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Another way to ruin hunting

Old 05-21-2010, 02:18 AM
  #71  
Typical Buck
 
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Originally Posted by Father Forkhorn View Post
Harshly criticizing young hunters in forum posts is a good way to do it. We all need to be aware that the person we're criticizing in a post may be a young hunter who makes the biggest mistakes because they are still learning. We don't want to discourage a young person from hunting, because it weakens us as a whole.

I can point out two posting mistakes we've made in particular:

1. Hammering a beginner who took a small buttons buck as a first deer.

True, it might have kept a deer from developing into a trophy rack, but a first deer is absolutely a trophy. Congratulate the kid for doing what's necessary to be a successful hunter and then raise the bar for the next season--e.g. it has to have a visible rack--or challenge him to distinguish a buttons buck from a doe.

2. Hammering a young hunter who botched a search for a wounded deer. Don't criticize, but instead gently correct and teach so they learn to do it right the next time.

I can remember that they never told us how to do this in hunter safety--only that you should wait for a deer to lie down and then search. It never said anything about grid searches or how long to search. They may need our help and encouragement to realize how to do it.
then I KNOW they are a newbie, I don't say anything about it, I just hope and pray they read enough to know what they should be doing. An experienced hunter wouldn't even post those no-no's. They should be too embarrassed to even speak of it.

Last edited by tight360; 05-21-2010 at 02:20 AM.
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Old 05-27-2010, 07:06 AM
  #72  
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I agree with the OP. I'm 26, and just getting into hunting. My Dad and I used used to go out, but really all we ever did was go for a hike and maybe take a potshot at a squirrel or little bird with the .22 or pelet rifle. I got a squirrel, once. In 26 years. So most everything I've learned has been through trial and error, and that's not much. In a few months I'll be moving to a nice new area in the middle of the woods with nothing else to do, so I'll be teaching myself. It's not like I have anyone to teach me or mentor me, so I'll be making a ton of mistakes, and the kind of harsh critisism I get from some of my peers can be really aggrivating and discouraging. It's true that most people making these mistakes are just inexperienced with no way to know better. And as far as size goes, if I take ANY size deer, I'll be happy. Hell, I'd be happy if I got a rabbit!
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Old 05-27-2010, 02:26 PM
  #73  
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Hey Corpsman. Good luck to you and hang in there. I hope you have some great experiences.

Spudrow from Mo
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Old 05-27-2010, 05:53 PM
  #74  
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Originally Posted by gun870guy View Post
I wish more people actually went out and failed on their own, than sat here with all these "professionals" :/ and chatted about how to hunt on the internet.
now this is a good reply...gun870guy i like your thinking,it seems we have let our kids down by buying them that xbox or playstation,the Y generation are not like we were back in the day,and yes your right they need to get out there and make thier own mistakes..well said
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Old 05-28-2010, 02:44 PM
  #75  
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Originally Posted by Corpsman45 View Post
I agree with the OP. I'm 26, and just getting into hunting. My Dad and I used used to go out, but really all we ever did was go for a hike and maybe take a potshot at a squirrel or little bird with the .22 or pelet rifle. I got a squirrel, once. In 26 years. So most everything I've learned has been through trial and error, and that's not much. In a few months I'll be moving to a nice new area in the middle of the woods with nothing else to do, so I'll be teaching myself. It's not like I have anyone to teach me or mentor me, so I'll be making a ton of mistakes, and the kind of harsh critisism I get from some of my peers can be really aggrivating and discouraging. It's true that most people making these mistakes are just inexperienced with no way to know better. And as far as size goes, if I take ANY size deer, I'll be happy. Hell, I'd be happy if I got a rabbit!
Good luck, Corpsman! The basics are these: Be safe, Stay downwind, stay quiet, stay still. This is a great place to learn about it. It helps to read everything you can get your hands on as well.

Some big mistakes when it comes to wounded deer:

1. Not taking a good shot. Make sure you're putting it right behind the shoulder. Be sure to study up on shot placement. There's good article on this site and it's good to imagine this if you happen to see some deer in the offseason. Imagine where you'd put the the shot.

2. Not waiting long enough after a shot. Deer will often run even when shot through the heart and lungs. Give them at least a half hour before following them. Believe me, when you shoot your first one, you'll be utterly juiced on adrenaline and you'll want to get to the deer immediately. Resist every temptation to follow for at least thirty minutes. Give them time to lie down to die. And be sure to put your gun back on "safe."

Again, read up on this. If you happen too shoot one in the paunch, you're talking a wait of hours. Four at minimum. Overnight is even better.

The one exception is if for some reason you have to follow to avoid losing the deer e.g. a snow storm is on the way that will cover the blood and tracks. Be ready to shoot if the deer gets up.

3. Don't be too quick to assume you missed. Deer may not bleed much. My first was a doe shot through both lungs and she ran 30 yards and lay down in a ditch and never left a drop of blood, clipped hair, a piece of flesh, or anything. She just flinched, stuck her tail out at the shot, and took one hop into the brush. After my 30 min. wait and not finding any blood or anything, I was wondering if I'd missed. I replayed the shot in my head and concluded she'd reacted to something. I also felt my aim was true as I was shooting off a rest. I just decided to follow in the direction she'd ran and found her a bit later.

Youtube is helpful here as you can see how deer react to shots. Also, have a flashlight in case it's dark. Better yet, a little headlamp as it keeps your hands free when gutting the deer in the dark.

4. Not searching thoroughly. If you realize you've got a wounded deer and you lose the trail, start searching the area in grids. Get some help if you can't find anything. Other hunters can be remarkably good about joining in a search.

5. Not shooting from a rest. Anything you can do to avoid an offhand shot is good and lessens the chance of wounding one.

6. Develop a mental routine ahead of time of what you need to do to make the shot. Here's mine: Is the shot safe? Can I bring the gun up without spooking the deer? Do I have a good shot or do I need to wait till the deer turns? Where am I going to aim on the deer? Again, is it safe?--if yes, flip off the safety and give the trigger gentle squeeze.

Why do this? Because even after several deer, I still basically want to go bananas when a deer's nearby. This keeps things under control and keeps me from just spraying bullets in the general direction of the deer.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:52 AM
  #76  
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We have only ourselves to blame. If we don not teach them the ethics of hunting they will not know better.
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Old 06-15-2010, 08:24 AM
  #77  
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Corpsman... completely self taught here as well. It takes a little longer but it is extremely satisfying when you get to the point you want to be. Be patient and learn to laugh at yourself occasionally.
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Old 06-16-2010, 11:09 AM
  #78  
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i really like what u is talking about
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Old 06-16-2010, 11:10 AM
  #79  
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:l mao:
Originally Posted by jaywalker View Post
Great post!
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Old 06-16-2010, 11:24 AM
  #80  
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I agree each hunter has only himself to bare judgment from (in a perfect hunting world) but yes as experienced hunters (over 40 yrs.) we do tend to judge rather harshly at times. Being a member of several sites I see it all the time,even made that mistake myself a couple times. After the comments are made (if harsh enough) it could easily cost us another hunter in the woods, so if possible we should all try to speak to the newbies with a little more temperance, for we were all there once. Good luck to all and heres wishing you all fill your tags early... So you can get to he-- out the woods and leave the real hunting to me!!!!!!!!! lol lmao
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