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pass-through vs. internally expended energy?

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pass-through vs. internally expended energy?

Old 01-10-2017, 08:52 AM
  #21  
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I want a big hole, all the way through, with the heart in the middle.

The lungs are just a back up chance for a little mistake. NOT a plan.

Last edited by Jack Ryan; 01-10-2017 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 01-10-2017, 09:57 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by BrushyPines
A lot of sweat and skeeters, Rock. It's very common here, during the month of October (bow season), for the high to be in the high 70's to low 80's. I'll usually hunt opening weekend then either wait till a cold front moves in or gun season starts. Doesn't make any sense to be sweating constantly and fighting skeeters up in a tree IMO.
oh we get plenty of that here too.
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Old 01-10-2017, 10:27 AM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by BrushyPines View Post
A lot of sweat and skeeters, Rock. It's very common here, during the month of October (bow season), for the high to be in the high 70's to low 80's. I'll usually hunt opening weekend then either wait till a cold front moves in or gun season starts. Doesn't make any sense to be sweating constantly and fighting skeeters up in a tree IMO.


Originally Posted by rockport
oh we get plenty of that here too.
You aint kiddin!!! But I pity the guys hunting early archery in Florida, Louisiana, Lower Alabama, basically all the southern coastal states. The skeeters down there should have to file flight plans with the FAA!!! South Central Pa is pretty nasty during early archery as well...
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Old 01-10-2017, 11:58 AM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by super_hunt54
You aint kiddin!!! But I pity the guys hunting early archery in Florida, Louisiana, Lower Alabama, basically all the southern coastal states. The skeeters down there should have to file flight plans with the FAA!!! South Central Pa is pretty nasty during early archery as well...
Haha heard that! MS delta is ridiculous too. There are literally speakers installed every where that produce a loud humming noise and supposedly the skeeters cant stand it.
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Old 01-10-2017, 12:54 PM
  #25  
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Skeeters get me more up north(Ontario) now the chiggers down south tear me up.

Might have something to do with the times of year Ive been there.

I'm pretty sure if I lived down south my solution would be too move north.

Last edited by rockport; 01-10-2017 at 12:58 PM.
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Old 01-10-2017, 01:09 PM
  #26  
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Can someone explain this "internally expended energy" concept in a way that makes sense?

Seems to me that on a pass through shot, the bullet to hits the first shoulder at, for example, 2000 ft lbs of energy, half way through, it's got 1750 ft lbs of energy, and on exit it hits the far shoulder at, for example, 1500 ft lbs of energy. How is this hypothetical bullet not striking the animal harder than one that hits the first shoulder at 2000 ft lbs, half way through, it's down to 1000 ft lbs, and by the time it makes it to the second shoulder, its down to zero?

Doesn't it make more sense that, as the bullet is transversing from one side of the animal to the other, the bullet is striking each bit of flesh, bone and organ within the animal at any given nanosecond with whatever energy that bullet possesses at that time?
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Old 01-10-2017, 01:23 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by ipscshooter
Can someone explain this "internally expended energy" concept in a way that makes sense?

Seems to me that on a pass through shot, the bullet to hits the first shoulder at, for example, 2000 ft lbs of energy, half way through, it's got 1750 ft lbs of energy, and on exit it hits the far shoulder at, for example, 1500 ft lbs of energy. How is this hypothetical bullet not striking the animal harder than one that hits the first shoulder at 2000 ft lbs, half way through, it's down to 1000 ft lbs, and by the time it makes it to the second shoulder, its down to zero?

Doesn't it make more sense that, as the bullet is transversing from one side of the animal to the other, the bullet is striking each bit of flesh, bone and organ within the animal at any given nanosecond with whatever energy that bullet possesses at that time?
I think the idea is bullet expansion creates enough surface area to use its energy inside the target rather than waste its energy after it exits.
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Old 01-10-2017, 01:39 PM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by rockport
I think the idea is bullet expansion creates enough surface area to use its energy inside the target rather than waste its energy after it exits.
Sounds to me like a theory made up to promote the sale of firearms chambered for cartridges too weak to achieve pass through or someone trying to justify why he doesn't like shooting a 7mm Rem Mag.

I still think that if you are using an appropriately designed hunting bullet, a round that hits the front shoulder at 2000 ft lbs and the far shoulder at 1000 ft lbs is hitting that animal harder and more effectively than a round that hits the front shoulder at 2000 ft lbs and doesn't even make it all the way to the far shoulder.
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Old 01-10-2017, 02:01 PM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by ipscshooter
Sounds to me like a theory made up to promote the sale of firearms chambered for cartridges too weak to achieve pass through or someone trying to justify why he doesn't like shooting a 7mm Rem Mag.
Well all I can tell you is that is incorrect.

My deer gun could easily zip right through but the bullet is instead designed to expend its energy inside the target.

The reason a bullet hits an animal at 2000fps and doesn't make it through is precisely because it is doing more damage.

Doesn't matter what gun you are shooting the concept is the same.

I don't necessarily prefer it that way but its absolutely real.

Last edited by rockport; 01-10-2017 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 01-10-2017, 02:33 PM
  #30  
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\ I used a "slow" and in a heavy 200 grain bullet on deer, when I was younger and still do on occasion.
For quite some time my bullets would pass through and all the deer with an all pass through was immediately knocked down and the deer killed . I was so effective that I never fired for the lungs and fired at the high shoulder area.
Then checking one deer, I found a lump on the far side of the shot. It was a bullet. I cut the hide and found the bullet had expanded to twice its width. It went from .35 inch bullet to a .70 inch bullet.

It was effective enough for me. Never did go to a lung shot. Never did worry about what other's did. And never worried about being different.

Last edited by Valentine; 01-10-2017 at 02:49 PM.
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