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Buying first rifle

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Buying first rifle

Old 03-06-2013, 09:48 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Default Buying first rifle

Hi,

I'm new to HuntingNet and was hoping to get some feedback from other members on some rifles. I am in the market for my first rifle. Details below.

I've settled on the .30-06 caliber and have a budget of around $1,000 for gun & scope. I would rather not spend the lot but don't want to skimp on quality. This is my first rifle but I want quality that will last a long time.

Looking at both new and used guns, probably leaning more towards a classic Rem 700 or Winchester. I saw a nice 700 from the late 1970s with a 2-7 Leupold scope for $850, I really have no clue what these old rifles are worth. The Tikka T3 Hunter has also caught my eye, I like its trigger, bolt, and overall fit; however I am not a fan of the plastic parts.

Desired Features (in order, aside from the obvious, fit & accuracy):
-Trigger (good trigger, don't know terminology)
-Smooth Bolt
-Wood Stock
-Weight, I hike a lot
-Detachable Magazine
-Stainless barrel

Models I didn't particularly like the fit, but haven't excluded:
-Ruger American
-New Remington 700
-Savage 111 (liked fit/trigger but not bolt/quality) Also shot this gun in .270 and didn't like too much
-Weatherby Vanguard Synthetic (might like wood stock)

Don't like, just don't fit me
-Marlin X7
-Howa 1500
-Ruger M77

Thanks for reading my short story and for any advise.
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Old 03-07-2013, 03:15 AM
  #2  
Typical Buck
 
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I like your idea of finding a classic. I prefer the classics in the bolt actions to me the stocks all fit me well. Some of the newer models even with the same stock design just don't have the fit and weight that I prefer. The only black stock firearm I own is a Rem 870. I too do not care for the black gun fad. I do understand the composite stock being more forgiving in weather but I don't care for them.

I would give the one you have already found a try that's a decent price and the scope is guaranteed. Not many people ever shoot out a barrel in regular hunting so you might be okay in that area. I picked up a 25-06 made in 1976 a few years ago and it is pretty accurate for a rifle made 36 years ago.
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:18 AM
  #3  
Giant Nontypical
 
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I can't help you with which "desired features" - that's your preference.

I can tell you to save half your budget for the mounts, rings & scope.

Get a lifetime warranty................Buy it once !
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:08 AM
  #4  
Spike
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Blackelk:

Thanks for your input, the shop that has this gun has a known blacksmith that looks at all guns before they purchase. So I would expect the barrel to be well checked. What kinds of problems might one run into with a wood stock in weather that wouldn't be an issue with synthetic?

Sheridan:

I've been told by others that the scope is vital, any recomendations? If I were to pick up something like this Remington 700 with a scope already mounted, how can I tell if it's good equipment?

Thanks
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:36 AM
  #5  
Nontypical Buck
 
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I believe the Vanguard and Howa 1500 are pretty much the same rifle.
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Old 03-07-2013, 10:46 AM
  #6  
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What is the name brand of the scope? If it is a Tasco, BSA or Simmons they may not hold zero very well with a heavy recoiling rifle such as a 30-06. I suggest you look at a Leupold VXII or a Burris Fullfield. Both are good scopes that can handle a 30-06.

And congrats on your first rifle!
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Old 03-07-2013, 10:51 AM
  #7  
Nontypical Buck
 
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What kinds of problems might one run into with a wood stock in weather that wouldn't be an issue with synthetic?
Well here in Arizona we don't normally have this problem...but I believe it has to do with moisture (IE: rain, snow) causing the wood to expand, coming into contact with the barrel and moving it out of zero. I think that is the issue anyway. I have the opposite problem of trying to keep the wood from drying out!
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Old 03-07-2013, 10:52 AM
  #8  
Nontypical Buck
 
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If the old Remington is is good shape, and comes with the leupold, grab it. In answer to your question, wood changes shape in heavy humidity, and again when it dries out, which will change your point of impact. The upside, wood looks good, plastic is ugly, but stable.
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Old 03-07-2013, 11:00 AM
  #9  
Typical Buck
 
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It looks like you're really limiting yourself with the requirements/likes/dislikes you stated in your first post. The fit of the stock can be changed, by a gunsmith or by yourself. I'm not a gunsmith, but I've changed or replaced the stocks on most of my rifles and shotguns.


You didn't state what or where you will be hunting. IMO the old .30-06 is still a great cartridge. It was my first cartridge many, many years ago.


With the current gun buying fenzy that our idiot political leaders have created, I'm not up on current prices and values, but $850 for a 40 year old 700 and 2-7x Leupold seems high. Maybe I'm living too far in the past.


I've had three, and still have two Rem 700s. Two of them were pawn shop finds. They all have always worked good for me, and I've killed a pile of North American and African critters with them.


My .300 Weatherby Vanguard is one of my favorite rifles. Except for the biggest and meanest creatures, it has all of the accuracy and power that I'll ever want. I did however modify it a bit, including putting it in an AA fancy walnut stock.


As for scopes, I have Leupolds on three of my rifles, including a 2-7x on my .375 RUM which has been on two African hunts. I've had a 6x Leupold on my .257 AI for over 30 years, and probably half of all of the North American big game animals that I've ever killed were with that rifle and scope, including several bighorn and Dall rams.


I also have Weaver scopes on three of my rifles. A 10x Weaver has been on my .22-250 for over 30 years and had killed a ton of varmints and put quite a few deer and pronghorn antelope in my freezer. The 3-9x Weaver on my .30-06/.30 Gibbs kept my freezer full of elk meat for almost 40 years. Another 3-9x Weaver came on one of my pawn shop Rem 700 7mm Rem mags and I've used it on two African hunts and several North American hunts including a Canadian hunt where it put two critters into the B&C record book.


You don't have to break the bank on your first rifle and scope. Anything that you get can be modified, upgraded, or replaced if you need to at a later date. You could easily get a lifetime of hunting enjoyment from that Rem 700 .30-06 and Leupold 2-7x. Check that the bore is clean and in good shape, work the bolt, safety and trigger, and make sure that the scope is clear and doesn't have any dings on the tube.
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Old 03-07-2013, 11:09 AM
  #10  
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IMO the old .30-06 is still a great cartridge.
+1
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