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Dad had a stroke, and it's difficult as his daughter

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Dad had a stroke, and it's difficult as his daughter

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Old 09-05-2015, 07:22 AM
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Unhappy Dad had a stroke, and it's difficult as his daughter

Sorry in advance, but I need to dump this on someone, and I'm hoping people here will understand. This is also rather long.

My Dad had a stroke about a year ago. He had initially shown some progress but seems to be getting worse in recent months. He has weakness on his right side and has trouble walking over broken ground or high grass and can no longer shoot his bow.

He can still shoot his rifle. However, he has become impulsive and sometimes makes poor decisions. I worry about such things as his not checking for down-range targets. I've been considering broaching the subject of using a crossbow, since that would be easier than a bow yet have a shorter range than a rifle.

I guess this is the most difficult part for me as his daughter. He has some issues with bladder and bm control. I've taken care of him for a few days at a time to give my step mom a break. But that was at his home, and I could easily enough clean up the floors and toss clothes and sheets in the washer. These things would be difficult in deer camp.

My BIL helped last year, but he has expressed that he doesn't feel comfortable taking Dad hunting now. I can do a number of necessary things, like dress a deer, and I can track like a bloodhound. But I have health issues of my own and don't have the strength/stamina to drag a deer long distances or other things that require strength, things that my Dad did when we hunted all these years.

I guess I said all that to ask: what can I do to help my Dad hunt successfully and with dignity?

Thanks.
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Old 09-05-2015, 08:33 AM
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I am sorry to hear that about your dad. I watched as my dad had to struggle more and more to hunt until he just finally had to give it up. It is hard to see strong people go backwards and the best we can do is help until the helping is over our head. You should call the office of aging in your county and check into the visiting nurse program to help take some of the load off you and your mother. Medicare/medicaid should take care of that. Talk to him about the good times you had hunting with him and help him reminisce, it will help you too.

Last edited by Oldtimr; 09-05-2015 at 08:37 AM.
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Old 09-05-2015, 09:06 AM
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Thanks Oldtimr. I appreciate your words.
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Old 09-05-2015, 10:06 AM
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My father has disc problems with his lower spine and knee problems that have him concerned about being able to hunt this year. He also has been boozing to the point that I am concerned he will be drinking if we are out hunting.

I remember him getting me out to deer hunt one time when I was on medical leave from the Air Force in 1999. He made it easy for a guy with a fractured ankle to hunt by setting me up close to the parking spot. (Guess what BigBuck I have no disabililty payout like you think everyone who gets injured gets.) He had a blind set up for me with a comfortable chair and blankets. The hunting was as easy as moving about the house. I know I owe him for that so I am going to try my best.

One thing I am going to need is a nice deer cart because I will be hauling the deer myself for now on. I am still young enough to be a brute but do not want to get any injuries that I can avoid from dragging a deer out of the woods. I am learning that it I do not heal as quick as I used to and from watching my father I learned that old trouble spots on your body will wear out easily when you get to a certain mileage.

I know my experiences are different than yours but I see hope in turkey and coyote hunting. I see them as less strenuous activities and the game are lighter. I am going to try using blinds this year for predator hunting, it could make for a comfortable deer hunt with the right chair for my father. This property I will be using the blind at has easy truck access through all the fields and a nice concrete ford to drive across the river, thanks to the farmers.

Keep thinking about making it easy for him and yourself and we can try to give the best advice we can. Sorry about your situation, just try to remember all the good times hunting you had and stay positive. I hope things work out.
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Old 09-05-2015, 10:14 AM
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A lot of good points already made. D80 made an interesting one as well. Different kinds of hunting might be less strenuous and easier for both of you physically. When I was a kid, I remember a neighbor and his dad taking me pheasant hunting at a club that I eventually joined. It wasn't difficult hunting (physically) but I absolutely loved watching the dogs work and also got my own dog and trained him (fond memories). Getting old and/or less mobile or more infirm is not a fun subject for any of us. Maybe you should talk with your dad about what he thinks is a solution. He might have some ideas too. Good luck and let us know how it works out. And enjoy the time you still have with your dad of course.
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Old 09-08-2015, 06:27 PM
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I think I've come up with the game plan that I'm going to drive him out to a ground blind and get him settled. Then I'll go park the truck out a ways, walk back in, and sit with him. We can talk or nap. I've given myself permission, I guess, to just focus on spending time with him and not worrying about getting him on a deer. Thanks for letting me bend yall's ears.
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Old 09-09-2015, 05:19 AM
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Good plan, good attitude.
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Old 09-19-2015, 09:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Rushlight View Post
I think I've come up with the game plan that I'm going to drive him out to a ground blind and get him settled. Then I'll go park the truck out a ways, walk back in, and sit with him. We can talk or nap. I've given myself permission, I guess, to just focus on spending time with him and not worrying about getting him on a deer. Thanks for letting me bend yall's ears.
There you go. That sounds like a plan and a resolution. Good luck and God bless you and your Dad.
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