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300 RUM Accuracy

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Old 11-09-2018, 09:57 AM
  #11  
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well if accuracy is top of list, again, get a McMillan, go to any 1,000 yard match shoot and see what brand stock is on MOST guns??
there is a reason they cost what they do and are on so many HIGH end guns, and its NOT about looks
heck when they blend colors even they cannot tell you what it will look like 100%
yet stops very few from wanting them
I have a good dozen of there stocks, and a few dozen of other brands and I will again say there TOP of the top IMO on aftermarket stocks when accuracy is main goal
plus there pretty indestructible to boot?

I have them on ..50 BMG bolt actions rifles and they hold hold up like NO other stock IMO!
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Old 11-09-2018, 10:32 AM
  #12  
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McMillan does indeed make an excellent stock. However, due to cost I think it is a bit out of place in a hunting rifle with a factory stock barreled action. I seriously doubt that t would make the OP's rifle shoot even a tiny bit better than any number of very good quality stocks that cost considerably less. McMillan is certainly a top recommendation for a custom or semi-custom rifle that has had skilled action work and a high quality barrel.
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Old 11-09-2018, 01:02 PM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by Big Uncle View Post
McMillan does indeed make an excellent stock. However, due to cost I think it is a bit out of place in a hunting rifle with a factory stock barreled action. I seriously doubt that t would make the OP's rifle shoot even a tiny bit better than any number of very good quality stocks that cost considerably less. McMillan is certainly a top recommendation for a custom or semi-custom rifle that has had skilled action work and a high quality barrel.
well If the OP is planning to do other accuracy improvements True a bolt face, trigger , lap a barrel, re croun a barrel
a Mcmillian stock will only add to the whole project, even on a stock barrel
I have a few guns I did this exact above work to and added a McMillan stock to them and they shoot 1/2 inch groups on factory barrels(2 model 700's and a two model 7's from rem)
and there all hunting rifles and don't regret spending a penny on them, I don't plan to sell them, they are rifles I wanted set up to FIT me and wanted quality parts across the board

I am NOT SAYING< a lesser stock cannot help here, BUT if the OP says he wants the best?
well?? pretty hard to beat a McMillan stock
and BY the way, I also have factory 100% stock rem 700 rifles that shoot 1/2 MOA, in both wood and syn rem stocks!
many times rifles are like pick of the litter, some out of box just shoot above average and well some less than stellar groups LOL
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Old 11-13-2018, 04:38 AM
  #14  
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A lot of good info here. I still have a lot to learn before I pull the trigger. Leaning toward McMillian, with only a few more bucks and if I am going through the trouble of putting a new stock and trigger on the gun then its worth it. After it's done, I'll let you all know how it shoots. Thanks for the info. BTW what is OP?
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Old 11-13-2018, 05:48 AM
  #15  
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OP = "original poster" or "original post"

In this case, it's you.

-Jake
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Old 11-13-2018, 09:32 AM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Sweetroels View Post
A lot of good info here. I still have a lot to learn before I pull the trigger. Leaning toward McMillian, with only a few more bucks and if I am going through the trouble of putting a new stock and trigger on the gun then its worth it. After it's done, I'll let you all know how it shoots. Thanks for the info. BTW what is OP?
if you get a McMillan there guaranteed for life, and I Think you will be very happy
BUT before ordering one, make sure you learn how to measure a stock to fit YOU< as if your spending the money, , spend it so you have a rifle stock that fits you like a glove, and then you can get the most out of it for your investment!
some times again they have stocks ready to ship, that they discount, not a bad deal, and all the more so if there set up to your desired size, but IMO< if BUYING< buy once cry once and DON"T buy just because of its a deal and ALMOST the spec's you want!
once you have a fitted stock you will have a gun you will want to keep forever, so its an investment and not just a purchase IMO
but like all fitted things, the value is mostly ONLY for YOU, if you plan to resell
so keep in mind
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Old 11-13-2018, 09:11 PM
  #17  
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The McMillan stocks look inexpensive until you realize that price on the top of the page is NOT a drop in stock price. Even their lower end stocks run just under $1,000 when you add the full inlet for the barreled action and bottom metal, and pillar blocking. Plus the cost to have a smith bed it, or materials to do so yourself. With a drop in price of about $300, the Magpul stock is FAR less expensive than the McMillans - and converts the rifle to AICS compatible DBM.

