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the minimalist approach

Old 06-08-2021, 12:28 PM
  #11  
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Originally Posted by mrbb View Post
again your questions are NOT direct questions there is a whole bunch of things thrown into one huge open never ending THOUGHT
as you need details to get accurate answers

as , an example
you asked this>
Does anybody here hunt game with a minimalist approach? How light can you travel to the game field while still being safe, legal, proper, productive and comfortable?

all it does is make us experienced hunters have questions, NOT answers for you, as without knowing MORE, we can not really give you any detailed answers

as, think of it like this to your statement!

what TYPE OF DEER HUNTING ARE YOU ASKING ABOUT
treestand hunting, ground blind hunting, back pack hunting, spot and stalk hunting , ALL some of the types of DEER hunting
and what all one has to carry to do each is different!
SO there see NO ONE shoe fits all answer to your proposed thought as it really isn't;'a clear question at all

NEXT< then what you do after your SO called question is add a whole bunch of other information that is FAR from a question at all
that has NOTHING to do with explaining your question
it just runs off about a type of hunting you read about, that has nothing to do with your so called question about hunting with minimal equipment(I



again, if your as educated as you want us to believe , maybe try asking and simple clear SINGLE questions with details of what TYPE of hunting you plan, and not just a general wide open un answerable rambling! stick to ONE topic, ONE question in each posting! in CORRECT forum section
and odds are you will get better feedback and answers

I thought I addressed the details here:

Does this look like a good checklist for an OK deer hunter during gun season, say November, assuming the hunt starts early in the morning at legal shooting hour? This also assumes a traditional walking hunt where one might just sit on a log and wait for deer to come down a trail in an area that's already been scouted by you. This also assumes you can get your unskinned/unquartered quarry to a game processor in a reasonable amount of time. Some processors are open for business 7 days a week during deer season but I would want to make sure I hunt on a Sunday if the local processor isn't open again until Monday morning. What might you add or deduct from my checklist if YOU were to hunt deer in a state like Oklahoma or Texas?

This is a Hunting Gear Discussion Forum and I'm not asking about fishing lures here. I understand how one hunts, where one hunts, what one hunts and why one hunts will affect the selection of gear for the field.

I think I will ask no more how-to-hunt, "how-do-you-hunt" or "what-do-you-think" questions at this site from now on. I probably just missed the whole scope of this site from the beginning. I know, I will just study up the OP's by other members here by reading a number of them and get a feel for their style before I make any new threads here. If I do things in the style of others here, I might not look so out of place.

As they say, when in Rome...

Last edited by AlongCameJones; 06-08-2021 at 12:30 PM.
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Old 06-08-2021, 01:01 PM
  #12  
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There are some good videos online that show good ways to field dress game, The gutless method might be worth learning, and you had better plan on learning to field dress game while it is on the ground.

Last edited by Big Uncle; 06-09-2021 at 11:33 AM.
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Old 06-08-2021, 01:26 PM
  #13  
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I will also add this
MOST folks, if they were looking for AN equipment LIST of what is needed to HUNT deer , will ask JUST that
and there are most likely thousands of like post that can be found online if one looks

that would be the NORMAL way to ask about what equipment is needed
a SHORT list, or LONG list, I am certian there are thousands pre typed by members on MANY forums including some on this one if, you look!

BUT the TYPE of hunting you do , will determine what gear you need MOST, from there its personal what gear you can skip or take!
this is where it get personal and is un answerable!
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Old 06-08-2021, 01:30 PM
  #14  
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Perhaps it is because a person who comes on like he is above us and then asks for our opinion is not going to be taken too seriously. He says because he reads books he is prepared to hunt big game and pretends he knows how to hunt small game because he reads books. I suspect all of us read many books about hunting but we didn't have the attitude that we knew it all because we were catered to by an outfitter who did all the work except the easy part, pulling the trigger. My advice is that when a person thinks they are above the great unwashed, they don't ask them for help. All in all, trying to address this poster's questions which really are not questions has been more confusing than anything else. My advice to the op is to find a mentor and stop trying to do it yourself because he over thinks everything. Hunting takes skill and experience to be successful, but it isn't rocket science.
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Old 06-08-2021, 01:32 PM
  #15  
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My typical pack for a single day of hunting close to home (like you'd be doing in Oklahoma) is weather appropriate clothing and boots. An orange vest. My vest has pockets and a game pouch in the back. I use this in place of a backpack.

It is obvious to say that you need your license, your firearm/bullets or bow/arrows/broad heads etc. This doesn't need to be pointed out. Especially to an educated man as yourself.

