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Noticing a trend with used rifles

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Noticing a trend with used rifles

Old 04-03-2019, 11:34 PM
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Default Noticing a trend with used rifles

I'm noticing a trend on used rifles.

I hit allot of older style gun shops that get allot of used rifles in. I'm seeing allot of them sit on the shelf for a long time. If I had an abundance of money I'd have picked up a closet full already.

these aren't high end collector type rifles. But allot of old Winchester's, Remingtons, marlins and savages. Good, useable, hunting rifles. The "classics"
​​​​​
I think allot of the older guys that had these are dying, going into assisted living type situations, or just retiring and thinning down the herd.

Allot of the younger guys aren't too interested in blued steel and wood. So these rifles are sitting on shelves longer than they used to. Although the prices haven't dropped yet locally. I think eventually they may.

-Jake
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:14 AM
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If it's not tacti-cool and doesn't have "Creed" in the name it seems like people aren't interested

-Jake
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Old 04-04-2019, 06:38 AM
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Pretty difficult to sell a 1992 Ford Tempo in 2019. Just the way it goes.
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Old 04-04-2019, 07:45 AM
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yes Ive noticed a similar trend, the local gun shops all want to give you very little on a trade in,
but want top dollar on the inventory they want too sell, now obviously,
thats more or less the way business has always worked to some extent,
but its damn hard to hand over a rifle in pristine condition ,
that may have had less than three or four boxes of ammo through it,
and in many cases the older rifles were built with higher quality and better fit & finish work,
and accept less than half of what you paid for it , no mater what the time frame,
between the two transactions....especially when its on the shelf marked up to double later on,
marked ON SALE /BARGAIN
so theres a good many guys with a few safe queens they won,t bother trading in.
if you have something unique or in pristine condition or rare,
try to find a local buyer that appreciates what you have for sale.
you might be amazed at what some older rifles and hand guns sell for.
most of the local shops low-ball your guns, in my experience,
no mater the condition or value, hoping to maximize their profits.
ask around if your in the market, you may find a friend that has what you want
,and strike a bargain you both benefit from.

Last edited by hardcastonly; 04-04-2019 at 07:59 AM.
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Old 04-04-2019, 10:33 AM
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I'm pretty fortunate to have a dealer that gives me a fair price for my trade ins. And his mark up isn't really all that bad. But what really gets me is he has a lot of rifles on the used racks that someone put a deposit on and the tags had "sold" on them with the buyers name. There are a lot that I've picked up and asked "does this guy really want this?" I wish he would put these guns on a rack in the back room somewhere.
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:41 PM
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It’s a means of displaying inventory to appear “well stocked” without actually increasing inventory cost. Also a means, in lay away programs, to motivate guys to pay off, since other folks are watching their tags, not being paid off... For new items, it’s a means to continue to display something without increasing inventory cost and ordering a replacement - but knowing another could be available in 2 days.

Really common practice for SOT’s - as long as the product won’t get damaged, it’s a great opportunity to display held inventory and propagate further sales without increasing inventory costs, while the future owner’s application is processed.
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Nomercy448 View Post
Pretty difficult to sell a 1992 Ford Tempo in 2019. Just the way it goes.
However, a 1992 Ford Tempo was a piece of junk when it came off the assembly line, unlike the classic rifles.
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Old 04-04-2019, 03:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Oldtimr View Post
However, a 1992 Ford Tempo was a piece of junk when it came off the assembly line, unlike the classic rifles.
And any 92 tempo in the North is likely rotted in half by now.
​​​​​​ These rifles are mostly as good, other than possible dings or nicks, as the day they were bought new.

-Jake
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Old 04-04-2019, 04:20 PM
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My point was it was just a car, and popular in its day. No different than a Rem 700 or Win 70 from 20-30yrs ago - they were just rifles of their day. We all want to think a 1985 CDL was a fine piece of craftsmanship, but it really was just a rifle, thousands of them made each year. So a low mileage Tempo really isn’t so different than a blued and walnut 1985 700 CDL... just a rifle...

A whole generation of hunters and shooters coached their sons, daughters, and mentees, the next generation of hunters and shooters to get a heavy barreled rifle for varmints, to get stainless rifles for wet conditions, and that dinging up a nice wood stock is criminal... They taught the next generation that buying used might mean buying someone else’s problem, and that buying new for the same price or just a little more as used is often good insurance. It shouldn’t be surprising that they listened and don’t buy blued and walnut rifles.
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Old 04-04-2019, 05:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Nomercy448 View Post
. It shouldn’t be surprising that they listened and don’t buy blued and walnut rifles.
More for me!

-Jake
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