What I might ask - which 700 model do you have? What do you intend to spend? What have you done to your other 700’s to modify your stocks and triggers to improve accuracy? Why can’t you simply replicate those modifications on this rifle? What load development have you done for this rifle? Or what factory ammo are you shooting? What size group is it shooting now? What size group can you shoot with your other rifles? Before and after your stock and trigger modifications? How many rounds down the barrel of that RUM?

The McMillan stocks are fantastic, the A3-A is one of my favorite stocks of all time - probably my top favorite really, and I REALLY enjoy the Game Warden as a hunting stock. Manners and Foundation also produce fantastic stocks. HS precision, even Bell & Carlson produce drop in ready stocks at a fraction of the cost of these 3. KRG makes a chassis which looks like a stock for about $500 drop in ready (the Bravo). XLR, MDT, MPA, and a handful of others also make great chassis’ for the 700. Boyd’s, Richards’ microfit, and Stocky’s offer various low cost stocks which can rival the Magpul for low cost, and be even more rigid - assuming you’re still comfortable doing a small amount of finish inlet fitting and block & bedding work.

The Magpul stock is fine, not on the level of the McMillan, Foundation, Manners, or MPA, but it is a very good stock. An incredible stock for the money. I used one on a 700 training rifle for part of this year, and a few friends on my precision rifle club use them. They are very stiff, and suit well for field shooting. Sexy, they are not, but for the money, they require less work than most others in their price class to deliver improvement.

I will also call out - a Saturday afternoon and about $50-75 in supplies is all I need to make a factory Remington 700 stock within about 90-95% of the precision potential of any stock that has been mentioned on this thread. Free floating the barrel, pillar blocking, and bedding the action (and stiffening the forend of the polymer factory stocks) will bring them to nearly the same performance potential as any stock on the market. In the context of hunting beanfields, I can’t tell the difference between my $100 Boyd’s stocks or my $1600 Manners or $1000 McMillan, or my $900 MPA. The groups are all small, and the fit is what I made it to be. All of the extra money has been spent for versatility and adaptability for different applications, and those features are largely lost on a rifle used for beanfield hunting - spending more doesn’t really get you any more.

Also, comparatively, if a guy buys a new stock or free floats, blocks, and beds a factory Remington and replaces the trigger, I expect a 1.25-1.5” rifle to shrink to about 3/4” - and it’ll cost about $200 to make that happen. Alternatively, you could spend a he11 of a lot of money blueprinting the action and setting back your barrel, $500-1000, and not improve your group size at all. If the crown isn’t bad, recutting it won’t fix it. If the throat is burned out in that over-bored 300RUM, lapping the bore or truing the bolt face won’t do anything to help precision - but WILL cost a couple hundred bucks.

Lapping a used factory barrel has never proven to be worth doing, for me. A broken in barrel won’t benefit nearly as much as a new barrel, and all you’re doing is opening yourself up for a shift. Leave the copper where it is, only push out carbon, and let that 300rum live the rest of its short barrel life.

I think you need to really consider what you want to do with the rifle, and what your expectations should be for precision in that application. A beanfield rifle, and 0-500yrd recreational shooter doesn’t need to waste money on a $800-1200 stock and $1000 in gunsmithing. Throw on a $250-350 stock from Magpul, Stocky’s, Boyd’s, HS precision, Bell & Carlson, etc. Free float it, pillar block it, and bed if applicable, then drop in a TriggerTech Primary trigger for $150, and live happily the rest of your life with that rifle - or at least the rest of its barrel life. You’re getting advice here for how to build a custom precision rifle for a few thousand dollars, when it sounds like all you need is a modest upgrade to a casual field rifle.
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Old 11-14-2018, 08:15 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Nomercy448 View Post
The McMillan stocks look inexpensive until you realize that price on the top of the page is NOT a drop in stock price. Even their lower end stocks run just under $1,000 when you add the full inlet for the barreled action and bottom metal, and pillar blocking. Plus the cost to have a smith bed it, or materials to do so yourself. With a drop in price of about $300, the Magpul stock is FAR less expensive than the McMillans - and converts the rifle to AICS compatible DBM.

