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draw weight

Old 11-05-2004, 06:12 PM
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Default draw weight

Will increasing my draw weight totally change my sights distance? Example if your bottom pin is 10 yards will it change?

Also when does the arrow cross your sites the 2nd time after being released from your bow? about how far out?
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Old 11-05-2004, 06:22 PM
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Default RE: draw weight

Yes, adding weight will change your pins. Less than 5 pounds will not be very noticeable till you get to long yardage. If I'm reading right, you are equating an arrow with a bullet. When you shoot an arrow, gravity will cause it to drop and never rise till it hits the ground or what your aiming at hopefully. Hope this helps. Don
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Old 11-05-2004, 06:29 PM
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Default RE: draw weight

I believe he is talking about sight paralax and it happens with a bow just like a gun.When you aim a gun or bow at a target,it is pointed upward(bullets don't rise).If your bow is sighted at 20 yards,you will most likely be at the highest point at 10-11 yards but every setup will vary.


To the first question,you will most likely not see a change in your sights untill you get past 30 yards with a 10 pound increase in draw weight.Maybe a little sooner if you are a really good shot.
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Old 11-05-2004, 06:34 PM
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Default RE: draw weight

I will add one thing,if you don't increase the poundage EXACTLY the same with the limbs and keep the tiller adjustment exactly the way it was,you will see a difference in the impact point with the poundage increase very quickly.
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Old 11-06-2004, 08:19 AM
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Default RE: draw weight

It's also going to depend on the weight of you arrows. The lighter the arrows the more you may notice it. Also keep in mind by changing your poundage as much 10 pounds it will throw the spine of your arrows off. You may need new arrows. That could affect the impact point as well.

And like Tfox said, you could change your nocking point as well, also the added weight may cause you to torque your bow differently.

Keep in mind, whenever you change anything in your set up it may require you to re tune your bow to get everything right again. And adding 10 pounds of draw weight is a pretty major change.

Some times you make a major change and don't really notice anything, other times you make a minor change and it throws everything out of whack. Welcome to archery!

And keep in mind your bow can be out of tune and still shoot pretty well when you practice. Its not hard to get field tipped arrows with addequate fletching to group well at 20 and 30 yards. Even if your spine is off or your rest and nocking point have changed. Either paper test, bare shaft test, or shoot some fixed blades to verify your bow is shooting the best it could be.

If you had the correct spine for your arrows before, I promise they won't be after adding 10 lbs of draw weight.

Paul
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Old 11-06-2004, 08:34 AM
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Default RE: draw weight

I forgot to add that I don't think it will change point of impact that much if any. Another thing that will effect that is how far away the sight is from your riser, and whether you use a peep sight and how you use it. I do a lot of playing with my bow and I rarely have to change my 20 and 30 yard setting. Even switching from heavy to light arrows. Once you get beyond 30 or 40 yards you may have to close the gap a bit on them.

I will explain the above statement. The farther away your sight is from the riser the larger your pin gap will become, but your adjustment will become more precise since you have to move your pins farther to get them where you need them. And normally if you use a peep sight your pin gaps will be closer. It really depends on how you use it though. If you center each pin in the peep at there respective yardarges you will have closer pin gaps. Essentially you are slightly changing your anchor point at each yardarge. You don't really notice until you get beyond 40 yards though. If you don't use a peep sight or use a no peep or something ismular your pin gap will be larger because you are not changing your anchor in slight amounts each time you move back. Same goes for if you center your sight housing in your peep instead of each pin. This works well if you have a large peep and not very many pins. However if you have a smaller peep and want to shoot beyond 40 yards this may not work to well, you won't get the sight picture you need.

And Tfox is also correct about the trajectory thing with rifles. The laws of gravity state that all objects fall at a steady rate. Bullets rising after you shoot them is an optical allusion of sorts because of the sight height. Change the height of your sight and trajectory will change.

Paul
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Old 11-06-2004, 09:01 AM
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Default RE: draw weight

Paul is correct,can't believe I I didn't mention it.[]With a major increase in poundage,the arrows you are shooting now will be way underspined,unless they are WAY over spined now.
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Old 11-06-2004, 09:40 AM
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Default RE: draw weight

Also when does the arrow cross your sites the 2nd time after being released from your bow? about how far out?
I'm not sure either what you are talking about here. But.. here is something I was told that has come in handy when shooting in thick woods...

If the pin at a given distance which is shorter than the one you are aiming at is over an obstruction at the given pin distance, don't shoot. To put it into an example. You are shooting at a deer 20 yards away. At 10 yards, there is a branch that you are going to shoot under. Your 20 yard pin may be under the branch, but if your 10 yard pin is over the branch which is 10 yards away, DON'T SHOOT. You will hit the branch.

I know this is a little fuzzy, but it is good to keep in mind when you hunt the "Thick Stuff".

Not sure if this helps or not[]
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