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Where to start?

Guns Like firearms themselves, there's a wide variety of opinions on what's the best gun.

Where to start?

Old 10-12-2021, 02:53 PM
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Hey HuntingNet!

I thought I might pick your brains for a little advice. Years back I went target shooting with my father. It was the first time I had fired a firearm and it was pretty fun. I was little on edge as my dad just sort of jumped into the hobby and made some pretty careless moves. Between no trigger discipline and pointing the barrel towards me and my brother (the weapon was unloaded, but still). This is coming from a guy who typically likes video games, movies and other media based hobbies and even I could see where he was going wrong. Anyway, I'd actually like to get more involved with firearms myself, mostly for target practice/range shooting as I don't see myself hunting (for now).

My initial thoughts are to go to local range that has classes on firearm safety and start there. There is one nearby that has both so I'll be looking into that. Beyond that, if I end up really enjoying myself I'd like to purchase a pistol. So to that end, what are some pistols that are decent for newbies like me and maybe won't break the bank? Keep in mind, I am located in California, so this may all be a moot point anyway, still though, couldn't hurt to find out for when I move. Don't like the weather here.

Thanks!

-IB Myke
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Old 10-12-2021, 03:18 PM
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I have to ask, how did someone who never hunted become an administrator of a hunting website, especially when the site is names hunting .net?
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Old 10-12-2021, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Oldtimr View Post
I have to ask, how did someone who never hunted become an administrator of a hunting website, especially when the site is names hunting .net?
Specifically I work for Internet Brands as a community manager for a number of forums. We support each forum's mods and admins. This post was to step into the hobby and align myself more with it. I understand that someone so far removed from the subject matter of the forum being an admin can come off as very strange.
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Old 10-13-2021, 01:47 AM
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Many ranges have rentals that will allow you to try out allot of things before choosing what you actually want to buy.

Go and explain what you're looking for, listen to their advice and options that they give you and then see what you like.

-Jake
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Old 10-13-2021, 06:12 AM
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For something around 20 years, I have given the same advice to all new and would-be handgun shooters: your first handgun should be TWO handguns:

1) An appropriate handgun to satisfy the application in which youíre interested

and

2) A target style 22LR such as the Ruger Mark IV, S&W Victory, Browning Buckmark, Beretta Neos. (NOT combat/duty style 22ís like SR22 or M&P22).

If your purpose is simply target shooting and marksmanship skills development, then the target style 22LR may be all you want or need.

If you are unsure about any specific application which might be of interest, again, the target style 22LR may be all you want or need until you discover some other interesting application.

The purpose here is that a target style 22LR pistol will offer your fastest and most efficient path to develop fundamentals of handgun marksmanship, without significant hindrances of recoil, difficult triggers, high ammo or pistol cost, etc. These fundamentals built with the target style 22LR are easily transferred to any other handgun type, with only slight adaptation required for grip, manual of arms, and trigger management.

Being located in California, your options might be rather limited - I believe the Smith & Wesson 22A is on the Communist List, which would be a relatively reasonable choice.

Are you solely focused on handguns at this time, or do you also have interest in rifleshooting as well?
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Old 10-13-2021, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Bocajnala View Post
Many ranges have rentals that will allow you to try out allot of things before choosing what you actually want to buy.

Go and explain what you're looking for, listen to their advice and options that they give you and then see what you like.

-Jake
Much appreciated, I'll do that.

Originally Posted by Nomercy448 View Post
For something around 20 years, I have given the same advice to all new and would-be handgun shooters: your first handgun should be TWO handguns:

1) An appropriate handgun to satisfy the application in which you’re interested

and

2) A target style 22LR such as the Ruger Mark IV, S&W Victory, Browning Buckmark, Beretta Neos. (NOT combat/duty style 22’s like SR22 or M&P22).

If your purpose is simply target shooting and marksmanship skills development, then the target style 22LR may be all you want or need.

If you are unsure about any specific application which might be of interest, again, the target style 22LR may be all you want or need until you discover some other interesting application.