Aside from clothing and weapon of choice. I carry a sharp pocket knife a drag rope, a small pair of binoculars, a water bottle (usually two), and some snackies.

Don't overcomplicate it.

-Jake
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Old 06-08-2021, 01:42 PM
  #16  
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Agreed (with Mrbb's now self-deleted post that was above this one). Many of us have served in the military and some made a career of it. Hint, your military background does not make you sound weird. Nor does your education. From what I can see, your stream of consciousness style of posting is off putting. You ask some questions, then quote some texts on the same subject and then offer advice on the same subject. And when people attempt to answer your questions, you tend to argue with them and sometimes offer subtle insults.

A lot of members here have advanced degrees in engineering, law and many other disciplines. Others on here may not have a degree from a college but have one in life experience. A college degree exposes one to lots of disciplines and teaches you how to learn. It's a start. The rest of your learning occurs after college and continues throughout life, your career and life experiences. Just like going to Jump school in the army. At some point, you begin jumping out of planes and the real learning begins. Not just the few jumps you make in school but the next several hundred. It's much the same in hunting. Each time you go out hunting gives you an opportunity to learn more. You can read books, magazine articles, watch videos, etc. but the real learning comes when you try to make that information work for you in the field. It's a fun challenge that never gets old.

Your comment about being an educated man and not a yokel implies that people on this website that think you sound odd are yokels is insulting and extremely inaccurate. The definition of a yokel includes people that are rustic, simple, naive, easily deceived and that fail to see through false pretenses. By their posts, it is obvious that members here are not yokels. It ought to be equally obvious that many of them are well educated, highly intelligent, have lots of life experience and are quite advanced on that learning curve called life.There's at least one game warden in the membership, several hunting guides and many ranch owners who observe game on a regular basis. Some members have hunted game on several continents, others have hunted in almost half of the states in our country and quite a few have completed one hunting slam or another. Some of them have hunted since they were young children and a lot have 40, 50 or even more years of hunting experience.

I guess my question to you is why you would want to offend this much experience in hunting when you could just as easily learn from it and advance exponentially in your stated quest of being a hunter? That doesn't make sense. You're off to a rough start but it's salvageable. That puts the ball back in your court. Best of luck.

Last edited by CalHunter; 06-08-2021 at 07:10 PM. Reason: mrbb self-deleted a post that removed some of my context.
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Old 06-08-2021, 05:01 PM
  #17  
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CalHunter, I had better cool off for a while. Take a break a while from new threads. I just ordered that deer hunting book online. I would like to thank Bocajnala for sharing his gear with us. I wonder how one uses a DRAG ROPE but still protects the meat from contamination. When I shot my buck on my guided hunt, I only had to drag the deer to the guide's Dodge 4x4 about 100 feet in the woods. He wasn't gutted yet, that was done back at the ranch house.

I looked "drag rope"up on Google and found this video: the guy has his doe gutted already and is dragging her along the ground with the body cavity open to possibly get contaminated with dirt, leaves and debris as he is dragging.

Field dressing on the ground. My concerns are my bad back (severe pain from stooping/squatting, I do much better standing up or sitting) and soiling the meat with dirt, grass and leaves. Big Uncle says I should learn to gut a deer on the ground. Could it be that there might not be a tree handy with a low branch in certain deer fields to hang a gambrel in Oklahoma? There are those deer gambrels that have long tripod legs and ones that attach to the hitch receiver or bumper of a truck. Of course, that's adding to the cost and complexity of gear. Lots of compromises. Those of us with some physical limitations or a degree of handicap may just need more gear than we really like. One thing I don't have to worry about in Ok is large predators like brown bear. From what I gather, a cougar or a black bear in this plains state is about rare to none at all.

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Old 06-08-2021, 05:22 PM
  #18  
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there is absolutely NOTHING wrong with gutting a deer laying on the ground , any dirt or leaves that get inside the cavity will do NO harm under 99.9% of time and conditions, till deer makes it to a butcher to be washed and skinned and processed!

a drag rose can be of many shapes and sizes
all it is , is a rope tied to the deer and used to DRAG the deer out
Millions of deer hunters have done this (gutted in field on the ground and dragged the deer out with a simple rope) without any issue's and in many states its the most comm on way they get there deer gutted and out of the woods
simply as most hunters DON"T have private lands and game carts or guides to do it for them in other ways!
Main reasons most folks gut a deer on the ground where shot, is the FASTER you get the intestines out of a animal after its dead the better, also, it helps in cooling the meat faster as well
and sine most folks hunt public lands and don't park next to where they hunt
they also gut in the field to make the animal LIGHTER to make dragging out easier!
the amount of weight you loose gutting an animal in the field is worth the hassle to most all hunters that DON"T quarter there game, or where LEGALLY maybe they have to haul out intact!

