Gunsmithing Projects & Techniques Reference material for step by step projects and gunsmithing techniques

The coffee can shotgun restoration

Reply

Old 02-27-2014, 03:28 AM
  #1  
Typical Buck
Thread Starter
 
DIY_guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 819
Default The coffee can shotgun restoration

Time to start another gun rehabillitation project. This old shotgun has been sitting disassembled in a coffee can in the corner of my shop for the last 4 or 5 years. It was given to me be Dan Infalt. It’s a throw away for a variety of reasons but I never threw it away. This long winter has me doing more projects in the warmth of my shop so the coffee can gun gets a 2nd look.

The gun spent some time in a closet with an angry raccoon. What raccoon urine can do to wood and metal is amazing. I contend that in concentrated form could be weaponized. Needless to say, this gun is in terrible shape. I don’t think the barrel can be saved due the rusting.

A bit about the gun. This is a Ithaca Model 66 super single, Buck Buster. This gun was made by Ithaca from 1967 to 1979. Oddly this gun has no serial number anywhere on it but serial numbers were not mandated until 1968. The only info is stamped into the barrel identifying the gun. This particular gun is chambered in 20 ga. It's a lever action only in that the lever opens the breech to load a shotshell rather than a lever behind the hammer. Here is some info from the past.



Compared to other guns it doesn’t have many parts.



Its not a particularly valuable gun.



Back to this coffee can gun. It takes little imagination to understand what raccoon urine can do to steel but I am impressed to how it reacts with aluminum (or pot metal) this anodized metal should not corrode but raccoon urine has created a white almost glass-like patina that etched the aluminum.







The effects on the barrel are devastating.





The pitting is so deep I don’t think there is any hope for the barrel.



There were some lose parts in the coffee can that the exploded schematic help me identify.



The parts inside the gun are likewise in bad shape.





The stock is cracked (visible below the white line) and the front grip is pretty darkened (or it may just be a dark piece of wook that looks different than the butt stock wood) . Both are dinged up and scratched but at least there is something to work with and it still has the original Ithaca plastic butt plate. I will add white and black spacers to the butt plate just because I like how it looks.





I think I can repair the cracked stock but even if I cant, I can easily find a replacement online. Since the stock is in such poor shape I have little to lose by trying my hand at stippling the grip. Its something Ive always wanted to attempt and this is the perfect piece of wood to try it on because if I screw it up, Im not out much.

The first step is to get a good look at what Im dealing with in regards to the barrel. I soaked it in naval jelly for 24 hours which is far longer than I have soaked anything to remove rust.



The rust was so bad It made the jelly bubble up while attacking the rust. Ive not seen that before. It could be the raccoon urine. I cant be sure.



After 24 hours I rinsed under running water and then took a wire brush to the barrel.



It looked pretty good at the breech end.



Sadly though from the mid point to the muzzle it is just too pitted to be safe to use. If your reading this and know of a source for a 20 ga buck buster barrel, don’t be shy.



I may end up restoring the gun but then have to wait until I locate a barrel to finish it. At any rate I have a stock to repair and refinish, gun parts in serious need of cleaning and rebluing and I get to try my hand at stippling so back to work.

Last edited by DIY_guy; 02-27-2014 at 04:22 AM.
DIY_guy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 02:02 PM
  #2  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Clermont Florida U.S.
Posts: 4,970
Default

If it turns out as good as your last project, you'll have a winner. That poor barrel looks bad. Worse case scenario, it's a wall hanger discussion piece! Good luck. BTW, have you fired the project gun yet?
bugsNbows is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 02:55 PM
  #3  
foo
Spike
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: ohio
Posts: 12
Default Coffee Can

The barrel might be a candidate, for a "stub project." to a 28 or 410.
Just a thought. Foo
foo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2014, 03:37 PM
  #4  
Typical Buck
Thread Starter
 
DIY_guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 819
Default

Originally Posted by bugsNbows View Post
If it turns out as good as your last project, you'll have a winner. That poor barrel looks bad. Worse case scenario, it's a wall hanger discussion piece! Good luck. BTW, have you fired the project gun yet?
Waiting for the national weather service to give me a day without dangerous windchill alerts. Its freaking cold out. 13 below zero tonight.
DIY_guy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2014, 04:50 AM
  #5  
Typical Buck
Thread Starter
 
DIY_guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 819
Default

I placed a chisel in the butt plate end of the stock to spread the crack open. Then, using a syringe and Tightbond glue I filled the crack and clamped it tightly for several hours. During that time I cut a few black and white plastic spacers to match the plastic butt plate size and hole spacing. Then I attached the spacers and butt plate to the stock and sanded the old finish off the stock and down to the size of the original butt plate. This shaped the black and white spacers. The gun didnt originally have black and white spacers but I like how they dress up the look of a gun so I added them.



