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New to outfitting, looking for your advice.

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New to outfitting, looking for your advice.

Old 02-20-2015, 02:27 AM
  #11  
Spike
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Originally Posted by Rob in VT View Post
Best of luck to you. If you can score two bull moose tags let me know, I'll be your first client :-) Looking to take my daughter of a moose hunt in a couple of years once we find the right hunt. I hear NB has good Bulls.
You would have to apply for a non-resident tag online or by phone, but if you ever did get a tag by draw contact me at munnbrosoutdoors.ca and I would guide you no charge, except license cost.
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Old 02-20-2015, 02:34 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by CalHunter View Post
Interesting question. What price range(s) are you running your hunts and how competitive are you compared to other outfitters in NB or other provinces?

Something to consider is which group of hunters you want to target? If it's wealthier hunters, put together a package that would appeal to them at the sports shows that wealthy hunters attend. If it's the working man group of hunters, maybe offer something that would appeal to them such as some kind of group discount, no extra charge for filling a wolf tag (if applicable), etc.

If you're targeting HuntingNet hunters, maybe some kind of discount to HuntingNet members. Maybe advertise in certain hunting magazines and offer some kind of deal to subscribers.

Something else you might consider is some kind of reward/discount for referrals and/or returning hunters. Refer a buddy and you can come back at XX% discount and hunt with your buddy. Come back for a 2nd hunt and get whatever reward.

There's lots of possibilities. It would depend on who you're trying to attract to your business.
I charge $1750/week per person, which includes guides, accommodations, meals and license fees. I really like your suggestions and I am putting them in action as we speak. I am only a 3 star accomodation located along the world famous Miramichi river,but have future plans for more.
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Old 02-20-2015, 03:30 AM
  #13  
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Munna, some advice. In the long run you are doing no service giving away hunts. To me, the biggest problem by far and away that outfitters are too often cash strapped. This leads to two problems: outfitters that make promises they can't keep, and overbooking/under staffed. Never promise anything you cannot absolutely deliver, and don't try to book every person that wants to do a hunt. Some people may not fit with what you offer, and that is ok. Spend your money on things you can control, staff, accommodations, food etc as you cannot control the weather and animals.
It is imperative to be honest with people, not just in outfitting but in life in general. Just tell it like it is. I believe if you work hard and be honest, you can be successful at any occupation.
I would certainly look at additional revenue streams and not get yourself in a position financially that forces you to make improper business decisions. Outfitting is a very expensive business with large associated cost. One year the USFS didn't grade and a late frost heaved many jagged rocks in the road to the trailhead. We blew 11 tires on horse trailers/trucks through the season, the down time with paid staff plus tire cost added up quick, things happen. You want to expand your client base, but think in terms of controlled expansion. Always have a plan in place to put money back into the business in equipment, staff, upgrades etc.
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Old 02-20-2015, 05:29 AM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by TwoBear View Post
Munna, some advice. In the long run you are doing no service giving away hunts. To me, the biggest problem by far and away that outfitters are too often cash strapped. This leads to two problems: outfitters that make promises they can't keep, and overbooking/under staffed. Never promise anything you cannot absolutely deliver, and don't try to book every person that wants to do a hunt. Some people may not fit with what you offer, and that is ok. Spend your money on things you can control, staff, accommodations, food etc as you cannot control the weather and animals.
It is imperative to be honest with people, not just in outfitting but in life in general. Just tell it like it is. I believe if you work hard and be honest, you can be successful at any occupation.
I would certainly look at additional revenue streams and not get yourself in a position financially that forces you to make improper business decisions. Outfitting is a very expensive business with large associated cost. One year the USFS didn't grade and a late frost heaved many jagged rocks in the road to the trailhead. We blew 11 tires on horse trailers/trucks through the season, the down time with paid staff plus tire cost added up quick, things happen. You want to expand your client base, but think in terms of controlled expansion. Always have a plan in place to put money back into the business in equipment, staff, upgrades etc.
Thank you very much for the advice. I plan on small steps and I do have secondary work, to make up slow times. When I have any profits it has been going into the business, but there is a lot of cost.
I appreciate all advice and I am always looking to learn more.
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Old 02-20-2015, 09:52 AM
  #15  
Nontypical Buck
 
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I am not an outfitter, nor am I a guide. However, I am a guy that takes guided hunts and have some insight from that point of view.

