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Anyone know what this upper state NY shrub is??

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Anyone know what this upper state NY shrub is??

Old 09-28-2009, 04:40 PM
  #11  
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The Gray Dogwood is considered moderate deer browse around here, especially in the Mtns.

Based on the height of the barberry in your pic, I would say its the "Common Barberry" species.

Japanese Barberry looks very similar but doesn't get that tall, that I know of. There is some "American Barberry" that grows in my area, but it has jagged leaves. Other than songbirds, not sure much else uses it.

Here's some info on Common Barberry.

http://www.threatsummary.forestthrea...m?threatID=238

Gray Dogwood.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CORA6
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Old 05-09-2010, 05:37 PM
  #12  
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It just seems as though the deer, through selective browsing, destroy all the plants they like, leaving the plants they avoid to thrive. Not sure how far this holds though... In very heavily browsed areas are the barberry and autum olive eaten??
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Old 05-12-2010, 11:46 AM
  #13  
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You would be doing more for wildlife on your property by getting rid of the Barberry and Autumn Olive. Both are exotic invasive species that will crowd out more beneficial native vegetation. If you want shrubs for deer and other wildife I would plant shrubs from the viburnum family. Many produce berries and are popular food sources for an array of wildlife.
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Old 05-12-2010, 04:25 PM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by carl1191 View Post
You would be doing more for wildlife on your property by getting rid of the Barberry and Autumn Olive. Both are exotic invasive species that will crowd out more beneficial native vegetation. If you want shrubs for deer and other wildife I would plant shrubs from the viburnum family. Many produce berries and are popular food sources for an array of wildlife.
Yes. The problem... the viburnium seedlings will get browsed down immediately while the invasives are left to thrive....
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Old 05-12-2010, 06:01 PM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by Robertesq1 View Post
Yes. The problem... the viburnium seedlings will get browsed down immediately while the invasives are left to thrive....
If or when you were to plant the shrubs you would defenitely have to tube them to protect them until they are big enough to withstand browsing. But by doing some kind of control on the invasives, you will be promoting native vegetation to grow. Just trying to say that for the long term health of the habitat on your property it would be wise to try to practice some sort of control on the Barberry and Autumn Olive. I could defenitely find the best control methods for you if you want. I know barbarry is easy to kill, but I'm not as familiar with controlling Autumn Olive.
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Old 05-13-2010, 06:28 AM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by carl1191 View Post
If or when you were to plant the shrubs you would defenitely have to tube them to protect them until they are big enough to withstand browsing. But by doing some kind of control on the invasives, you will be promoting native vegetation to grow. Just trying to say that for the long term health of the habitat on your property it would be wise to try to practice some sort of control on the Barberry and Autumn Olive. I could defenitely find the best control methods for you if you want. I know barbarry is easy to kill, but I'm not as familiar with controlling Autumn Olive.

I know, I know.... its just that for the shrubs/trres to reach a size/height to withstand hungry deer can be a decade of tubing and then, fencing. Its slow, expensive and a losing battle. What I've been doing is going to the nursuries in the fall and buying up their 8-10 foot fruit trees for $20 bucks apiece (they don't want to be bothered digging them in for the winter). Actually its cheaper and you get results in just a year or so (fruit not browse). I fertilize the plants which are browsed by the deer (blackberry dogwoods etc) to give them a leg up but its also a losing battle. The only thing that works is planting a winter crop like turnips which "sweeten" after they freeze and provide a favored food in late winter when deer are most aggressive.

The barberry does provide cover and the autum olive new shoots seem to get browsed in spring. what do u think kills the autom olive other than repeated mowing???
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Old 05-13-2010, 03:17 PM
  #17  
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Autumn Olives are not that difficult to kill, but impossible to eradicate in my opinion. Mechanical means such as digging or pulling out is probably best where applicable. Several chemicals will also kill it, some through foliar treatments, but the most effective is applying the chemical to the cut stump immediately after cutting. Glyphosate/Roundup, Imazapyr/Arsenal AC, Triclopyr are a few known chemical controls for Autumn Olive.

This site has those chemicals listed with prices to give an idea of their uses and cost: http://www.keystonepestsolutions.com/

Mowing/bushhogging might keep them under control and may even kill seedlings, but it will not always kill established shrubs. I know of a field that was not mowed for 6 years and the autumn olives became abundant. The same field, for the last 4 years has been mowed 2 times every year and the autumn olives are still living, waiting for their chance to take off.
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Old 05-13-2010, 07:22 PM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by haystack View Post
Autumn Olives are not that difficult to kill, but impossible to eradicate in my opinion. Mechanical means such as digging or pulling out is probably best where applicable. Several chemicals will also kill it, some through foliar treatments, but the most effective is applying the chemical to the cut stump immediately after cutting. Glyphosate/Roundup, Imazapyr/Arsenal AC, Triclopyr are a few known chemical controls for Autumn Olive.

This site has those chemicals listed with prices to give an idea of their uses and cost: http://www.keystonepestsolutions.com/

Mowing/bushhogging might keep them under control and may even kill seedlings, but it will not always kill established shrubs. I know of a field that was not mowed for 6 years and the autumn olives became abundant. The same field, for the last 4 years has been mowed 2 times every year and the autumn olives are still living, waiting for their chance to take off.
Like haystack said, the best and most effective long term control is to chemicaly treat it. A 50-50 mixture of water and glyphosate applied to the cut stump would be the cheapest control method. Garlon 4 (triclopry) can cost upwards of $100 a gallon. The cut stump method can be used basically year round. If you wanted to go with Garlon 4, you would mix it with bark oil (a penetrating oil) at a rate of 26 oz garlon per gallon. I've had great success with both methods.
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