When I was sanding at the 400 grit level I made sure there was plenty of wood dust packed in the crack and then laid down a layer of super glue to mix with the fine wood dust. The super glue mixes with the wood dust and creates a great gap filler made up the same material as the surrounding wood. Look up “super glue and baking soda” on youtube. Its an interesting method of repair and crack filling. I used walnut dust from the stock instead of baking soda.



The goal here is to fill the void so that the crack is not visible as a surface imperfection that can be seen and felt through the finish. The super glue dries almost instantly and you can go back to sanding the wood.

Satisfied that the stock repair worked I tried my hand at stippling. Stippling is the ugly 2nd cousin of checkering (which I want to get into down the road) In simple terms its just a pattern stamped, gouged, pecked, embossed into the wood to increase the grip or traction for your hand when holding the stock. It can be done with a hammer and nail or any of a variety of means to create a random or organized pattern in the wood. I planned to try it with a Dremmel tool and a very tiny ball cutter. I used the 105N engraving cutter

http://www.dremel.com/en-us/Accessor...l.aspx?pid=105



If you have ever knocked the bark off a piece of old wood and have seen the tunnels bored by insects, thats the sort of look I was going for (if the insects were working overtime and on crack)

I sketched an area on both sides of the grip that I would stay in (always stay inside the lines) The plan is to freehand as best as I can. I would freehand not only the outline but also the depth and the random pattern. I plan to only go about a 16th of an inch deep.



Keeping to the scribed line was tough but manageable. I couldn’t push too deep or the bit would really dig in and take you for a ride. I learned quickly to go slow with not much pressure. Here is how it turned out (fuzzy burrs and all prior to sanding).



Then I did some sanding with 400 grit to remove the burrs along the edges of the grooves.



Then I took a bit of 000 steel wool to it to get deeper into the grooves. Here is the outcome.



Here is a video that better shows the end result. Im pleased with the results.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P759C2ekS5k

Now the stock parts can be refinised with tung oil and I can get to cleaning up the metal parts.
DIY_guy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2014, 05:45 AM
  #6  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 749
Default

some of my ithaca 66 has factory checkering and some do not all mine have ss# most start with 66 but not all of them it is located on the left side if the receiver. still locking for a barrel for you. the guy that had the 12 gauge slug barrel put it back up as a bid now not buy it now. at $10.49 now
http://m.ebay.com/itm/231168152801?nav=SEARCH
Bbj270 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2014, 09:41 AM
  #7  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Clermont Florida U.S.
Posts: 4,970
Default

I'm loving that stipling. At first, I thought you were just going to make a bunch of "dents" so as to not have to checker. I've seen some rather poor efforts in that regard. Yours is great (but, being an Entomologist, I am rather biased...LOL).
bugsNbows is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-28-2014, 09:57 AM
  #8  
Typical Buck
Thread Starter
 
DIY_guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 819
Default

Originally Posted by bugsNbows View Post
(but, being an Entomologist, I am rather biased...LOL).
Well Im a Lutheran and I still like it. I showed it to a Presbyterian and they like it too.
DIY_guy is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-02-2014, 05:01 PM
  #9  
Giant Nontypical
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Allegan, MI
Posts: 8,019
Default

Originally Posted by DIY_guy View Post
Well Im a Lutheran and I still like it. I showed it to a Presbyterian and they like it too.
***Now that's just plain funny and I don't care who you are, LOL!
Topgun 3006 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2014, 03:26 AM
  #10  
Typical Buck
Thread Starter
 
DIY_guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 819
Default

I was out of town most of the weekend but did manage to get the metal parts of the Ithaca cleaned, stripped and reblued. The receiver is going to take some effort. The aluminum it pitted from the raccoon urine. Its going to take some elbow grease and time. That’s ok as there are still lots of coats of tung oil to be put on the stock.







DIY_guy is offline  
Reply With Quote

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service