 15% on a meal. However in that case it's actually coded into the pay laws.

Guides make little money, often only $100/day. for me the tip when hunting has TONS of variables:

- type of hunt? I've been on a guided whitetail hunt where morning and evening they loaded up the truck with 5-6 guys and the "guide" drove you around and dropped you off at stands, then came back and got you at the end of the sit. Vs a guided elk hunt where you are with the guide 14 hours a day, calling glassing stalking etc.

- cost of the hunt. A $25K sheep hunt vs a $200/day deer hunt

also don't forget the cooks, horse wranglers, packers etc.

It can get expensive quick

It is however part of the game.
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Old 02-24-2016, 12:36 PM
  #35  
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so you spend $5000 on a hunt $700 on tags then your expected to tip the guide $500 to $1000 (per the outfitter) extra for something you already paid for dearly. Does not seem right to me !!
In my opinion the outfitter needs to pay his guides, cooks, etc. a better wage, and not guilt the client into making things right with the people he hires. I understand the guide being upset when he works his tail off and doesn't get much back to show for it but he needs to take it up with the guy who hired him. I read a story the other day about a waitress in Florida who has been arrested and being prosecuted for changing tip amounts on credit card tickets. She stole over $1000 before she got caught. She said she felt some customers did not tip her good enough so she felt it was justified. If you don't feel your being paid fairly take it up with the person who hired you. Its not fair to get upset with the customer, they already paid. These employers of jobs like this need to give more to there people and a little less in there own pockets.
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Old 02-24-2016, 01:09 PM
  #36  
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There are many high end restaurants around here and other places I have been that include the price of the tip in the bill. It will tell you on the menu that it is done. Some will only do that for large parties eating together and some for all customers. They are going to get you one way or the other, if they do away with tipping and pay the staff more you will still pay about the same because they will increase the price of the food, or the hunt or whatever.
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Old 02-24-2016, 01:16 PM
  #37  
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I've never hired a guide in North America and don't ever intend to but I have done so in Canada and Africa because the law requires it. In both Canada and Africa I have done 2x1 trips and they work well if the other hunter is someone you know and trust. In my case it was always my father. I had no problem letting him take the shot if he wanted and he had no trouble letting me take the shot if I wanted. The scenario isn't ideal for most hunts but for family members who get along it works well and it can cut a lot of $$$ off the tab.

As to tipping, I always budget 10-15% but I don't always give that much. There are a lot of variables that come into play.
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Old 02-24-2016, 01:25 PM
  #38  
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I agree smitty0538 and there was no need to be snarky Uncle Nicky, since nobody other than you may be an expert on this and everyone is just asking and answering questions! I guess I was more than generous on the hunt I went on in Wyoming last September. It was a $2900 horseback hunt for 5 days that lasted 4 and the outfitter was my guide, as well as for my buddy. I tipped him $350 when IMHO since he did the work himself, his wife did the cooking, and he already got the entire $2900. I probably didn't need to offer much more than a thank you for a job well done. However, we had a great time, killed two real nice mulies, and we were treated like family. I'm a DIY guy and that was only the second and probably last guided hunt I've done in 63 years of hunting, so it does sound like I would meet with your approval for what I gave him.

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Old 02-24-2016, 02:52 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Oldtimr View Post
There are many high end restaurants around here and other places I have been that include the price of the tip in the bill. It will tell you on the menu that it is done. Some will only do that for large parties eating together and some for all customers. They are going to get you one way or the other, if they do away with tipping and pay the staff more you will still pay about the same because they will increase the price of the food, or the hunt or whatever.
Sad but true old timer they will try but not get it from me, that is why I do not go to high end restaurants, Pro football games any more etc. I can easily afford these things and high $$$$ outfitted hunts. But I will not out of principle because than I feel I am part of the problem. Maybe if more people would do like I do these things we once enjoyed to do or would like to enjoy would come back down to be a reasonable cost. These hunts should not just be for the rich and sadly they have become that way. Some of us choose to pay these high prices and it then becomes the norm . That hurts the regular guy who would love to do it but cant afford the inflated price.
And thanks top gun 3006
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Old 02-24-2016, 03:22 PM
  #40  
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I look at it this way...a guided trip is a luxury, most of us can probably get by with a DIY scenario, maybe just need a nudge in the right direction. But like flags stated, if you plan to hunt in Canada (which I have a number of times), you have to hire an outfitter.

But it's not much different than eating your dinner each night; you can cook at home for cheap and clean up all the pots, pans & dishes; spend a little more and get take out; or go all out and sit down and be waited on, and leave a tip. If I can't afford or don't want to pay the tip, then I don't dine out.

Like I mentioned, I have a few friends who guide and run charter boats, and I've been to their homes, NOBODY is getting rich in that business, once you factor in the cost of leases, equipment, gas, food, guides, insurance....

By no means am I a rich man, but if you do your homework, you can find decent outfitters who are willing to work with your budget, but it does take some effort and maybe compromises.

Last edited by Uncle Nicky; 02-24-2016 at 04:21 PM.
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