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Bow hunting whitetail is hard!

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Old 11-09-2019, 03:37 PM
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Default Bow hunting whitetail is hard!

Lol - I know - if it were easy, they'd call it bow killing.

This is my first year bow hunting whitetail (I've been rifle hunting for the last 10 years) - figured it was time to learn something new.

Went out to the tree stand this morning and got surprised by not one, not two, but THREE bucks (at different times within the span of 2.5 hours). 1 spike and two very nice 4 pointers.

The first one (spike) marched up from behind me, sounding like 250 lb person on the icy leaves ha ha. I was seated and froze when I heard the steps. Before I knew it, he was 15 yards to my left, would've been a perfect shot, but I didn't think I could stand and draw without being busted, so I just let him walk by. He never knew I was there.

Second buck (4 pointer) appeared out of nowhere to my right, about 25-30 yards away. Same deal - didn't think I could move without being detected. He was on the move (slowly, but deliberately) and never really stopped.

Third buck came from where the first one did, but once appearing on my left, he started to move further away to the left. Once again, I was seated and felt he'd bust me if I stood, removed my bow from the hanger, got in position to shoot, etc.

I don't rifle hunt from this stand, so I'm just learning their patterns in this section of woods, but damn I feel like a noob ha ha. Good news is I'm seeing deer and they aren't seeing me.

So for the experienced bow hunters - do you guys generally stand most of the time you're out there? Any tips on how I can better be prepared to take a shot?
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Old 11-09-2019, 03:58 PM
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You can shoot seated if you practice doing it..
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Old 11-09-2019, 05:13 PM
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I was thinking that while I was out there, but haven't tried that / practiced that at all, so didn't do it.

I will definitely practice that now!
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:10 AM
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Sounds like this was very recent and the rut was approaching with the bucks searching for hot does. It may be HARD for some. I don't find it hard at all but more so challenging. The trick is to spend as much time in the woods as you can and to see them before they are on top of you. Oh yes I've been caught with my pants down many times. (sometimes literally..LOL).
Days like you described are fantastic. I have a personal little honey hold that has an old railroad bed running perpendicular to the prevailing wind. I set my tree stand within bow range of it. As the rut draws closer the buck use that old railroad bed moving along quickly testing the wind for hot does. In that stand I've counted as many as 7 buck in one morning using that trail. And a couple times I've had numerous buck chasing several doe. I was like a ballerina in the stand trying to get set up for a shot.
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by bronko22000 View Post
. I was like a ballerina in the stand trying to get set up for a shot.
Now that made me laugh

-Jake
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Old 11-14-2019, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Bocajnala View Post
Now that made me laugh

-Jake
Jake that was the most fun I ever had in a stand without getting an animal. They'd run past on my left, then the right, back behind me, in front of me. The does often stopped right in front of me but as soon as the buck that was chasing her would get too close she was off again. If she would have waited for him I might have gotten a shot. Now if she stood for him, being a gentleman, I would have waited until they were done. Then shot him!! LOL
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Old 11-14-2019, 11:21 AM
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Default know when to draw back your bow & when not to draw

Originally Posted by bronko22000 View Post
Jake that was the most fun I ever had in a stand without getting an animal. They'd run past on my left, then the right, back behind me, in front of me. The does often stopped right in front of me but as soon as the buck that was chasing her would get too close she was off again. If she would have waited for him I might have gotten a shot. Now if she stood for him, being a gentleman, I would have waited until they were done. Then shot him!! LOL
I
It depends on your situation at the time you want to draw back your bow to shoot a deer.
•If the deer is walking, let him get pass you with a quartering away shot. Draw, aim, let her fly. Their senses are not as sharp when they are on the move.
•If the the deer is moving in a slow grazing pace. Wait until the deer’s head is behind a tree or other. That way the deer will not see you draw. Draw your bow back at that time. Try to be as quiet as possible. If you have noisy clothing or bow. He most likely will stop. Unfortunately his vitals will be behind the tree. I found that timing is everything. If you draw the very second his nose gets to the tree. If he hears you, his eyes will be behind the tree when he stops. And his vitals wide open.
•When you commit yourself to drawing. Follow through and at that point don’t worry about if his saw or heard you. YOU MUST GET YOUR PIN ON TARGET & PULL THE TRIGGER. Let that meat eater fly!!!
•When hunting with a bow. Always pay attention to the wind. If you want to get close and undetected. YOU MUST STAY AWAY FROM HIS NOSE. If he smells you, its game over!!! Hang them stands down wind of those deer trails, bedding area’s and food plots. GOOD LUCK HUNTING!!!
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Old 11-14-2019, 02:49 PM
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Originally Posted by JoeMcNamara View Post

