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How do you prepare for the season?

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How do you prepare for the season?

Old 06-16-2012, 01:04 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Join Date: Jun 2012
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Question How do you prepare for the season?

Hello! I'm a brand new female archer, light build, shooting a Diamond Razor Edge at about 45lbs draw weight without a trigger. I've only been shooting for about six months now, and my skill set rests where I can land bulls from 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70ft, but not consistently enough at the long distances that I'd be comfortable hunting, not anywhere close. At 70 I'm still shooting about 1 bullseye for every fifteen, twenty arrows shot and I'd like to get my ratio at 1 in 3 at the very least before I actually go hunting. I don't expect to be out until the 2013 season, but I'm practicing as often as I can until then.

Anyways, my question for all of you is how do you prepare yourself for a hunting season? Any tricks of the trade I should focus on, nitty-gritty things I make sure I cover, techniques or routines that have worked well for you? I only have a peep sight now but I've got my eye on a nice 5-pin sight, so tips for both would be outstanding. I'm just working with a box target, no funds for a model one.

Sorry if that's still a bit vague, but any help at all would be fantastic! Thanks in advance (:

-Poppy
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:12 PM
  #2  
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you definately need to buy a good front sight. if you are shooting with only a peep sight on your string, you are pretty much shooting instinctive. this style shooting can be done accurately but takes most archers years to get down pact. if you bolt on a front sight, you could be shooting accurately out to 40 yards, not feet, within a couple hours. i would also suggest buying a release when you can. this in itself will improve your accuracy a bunch.
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Old 06-17-2012, 07:57 AM
  #3  
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Originally Posted by CamoCop View Post
you definately need to buy a good front sight. if you are shooting with only a peep sight on your string, you are pretty much shooting instinctive. this style shooting can be done accurately but takes most archers years to get down pact. if you bolt on a front sight, you could be shooting accurately out to 40 yards, not feet, within a couple hours. i would also suggest buying a release when you can. this in itself will improve your accuracy a bunch.
Some pretty good suggestions here. I would also add, that since you are new and in need of guidance, start looking for a local archery club to join and get some hands on advice from some of the target shooters. Accuracy is paramount when hunting and this means havin good fitting equipment and form, which most target shooters have down pat. Hands-on coaching is always preferrable to what you'll get on internet forums.

How to find a local club? Very simply ask at the local pro-shop.
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Old 06-17-2012, 02:35 PM
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Hi Poppy127, and welcome to the site. CammoCop and Bigfisher are correct about getting a good site and practice. How are your shots at 30 -40 yards? That is about the distance you will need to be more consitant with in say a 6 inch diameter bullseye. I think if you get your hunting bow set up and get in alot of practice, you should beable to go out hunting this season that starts in September if you want. Give us some more information about your shooting abilities and maybe someone else will chime in.

CVG Ohio
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Old 06-18-2012, 07:37 AM
  #5  
Spike
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Thank you all for your help!

CamoCop: All of those are on my to-do list, I'm just lacking the funds. I've had the chance to try shooting with a release and while at the time it lowered my accuracy I understand that I'll need practice with it and plan on giving it another shot.

Bigfisher: There isn't currently an archery club in my area, or at least within half an hour's drive, but before the end of the summer am open archery range is being built at a local park, and I'm hopeful that it will bring more archers together and I can get advice there.

CVG Ohio: Right now at 30-40 I'm hitting 9 out of every 10 arrows on the target but only 1 out of every 10 as a bullseye A lot of room for improvement...
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Old 06-18-2012, 03:51 PM
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Stay at it Poppy,if You push Yourself and get tired Your over doing it and need to take a break...You need to get good and accurate at 30 and 40 yards then move out to a further distance gradually.Be sure to use the same weight broadheads as the field points you target practice with.


My God Woman...what are You planning on shooting from 50-60 and 70 yards?

My max is 30-40 yards using a Jennings Rackmaster Bow set at 55-60 pounds and I'm Hunting Deer and possibly Turkeys with the option of putting an arrow into a Coyote every now and then!



Personally I would have a D-loop put on your string and use some type of wrist/hand release to keep You centered on the string for more accurate shooting.Buy yourself one of those bright yellow bag targets and simply hang it up between 2 steel fence post by wire and shoot at it.If Your planning on Deer Hunting I would also try shooting from an elevated platform or tree stand if possible to get an idea of shooting downward at a target/animal.
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Old 06-18-2012, 03:56 PM
  #7  
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P.S.

Good Form will make You a better and more Accurate Shooter,be sure not to turque the Bow when shooting and stay at it...its great to see another Lady Hunter out there that enjoys the Outdoors and Hunting.Let Us know how things are working out and if You improve on Your Accuracy?

You definetly need to get You a 3 to 5 pin sight,it will help You a lot in ranging further out and most sights also have a bubble-level on it so You can make sure Your keeping your bow level when shooting.Usually before Hunting Season I practice a few times a day and try not to over do it and get tired or strain my arms and muscles,as I mentioned earlier it pays to do some shooting practice on a high deck shooting downward or from out of a ladder stand if possible?I also practice some while sitting in a chair with no arms as if I'm hunting out of a ground blind...and I can tell You its a whole different world shooting at a live Animal/Deer.....especially when they come in close,its a thrill beyond compare and it make take a while to take something with a Bow,but its an accomplishment You'll forever remember and want more of as You get better and better!

Above all be careful,wear a safety harness when up a tree in a climber or ladder stand and enjoy being outside even if You don't harvest an Animal!

GTOHunter in Missouri

Last edited by GTOHunter; 06-18-2012 at 04:08 PM.
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Old 06-18-2012, 07:28 PM
  #8  
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Here's more fodder for you to consider: Chose a simple, durable broadhead. This is a personal thing ... I did not care for more than 3 pins. More pins than that were simply too "busy" for me. Work on form more often than you work on "long distance" shooting. Aim small = hit small. If you can find a 3-D course near by try it out. Will help you learn to judge distance. If you plan to hunt from an elevated position such as a ladder or climbing stand, practice as much as you can from an elevated position 15 feet +/- above your target. Buy a "deer" target. In my opinion using a deer form target will help you picture the correct shot placement .... when the time comes, you can put the arrow through the deer at the correct angle to slice through vitals, resulting in a clean kill. Don't lose sight of the fact that your "kill shot" will almost always be the first and usually only shot that you get. So from time to time, shot at your target "cold turkey" ... and just one time. And concentrate on making that single shot count !

Most of all, prepare yourself for frustration. You'll likely see many, many deer but have only a few shot opportunities each season. Take it all in and have fun. It won't last forever .... trust me on that.
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Old 06-24-2012, 01:52 PM
  #9  
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Practice makes perfect. i've been in this game over 55 years. I have lots of tackle so send me a PM list of things you need. I have tons of tackle (some older but very good). I know I have a very good nearly new 3 pin hunting sight, at least 1 release & much more. IF your legit, like I said send me the list of NEEDED things. i've outfitted more than 1 person (a grown son, Daughter, 2 son-in-laws & G-son) & they are all Bowhunters now..
This pic was in 2010 when my Daughter took her 1st with a 48# Compound.
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Old 06-24-2012, 04:57 PM
  #10  
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yeah i would set your sights ranging from 10-40 yards
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