You have been given some excellent advice. Understand your target market. Do your best to understand the nature of prospective hunters. Some guys want a higher quality hunting experience, some do not care about anything but a trophy to display, a very few want high-end accommodations, some guys just want a cheap hunt. Everyone wants a clean safe camp, and good food. Be very clear about what you actually have to offer and avoid "wishful thinking".

Giving away a hunt probably will not impress anyone except the individual that takes your offer. I have seen fellows that become "regulars" on some hunting boards that have done well at starting their outfitting services (most notably on African hunting sites). After they are known for a while and exhibit some common sense and good manners they entice some with a discounted hunt or a group hunt. A few happy hunters that spend a lot of time on the internet can spread the word of mouth quickly. An example would be Tootabi Safaris on Africahunting.com and accuratereloading.com. He has not been around long at all but he got the right guys talking.

Work hard and good fortune may just find you.

Last edited by Big Uncle; 02-20-2015 at 09:58 AM.
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Old 02-22-2015, 07:09 PM
  #16  
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A lot of great advice. Just to second, "In the long run you are doing no service giving away hunts." Don't undersell yourself. A mistake many make, starting out in many businesses, is that they under sell to try to keep the hunt cheaper, hoping to get more people. Your many years of experience as a guide stands on its own and there is no use starting a business if you aren't going to work toward maintaining solvency from the beginning. As stated above, donating a hunt to a reputable organization is one thing, don't just give them away to whomever to just be a nice guy. Be service oriented AND a business man at the same time.
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Old 02-23-2015, 06:22 AM
  #17  
Spike
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Originally Posted by wyomingtrapper View Post
A lot of great advice. Just to second, "In the long run you are doing no service giving away hunts." Don't undersell yourself. A mistake many make, starting out in many businesses, is that they under sell to try to keep the hunt cheaper, hoping to get more people. Your many years of experience as a guide stands on its own and there is no use starting a business if you aren't going to work toward maintaining solvency from the beginning. As stated above, donating a hunt to a reputable organization is one thing, don't just give them away to whomever to just be a nice guy. Be service oriented AND a business man at the same time.
The hardest part in my area is trying to get people to apply for moose tags. Where it is on a draw only system not many want to put much money up, in chance of a tag. So I am trying to promote the moose hunt more and more.
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Old 02-23-2015, 08:01 PM
  #18  
Spike
 
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Originally Posted by TwoBear View Post
Munna, some advice. In the long run you are doing no service giving away hunts. To me, the biggest problem by far and away that outfitters are too often cash strapped. This leads to two problems: outfitters that make promises they can't keep, and overbooking/under staffed. Never promise anything you cannot absolutely deliver, and don't try to book every person that wants to do a hunt. Some people may not fit with what you offer, and that is ok. Spend your money on things you can control, staff, accommodations, food etc as you cannot control the weather and animals.
It is imperative to be honest with people, not just in outfitting but in life in general. Just tell it like it is. I believe if you work hard and be honest, you can be successful at any occupation.
I would certainly look at additional revenue streams and not get yourself in a position financially that forces you to make improper business decisions. Outfitting is a very expensive business with large associated cost. One year the USFS didn't grade and a late frost heaved many jagged rocks in the road to the trailhead. We blew 11 tires on horse trailers/trucks through the season, the down time with paid staff plus tire cost added up quick, things happen. You want to expand your client base, but think in terms of controlled expansion. Always have a plan in place to put money back into the business in equipment, staff, upgrades etc.
I couldn't agree more. I made the mistake of under charging when I was just starting out, and then when things did take off I had a hard time finding extra money to upgrade camp, stands, Atvs, etc.
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Old 02-25-2015, 05:58 AM
  #19  
Spike
 
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I agree with what everyone else has been saying, don't give away hunts with the intent of gaining repeat clientele. It's a different story if it's to a charity and you're doing it for the right reasons.

The other thing I would STRONGLY recommend is keeping updated with pictures. There are very few businesses where pictures are more telling of what to expect. When websites fail to update their picture section for a more than a year it looks like they are hiding something. This is for your website, facebook, instagram, etc. You can't have too many pictures.
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Old 02-25-2015, 08:15 AM
  #20  
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Not an outfitter either but I have been in business. What TwoBear & b stricker said IMO applies to any business. Once a price structure is established do not "beat it up".

Good luck on your venture.
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