I
It depends on your situation at the time you want to draw back your bow to shoot a deer.
•If the deer is walking, let him get pass you with a quartering away shot. Draw, aim, let her fly. Their senses are not as sharp when they are on the move.
•If the the deer is moving in a slow grazing pace. Wait until the deer’s head is behind a tree or other. That way the deer will not see you draw. Draw your bow back at that time. Try to be as quiet as possible. If you have noisy clothing or bow. He most likely will stop. Unfortunately his vitals will be behind the tree. I found that timing is everything. If you draw the very second his nose gets to the tree. If he hears you, his eyes will be behind the tree when he stops. And his vitals wide open.
•When you commit yourself to drawing. Follow through and at that point don’t worry about if his saw or heard you. YOU MUST GET YOUR PIN ON TARGET & PULL THE TRIGGER. Let that meat eater fly!!!
•When hunting with a bow. Always pay attention to the wind. If you want to get close and undetected. YOU MUST STAY AWAY FROM HIS NOSE. If he smells you, its game over!!! Hang them stands down wind of those deer trails, bedding area’s and food plots. GOOD LUCK HUNTING!!!
Joe I've been bowhunting for over 55 years now and I've pretty much learned every trick a whitetail can play on you! Fortunately I've been able to out wit them just about every year. In all those years I've been hunting whitetails there has only been maybe 5 years that I didn't fill a tag. Normally most years I am lucky enough to fill a couple. This year my count is up to 2. I have 2 more tags but I'll be happy with just one more. (If I decide to take one.) But your advice is spot on.

Last edited by bronko22000; 11-15-2019 at 06:35 AM.
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Old 11-15-2019, 05:13 AM
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Originally Posted by JoeMcNamara View Post
It depends on your situation at the time you want to draw back your bow to shoot a deer.
•If the deer is walking, let him get pass you with a quartering away shot. Draw, aim, let her fly. Their senses are not as sharp when they are on the move.
•If the the deer is moving in a slow grazing pace. Wait until the deer’s head is behind a tree or other. That way the deer will not see you draw. Draw your bow back at that time. Try to be as quiet as possible. If you have noisy clothing or bow. He most likely will stop. Unfortunately his vitals will be behind the tree. I found that timing is everything. If you draw the very second his nose gets to the tree. If he hears you, his eyes will be behind the tree when he stops. And his vitals wide open.
•When you commit yourself to drawing. Follow through and at that point don’t worry about if his saw or heard you. YOU MUST GET YOUR PIN ON TARGET & PULL THE TRIGGER. Let that meat eater fly!!!
•When hunting with a bow. Always pay attention to the wind. If you want to get close and undetected. YOU MUST STAY AWAY FROM HIS NOSE. If he smells you, its game over!!! Hang them stands down wind of those deer trails, bedding area’s and food plots. GOOD LUCK HUNTING!!!
Thanks Joe - good tips for sure - much appreciated!
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Old 11-30-2019, 12:57 PM
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Bow hunting whitetail can be difficult depending on how you are hunting. Hunting over food plots or bait is insanely simple. Only thing that will matter is your set up and how good you can shoot your bow. Hunting 100% wild mountain whitetail without any agricultural areas, no bait, or scents can be some of the toughest hunting. You will have to do your homework and definitely watch the wind. Your set up will be everything and if you are detected enough they will learn to avoid you. In my state baiting with food, salt, mineral attractants, or using any urine or excretions is banned. Can use rattle antlers, grunts, and bleats.
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