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Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop -Oct 2 update

Old 08-25-2004, 09:27 PM
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Default Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop -Oct 2 update

Well - I've never really put in a cover crop per se - but plan on putting in a 2 acre rye crop next week. Rye is not new for us - we plant a couple acres most years as a fall attractant. This year however - I ended up with abut 400 lbs "extra" Urea - from my corn project - and I do not want to waste it - so -we plan to plant the Rye - and put down 200 lbs/acre of urea at planting. The two acre plot was hay - with timothy, red clover, and some weeds like goldenrod.

The goal would be for the Rye to take in the Nitrogen as well as possible. In May we will plow it under and put in a Roundup Ready corn plot.

Does anyone purposely use Rye, or other fall planted plots to hold the Nitrogen content for Spring?? Is there a residual loss - or can I assume the soil will have 200 lbs/acre 46-0-0 (Urea) -plus its normal amount of N (from the soil sample).


We plowed today - I'll post pictures when I get them.
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Old 08-26-2004, 08:02 AM
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Default RE: Rye as a Cover Crop?

Interesting question, and I am looking forward to someone with some expert knowledge in the area to reply. The clover (depending on the amount) may supply some extra nitrogen as well. As I understand it, the organic material from the rye will take some time to release it's nutrients after it is plowed, and therefore may not be available for the corn crop immediately. Then hard telling how much nitrogen will be lost in the air or will have leached out. Then you have the soil type variable thrown in as well. I do not have the expertise to answer this question, but my guess would be definetly not to expect all of it to be available.
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Old 08-26-2004, 11:31 AM
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Default RE: Rye as a Cover Crop?

NO EXPERT Try http://www.sarep.ucdavis.edu/cgi-win...e/show_crop_12
whew. Pages of information on Rye cereal grain. ie "Rye produces several compounds that inhibit crops and weeds. The most active compounds are two hydroxamic acids and there breakdown products." If any of that made you drool for more, well you've got the web site.
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Old 08-27-2004, 06:52 AM
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Default RE: Rye as a Cover Crop?

Sean I tried rye once for a cover crop for a garden, for some reason I wasnt able to plow it under early and it grew and when i did moldboard plow it, it was a mess I thought I never would get the mess disced and worked up right, Rye grows so tall, wheat or barley might be a better choice for plowdown.
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Old 09-05-2004, 07:26 PM
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Default RE: Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop - planted

We had between 3 & 5" of rain the last week that delayed the planting, but we got it done today, 9/5/04.

We decided on Rye because it was very cheap - and we know it does well for us - Hopefully Ron, we'll be able to work it early in May.

I put 180lbs of Combined Rye down on the 2 acre plot ($25.00). Also, about 400 lbs of UREA (46-0-0). I broadcast the rye, and fertilizer - the disked the whole plot once more. Finally, a Rolled it flat with a double cast iron pulverizer that we picked for 0$$ last year - it did a good job leveling the field. The field requied ALOT of disking - it was heavy sod.

Here's to hoping the Rye will hold over the Nitrogen - Next year - this field will be Round-up Corn.







Thanks for looking

FH
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Old 09-06-2004, 08:22 AM
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Default RE: Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop - planted

Sean with that much fertilizer and it being urea you are going to have some awfully tall and course stemmed rye, you are going to have to plow it down before May, now your seasons are different than ours, I would plow it down here at the end of Mar or first of April, I dont think discing it will work with that much urea, although I dont know how big or heavty your disc is, ours is 36 ft and would be big enough, you might have to resort to moldboard plowing to turn it under, then disc and work it up for corn.. I dont know how much residual fert you will have, some no doubt, but will need to add a little for the corn and I trust it will be a Monsanto brand , hint.. Good luck and never ve afraid to try new things and be innovative with different crops and farming methods.. Ron
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Old 09-07-2004, 01:01 PM
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Default RE: Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop - planted

Annual rye is great choice for a fall attractant, and if you have a way to work them in, oats can be a great addition. What I to do is to plant annual rye, Buck Forage Oats(will stay green about a month longer and highly prefered by deer), and a combination of clover.