The purpose here is that a target style 22LR pistol will offer your fastest and most efficient path to develop fundamentals of handgun marksmanship, without significant hindrances of recoil, difficult triggers, high ammo or pistol cost, etc. These fundamentals built with the target style 22LR are easily transferred to any other handgun type, with only slight adaptation required for grip, manual of arms, and trigger management.

Being located in California, your options might be rather limited - I believe the Smith & Wesson 22A is on the Communist List, which would be a relatively reasonable choice.

Are you solely focused on handguns at this time, or do you also have interest in rifleshooting as well?
I figured just for starters to focus on handguns, but definitely have an interest in rifles. I was able to fire my father's AR-15, but between lack of skill and not being sighted in, I wasn't hitting anything. I'll definitely look into a 22LR as well. Really appreciate the response.

Edit: Looked at all the models you suggested and really like the look (and MSRP) of the Beretta. Good reviews for it as well.

Last edited by IBMyke; 10-13-2021 at 09:24 AM.
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Old 10-14-2021, 07:52 AM
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https://www.smith-wesson.com/product...617?sku=160578

https://ruger.com/products/markIVSta...ets/40105.html

Ive found both of these handguns to be helpful and useful in training my sons ,
when I was first teaching them to handle firearms safely


these rifles are also good quality

https://ruger.com/products/1022Carbi...eets/1133.html

https://cz-usa.com/product/cz-457-american/
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Old 10-14-2021, 01:33 PM
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Originally Posted by hardcastonly View Post
https://www.smith-wesson.com/product...617?sku=160578

https://ruger.com/products/markIVSta...ets/40105.html

Ive found both of these handguns to be helpful and useful in training my sons ,
when I was first teaching them to handle firearms safely


these rifles are also good quality

https://ruger.com/products/1022Carbi...eets/1133.html

https://cz-usa.com/product/cz-457-american/
Thanks for the inclusion of the rifles, I'll give them a look!
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Old 10-14-2021, 04:18 PM
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Well Mike BEFORE even buying a firearm of any sort I strongly recommend getting a firearms safety course. Most states have classes for hunter education that are sponsored by the state game/wildlife departments and are usually free. Then there are specific classes such as concealed carry classes you can register for. Prices for these vary. But again, strongly recommended. Safety, safety and safety are the 3 main objectives when handling firearms. Once the trigger is pulled you can't bring that bullet back, just like words out of the mouth. And this isn't a video game where you can reset and start over. Its serious business but can be extremely fun.
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Old 10-14-2021, 05:32 PM
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after selling thousands of hand guns,
my advice is this
start with a 22 as noted, BUT when picking the gun, pick the gun that feels best in your hands and NOT the gun, me or XYZ tell you you, YOU should buy
a gun that fits your hands , you will shoot better and enjoy it more as such

and I agree with getting some training at a good shooting school that has safety test, for you to learn proper ways to both be safe and to learn how to shoot well
FORM matters

after decades of teaching new and well no so new shooters,
the one thing I learned most, is, its a LOT easier to teach a person that knows NOTHING< the RIGHT way to hold and aim and about proper shooting form, than it is to RE teach or break someones BAD habits

learn things right from the start and you will be light years ahead of many folks that have been shooting for yrs!
BAD form is HARD to bear, all the more so on folks that THINK they know what there doing and be stubborn to advice on how to improve them!


and DON"T be intimidated of learning to shoot, by being VERY close to the targets
start close, get confidence and learn, then back up as your experience develops!

and last,
in my experience,
its a LOT easier to learn to shoot with a rifle than it is with a handgun!,
and again a .22 rules this as a starting caliber, ammo is typically the cheapest and there are so many options on rifles, your bound to find one you like and fits you,
and possibly cheap , as there are typically lots of used one's about as well as starter rifles in budgets most all can afford
sitting at a bench, learning from someone that knows how to teach, can make you feel ahead of the game faster, IMO< than trying to start off with a pistol

we all have to start some place if interest is there, as we all didn;'t grow up in hunting and shooting families
I know I didn't, but desire to learn , made me into the hunter shooter I am today!
there is NO shortage of info out there these days too or places to be TAUGHT how too
I learned more the hard way LOL



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