What I might ask - which 700 model do you have? What do you intend to spend? What have you done to your other 700’s to modify your stocks and triggers to improve accuracy? Why can’t you simply replicate those modifications on this rifle? What load development have you done for this rifle? Or what factory ammo are you shooting? What size group is it shooting now? What size group can you shoot with your other rifles? Before and after your stock and trigger modifications? How many rounds down the barrel of that RUM?

The McMillan stocks are fantastic, the A3-A is one of my favorite stocks of all time - probably my top favorite really, and I REALLY enjoy the Game Warden as a hunting stock. Manners and Foundation also produce fantastic stocks. HS precision, even Bell & Carlson produce drop in ready stocks at a fraction of the cost of these 3. KRG makes a chassis which looks like a stock for about $500 drop in ready (the Bravo). XLR, MDT, MPA, and a handful of others also make great chassis’ for the 700. Boyd’s, Richards’ microfit, and Stocky’s offer various low cost stocks which can rival the Magpul for low cost, and be even more rigid - assuming you’re still comfortable doing a small amount of finish inlet fitting and block & bedding work.

The Magpul stock is fine, not on the level of the McMillan, Foundation, Manners, or MPA, but it is a very good stock. An incredible stock for the money. I used one on a 700 training rifle for part of this year, and a few friends on my precision rifle club use them. They are very stiff, and suit well for field shooting. Sexy, they are not, but for the money, they require less work than most others in their price class to deliver improvement.

I will also call out - a Saturday afternoon and about $50-75 in supplies is all I need to make a factory Remington 700 stock within about 90-95% of the precision potential of any stock that has been mentioned on this thread. Free floating the barrel, pillar blocking, and bedding the action (and stiffening the forend of the polymer factory stocks) will bring them to nearly the same performance potential as any stock on the market. In the context of hunting beanfields, I can’t tell the difference between my $100 Boyd’s stocks or my $1600 Manners or $1000 McMillan, or my $900 MPA. The groups are all small, and the fit is what I made it to be. All of the extra money has been spent for versatility and adaptability for different applications, and those features are largely lost on a rifle used for beanfield hunting - spending more doesn’t really get you any more.

Also, comparatively, if a guy buys a new stock or free floats, blocks, and beds a factory Remington and replaces the trigger, I expect a 1.25-1.5” rifle to shrink to about 3/4” - and it’ll cost about $200 to make that happen. Alternatively, you could spend a he11 of a lot of money blueprinting the action and setting back your barrel, $500-1000, and not improve your group size at all. If the crown isn’t bad, recutting it won’t fix it. If the throat is burned out in that over-bored 300RUM, lapping the bore or truing the bolt face won’t do anything to help precision - but WILL cost a couple hundred bucks.

Lapping a used factory barrel has never proven to be worth doing, for me. A broken in barrel won’t benefit nearly as much as a new barrel, and all you’re doing is opening yourself up for a shift. Leave the copper where it is, only push out carbon, and let that 300rum live the rest of its short barrel life.

I think you need to really consider what you want to do with the rifle, and what your expectations should be for precision in that application. A beanfield rifle, and 0-500yrd recreational shooter doesn’t need to waste money on a $800-1200 stock and $1000 in gunsmithing. Throw on a $250-350 stock from Magpul, Stocky’s, Boyd’s, HS precision, Bell & Carlson, etc. Free float it, pillar block it, and bed if applicable, then drop in a TriggerTech Primary trigger for $150, and live happily the rest of your life with that rifle - or at least the rest of its barrel life. You’re getting advice here for how to build a custom precision rifle for a few thousand dollars, when it sounds like all you need is a modest upgrade to a casual field rifle.
I agree very much with all you have said, here
but some times however its NOT possible to get stock to fit as well, when trying to work with the STOCK rem stock IMO

and to be clear I wasn';t TRYING to get the OP to spend a LOT of money, he asked for what are good stocks, and I simply said McMillan's are hard to beat
I also stated that a STOCK rem 700 can be a very accurate rifle AS IS, even own a bunch that are tack rivers that will hang with some of my custom guns that cost a LOT of coin!
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Old 11-17-2018, 12:49 PM
  #19  
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@mrbb - No need to continually defend your statements in every thread, unless you feel they really aren't defensible.

Since we haven't seen the OP in a while, I expect the entirety of the conversation largely has become moot anyway.
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