other wise, Gut them where there shot, and don't worry about it, its normal doings in most places by most deer hunters!
if you DON"T want to use a game cart due to added costs
many folks will also use something else that is slippery to help easy the resistance of dragging the deer alone out of the wood
like a sled, or a piece of plastic that is strong enough!
lay deer on that and then drag all in one!
I have dragged deer as far as 2 miles(young and dumb at that time, HA ha!! )
no harm to the meat!

the hotter/warmer the temps are, the faster you should be removing the guts from a deer as well!
there full of bacteria, more so than leaves and twigs are!

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Old 06-08-2021, 05:42 PM
  #19  
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Whatever gets in there while dragging it isn't going to hurt anything.

Don't drag it through a sewage ditch and you'll be fine.

Don't worry about skinning it right now. Shoot it, gut it, drag it, and take it to the processor. He can do the rest for you. You can have all that done by 10am and still catch a late breakfast.

-Jake

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Old 06-08-2021, 07:35 PM
  #20  
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My comments below in blue to maintain context.

Originally Posted by AlongCameJones View Post
CalHunter, I had better cool off for a while. Take a break a while from new threads. I just ordered that deer hunting book online. I would like to thank Bocajnala for sharing his gear with us. I wonder how one uses a DRAG ROPE but still protects the meat from contamination. When I shot my buck on my guided hunt, I only had to drag the deer to the guide's Dodge 4x4 about 100 feet in the woods. He wasn't gutted yet, that was done back at the ranch house.
You're in the process of learning a lesson that many of us (and I include myself in that category) have had to learn about proofreading something before we hit the send button. Things will sound great in my head but don't always look good in the topic. Your guided hunt gave you a good idea about a gear list for that specific hunt. If you went back at the same time of the year but the rancher and his sons weren't available, your gear list would likely change. And if you hunted the exact same property towards the end of the season, your list might change again. The point is you know how you're going to hunt, where you're going to hunt, what vehicle access you're going to, hunting partners or not, etc. All anybody can give you is a general gear list that they use for their type of hunting. It's up to you to decide whether to keep that list or modify it.

I looked "drag rope"up on Google and found this video: the guy has his doe gutted already and is dragging her along the ground with the body cavity open to possibly get contaminated with dirt, leaves and debris as he is dragging.
I've done my share of rinsing out a carcass but try not to drag it through dirt or leaves. Where I hunt, I can often bring my truck up near my downed buck so there is minimal dragging. If you get a chance, watch a few Youtube videos on the gutless method of field dressing a buck or any large game animal. I first heard of it from Flags and am transitioning over to it.


Field dressing on the ground. My concerns are my bad back (severe pain from stooping/squatting, I do much better standing up or sitting) and soiling the meat with dirt, grass and leaves. Big Uncle says I should learn to gut a deer on the ground. Could it be that there might not be a tree handy with a low branch in certain deer fields to hang a gambrel in Oklahoma? There are those deer gambrels that have long tripod legs and ones that attach to the hitch receiver or bumper of a truck. Of course, that's adding to the cost and complexity of gear. Lots of compromises. Those of us with some physical limitations or a degree of handicap may just need more gear than we really like. One thing I don't have to worry about in Ok is large predators like brown bear. From what I gather, a cougar or a black bear in this plains state is about rare to none at all.
Big uncle is correct IMHO on gutting a buck on the ground. It's much easier than hanging it up on a deer gambrel in the field or on some hoist attached to your truck. You still have the issue of getting your buck into your truck but there are several methods for doing that. Currently, I have a half sheet of 3/4 plywood in the back of my truck that helps me a lot. That works for me and my specific type of hunting and vehicle access and may not work at all for the next guy. The trick is to think your way all the way through your hunt at the location you're hunting. How close can you get your truck to your downed buck? Do you have a truck? Or can you borrow one? If you can get a truck near your downed buck, then you can leave most of that gear in your truck. And go hunt with your rifle, ammo, license, tags, binos, hunter orange if required and some method for carrying water (I prefer hydration bladders but most hunter do just fine with a water bottle).

Jake (Bocajnala) has given you excellent advice to get out there and hunt. Each time you hunt, you will find your gear list changes a bit. And that's okay. It means you're learning and figuring out what you really need and what can be left behind in your truck or not purchased in the first place. It's a process but a fun one.
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