Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Archery Forums > Technical
Draw weight????? >

Draw weight?????

Technical Find or ask for all the information on setting up, tuning, and shooting your bow. If it's the technical side of archery, you'll find it here.

Draw weight?????

Old 01-13-2011, 10:17 AM
  #1  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 25
Default Draw weight?????

I am looking at a new bow it is time to retire the Whitetail 2. I have a 60 pound pull on the older bow. My question is the one I like only goes up to 50 pound draw. Is this going to be slower? also is 50 pound draw still enough power for large game take down? I am looking at a PSE Stinger and the left handed one only goes to 50 pound draw. dont know why but just want to be sure it will be ok before i drop the cash.
all in is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 10:48 AM
  #2  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: NY: NYC to Watertown
Posts: 897
Default

50# is finr for most large game,
For deer no problem, if your going for moose/elk will want some more.
Not that 50# can't take a elk, just don't want to be borderline,
Also, depending how old your bow is, modern bows with high let offs are a lot easier to draw/hold than your older bow, a modern 60-70# bow may feel like a 50-60 bow of 10 yrs ago
Terasec is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 11:59 AM
  #3  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 25
Default

Thanks thants what I was looking for. The Bear Whitetail 2 is old and I figure there will be a night and day difference just want to be sure before I drop the cash that 50 was enough. Plus the speed is 305 fps compared to the old bows 160.
all in is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 12:19 PM
  #4  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: NY: NYC to Watertown
Posts: 897
Default

Originally Posted by all in View Post
Thanks thants what I was looking for. The Bear Whitetail 2 is old and I figure there will be a night and day difference just want to be sure before I drop the cash that 50 was enough. Plus the speed is 305 fps compared to the old bows 160.
Age. Of bow side,
There is a big difference in 50-60#
I shoot a 60# browning, my brother shoots a 50# bear bow.
At the range when I shot his bow I felt like I could hold the pin on the mark all day, compared to mine.
My next bow I will probably drop down to a 50-60# bow and set it at 55#
Terasec is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 01:01 PM
  #5  
Fork Horn
 
hnt4food's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Beaverton Michigan
Posts: 114
Default

50# is plenty,especially if you have super sharp broadheads. And the easier it is to draw and maintain your draw the more confident you will become in your shot placement, which is really what bow hunting is all about. I shoot a 42 pound Bear recurve and have no problem killing deer. It will be my weapon of choice if I ever get lucky enough to draw a Michigan elk permit. No doubt in my mind that it will do the job. Heck at 10 or 12 yards, which is the range I shoot most of my deer at, a 35 pound bow with razor sharp broadheads would work.
Just hide behind a big old tree, become one with the woods and whack em when they walk by.
hnt4food is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 02:55 PM
  #6  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 25
Default

Holding the 60# was not a big deal I am 34 years old and bigger guy. Just the 50# new bow is on clearence from last year and is $100 off. I figured hell easy pull and $100 off if it will work i am all over it! the 60# is full price. I am cheap lol
all in is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 04:21 PM
  #7  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Arkansas Ozarks
Posts: 325
Default

I shoot a 50 lb. bow with Easton XX75 2215's and 100 gr. 3-blade Muzzys. Pretty slow by today's standards, but it makes for a quiet and forgiving setup, plus I have no problems pulling it back and holding it even when I'm half frozen. Pass throughs if you punch the ribs at 20 yards. I wouldn't want to take my rig out West, but for eastern hardwoods whitetails, it will get the job done.

What you lose is the ability to punch through a shoulder if you are a little off, so practice and choose your shots wisely, as hopefully we all do.
newton29 is offline  
Old 01-13-2011, 05:59 PM
  #8  
Spike
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 10
Thumbs up

I personally shoot a PSE Mohave, its about 10 years old, it was a hand-me-down from my dad because we both shoot the same draw length and I shoot it maxed out at 65 lbs (eventhough it says max weight is 70, it is really only 64-66 lbs), a weight my dad never shot it at, he usually kept it around 55 lbs. What I like about the increasd poundage is there is literally no difference in height/drop from 10 yards all the way up to 45 yards. Once I found this out my dad took his new Mathews bow (only 1 year old) up to 65 lbs and he started noticeing it shooting the same way. We both have our bows set up with one single sight pin to shoot with and we hit targets consistantly at 10-15-20-25-30-35-40-45 yards with absolutely zero compensation for height/drop. It takes the yardage guess work out. So I would recommend personally the higher poundage.
Jaderman is offline  
Old 01-14-2011, 05:58 AM
  #9  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 110
Default

After shooting an older 60# for so long be careful pulling a new 50#. It will be a tremendous difference. When I started shooting I was using a 50# cherokee 2, now I have a 70# PSE Nova, and now my cherokee has become my bowfishing bow, I don't even notice the weight on it compared to the newer one.
jicand is offline  
Old 01-14-2011, 10:02 AM
  #10  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Florida
Posts: 25
Default

From what i am reading the 60# down to 50# is a big jump. I dont know now if it is work saving the $100. Most of my kills are within 30 yards. I am just worried the 50# may not be enough and be a waist of money.
all in is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.