What happens with a rye/oats/clover planting is this:

They rye is your "sure thing". It will grow the best under the conditions and is basically fail proof. The oats are your "candy" and are much preferred over the rye...but it's very important to buy Buck forage oats or similar cold weather variet, not just MI oats. BFO are made to be cold tolerant and have multiple shoots for grazing. What will take place is that the rye and oats will be your targeted fall attractant, with the clover starting to become established. If you planted all rye and no oats though, your clover will have a harder time competing in the spring, but by planting the oats, 1/2 your grain crop(oats) will freeze out and die during the winter, so you are left with only a 1/2 covering of grains in your field next year which will help your clover to become established. At the same time, the rye will be the forage that is available the earliest in the spring for your returning deer....usually a couple weeks before even a well established clover field, let alone a new one planted the previous fall.

On that planting I the frost-seed in the same clover mix, with the addition of a good brassica mix in the spring. I then take the same planting, and a few weeks before it's anniversary I kill the worst 1/2 and re-plant with the same fall attractant(rye/oats and clover). You end up planting each 1/2 of the field on a rotational basis every other year, but you always maintain a strong base of clover, with your planting efforts each year targeting a great fall attractant for your enjoyment during hunting season. The addition of the frost-seeded brassica offers a great variety and substantial nutrients to your clover field and if they last into hunting season, great, if not, your deer still had the added benifit of the plant throughout the year.

This year most of my plantings were 100#'s BFO per acre, 25#'s annual rye per acre, and the recommended amount of clover or Imperial Extreme per acre, all planted on 8/8. Looking great so far!

I used to go with more of a clover/rye blend, but the rye is a pain to deal with the following summer and in limited quantities, coupled with the oats, it does not have a noticable effect on the growth or establishment of the clover throughout the spring and summer months.
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Old 09-07-2004, 09:53 PM
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Default RE: Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop - planted

Hi Ron - Thanks for your advice -

You are probably right about the rye growing fast. If things were perfect - it would grow to 6-8" this fall, then go dormant in October. If like past years - the deer will eat it so it looks like green paint on the ground by the time the snows really come in Dec.

In April, we would maybe start to see some new growth again. Historically for us - for May in CNY, the rye would be about 8" tall around the 1st week in May - this is when I would like to plow.

I was worried that winter wheat or Barely would not winter over - and I knew rye would. I wasn't sure that if the crop died off in winter - if Nitrogen would leach out. I wish I'd thought to pick up a few pounds of another seed type to try - just for fun.

If the Rye gets too tall, I guess we'll have to mow it before plowing.

NORTH JEFF - Thanks for your input - I've followed your posts as long as you/I have been posting - with great interest. It really sounds like your land has come a long ways since we first conversed - I'm really glad for you. Your program and mine are similar - but you started with less deer/sq. mile. It sounds like you are making up ground in a big way.

Thanks again

FH
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Old 09-08-2004, 08:22 AM
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Default RE: Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop - planted

"I've followed your posts as long as you/I have been posting - with great interest."

Same here!

There are a few of us out there that do all we can with what we have and each of us share an extreme passion towards our "hobby". In fact, it basically is just about a way of life and has definately added to the enjoyment of hunting, the overall use of our land, the appreciation for habitat and wildlife, and just plain fun.

If you told me I could manage deer and habitat or hunt...easy choice....I'd manage!
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Old 09-08-2004, 09:10 AM
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Default RE: Fall 2004 Rye Cover Crop - planted

I don't mean to jump in but I just started the food plot thing 2 years ago. Both of you have helped me out in your posts and I want to say thank you for that.

Jeff - I never did find the BFO until after I planted the regular ones. They are coming up good right now. I am already planning on another plot for next year and I will be getting the BFO by then. Actually the Gander Mountain here just got some. Too late for me this year. Do you think I could get a bag now and plant them next fall or should I wait and pick up a fresh bag next year?

Farm hunter - I got to looking at our place last weekend and I can see what you ment about the browse line. The plan we are working on will be to take 8 doe and 4 buck this fall. We do have a very large deer population and our deer do run small body size for WI. A big doe will field dress at 120.

If you told me I could manage deer and habitat or hunt...easy choice....I'd manage!
I have come to think of managing deer and habitat and hunting to be the same thing. It has added a great deal to the overall experience. I don't think I could give it up either.

Thanks guys.
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