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Copper bullets better for deer Hunting?

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Copper bullets better for deer Hunting?

Old 04-20-2021, 05:45 AM
  #11  
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Well I might as well throw in my 2 cents. As far as lead vs non-lead bullets, when the proper selection is made to caliber and game being hunted, both will do the job and you will harvest your game. There have been so much game taken using lead jacketed and lead cast bullet that its obvious they work. The non-lead bullets also work. So IMO use what shoots best in your rifle. Shot placement is more critical than bullet selection provided your selection is correct for the game being hunted. Also you absolutely do not need a premium bullet to kill a deer. Unless they shoot a lot better than a standard Remington CorLokt or Federal Power Shock or the like don't waste your money. Buy more of the lesser priced bullets and practice more!
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Old 05-11-2021, 08:17 AM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by hardcastonly View Post
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you can reduce copper bore fouling measurably by dropping all your unloaded projectiles in a small plastic container and pouring in some MOLY powder lube, and shaking the contents for a few minutes, this will leave a micro coating on the projectile surfaces
repeated use of moly spray used by swabbing the rifling in the bore with moly before you put the rifle away after its cleaned and before you shoot the gun when you can do so also tends to reduce copper fouling


ebay.com/itm/Lyman-Super-Moly-Spray-4-oz-7631417-Bullet-Barrel-Lube-Mould-Release/124566368889?epid=1003446983&hash=item1d00bbf279:g :dUoAAOSwuuFgIqY-
have you used it personally? and how often? How long does one package last?
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Old 05-11-2021, 01:00 PM
  #13  
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almost always Ive been doing this with bullets I used to reload,
a package of moly obviously will last longer if you reload less ammo
, but at least several thousand 30- cal or smaller projectiles can be marginally coated, before reloading...
its not a CURE , for bore copper fouling, but it does help reduce copper bore fouling.
clean your rifle bore well before use, and after use, and use the moly,
youll notice the bore tends to stay a noticeable bit less fouled
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Old 05-11-2021, 02:03 PM
  #14  
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I haven't found any difference in fouling between a copper jacketed or all copper bullet and I shoot both. But every new rifle I own had its barrel broken in using the shoot/clean/shoot/clean method. And every rifle I purchased used I lapped the barrel with J-B compound and also cleaned it good with a mild copper solvent like Hoppe's Elite. This can be a tedious process but pays off for the life of the barrel. And granted I've never shot a rifle enough to burn out a barrel like some guys have on here. Especially those who shoot competitively.
There are a lot of guys even in here that don't believe in breaking in a barrel. Well all I can say to that is "its your money". I've found that a properly broken in barrel will not foul near as much as one the wasn't broken in. I will also say the not all barrels need to be broken in. Most premium custom barrels have their bores lapped to a mirror finish which reduces the micro burrs that catch and hold the metal off the bullet.
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Old 05-12-2021, 07:53 AM
  #15  
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Id concur that careful cleaning of the rifles bore , with careful cleaning with solvent and patches and barrel prep,
like use of fine abrasive copper fouling removal before and recurring frequently (at about every 5 shots , during the initial barrel break-in, )
on a rather frequent repetitive basis, during the first few shots can provide noticeably better barrel life and in many cases improves accuracy
careful cleaning with copper/powder solvent , a jag of the proper matching bore size , and a patch soaked in moly spray, before you shoot and after about every 5 shots during the initial trip to sight in the rifle helps accuracy in many cases




https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/00155416

https://www.eabco.com/bore-paste.htm

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Old 05-16-2021, 03:35 PM
  #16  
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No I do not think mono or copper bullets are better than the run of the mill factory ammo for most deer hunting.
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Old 05-19-2021, 05:48 PM
  #17  
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Based on my admittedly limited experience, I've found that while copper bullets certainly kill whatever you hit with them, they don't do it quite as quickly as lead core bullets of similar weight. Quick disclaimer: I hunt almost exclusively with handguns, but I have used plenty of rifles and rifle cartridge-chambered T/C Encores to take down deer. The bullet type that drops deer the quickest (barring a spinal shot, of course) is a broadside hit in the lower chest cavity with a medium weight polymer-tipped bullet at moderate to high velocity. A 150 grain SST out of a 300 Weatherby, a 130 grain Nosler Ballistic Tip out of a 270 Winchester, and a 155 grain A-Max out of a 300 Win Mag Encore pistol, all broadside shots, had the exact same effect: that deer dropping in its tracks. That's not to say they all did, but several did, and the ones that didn't drop didn't go too far. Copper bullets, specifically the 150 grain TTSX I tried in the 300 Encore? The only one that dropped in its tracks was a spine shot. I don't think the spitzer shape lends itself well to rapid expansion that is needed for a quick kill, but the trade-off is deeper penetration than you would achieve with a same-weight lead core bullet. On that note, if you want to try out a lead-free bullet, you might consider using variants at the lighter end of the weight range for your cartridge.

On the handgun side of things, I have some experience using vastly different copper bullets with some interesting results. My primary hunting handguns have been 460 S&Ws - a Performance Center Model 460, and a T/C Encore. Using the Model 460, I used a handloaded 200 grain Barnes XPB - the spitzer version designed for the 460 - pushed along at 2,500 fps to take a coyote and a whitetail doe at 40 and 100 yards, respectively. You'd expect those big 45 caliber bullets to have knocked them to the ground, but the reality was both ran off with little indication they were even hit. The coyote ran about 60 to 70 yards before falling over, and the doe made it to the trees well over 100 yards away before going down.

However, contrary to my previous experience, this past season gave me some interesting insight. The first buck I killed, a massive 9 point during muzzleloader season, was unfortunately not dead when I approached him. I quickly drew and fired my CVA Optima pistol, hitting him with a standard 45 Colt designed 200 grain Barnes XPB at 1550 fps and killing him. Then, less than a week later, my 460 Encore dropped another buck in his tracks with a 200 grain Monoflex - another bluntly shaped pistol bullet - from the Hornady Handgun Hunter factory ammo line.

TL;DR: No, I do not think spitzer copper bullets are better for deer hunting. However, traditionally shaped copper pistol bullets definitely are.
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Old 09-27-2021, 11:38 PM
  #18  
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Mono-metal bullets can penetrate 15 percent deeper than bonded bullets and as much as 30 percent deeper than conventional jacketed bullets. And for some big-game hunting, deeper penetration is vital. Not so much for deer-size game, but when it comes to a raking shot on elk or moose, it becomes most important
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Old 10-04-2021, 04:20 PM
  #19  
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I couldn't tell you right now if they are any better. I have always shot either Noslers or Woodleighs in my handloads but last Dec my wife got me a 308 Win for Christmas. I had never shot much 30 caliber since I was a 7mm Mag guy. I like to load my own ammo and components were hard to find so I used what I could scrounge up. I got a couple of boxes on Barnes 130 gr TTSX and was surprised how well they shot.


In 2 weeks I head to CO for black bear and then will chase whitetails here in TX and I am using the 308. Hopefully I can report if they are any better or not.
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Old 10-09-2021, 07:17 AM
  #20  
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Standard cup and core bullets like core lokts, power points, etc. will get you a deer that's no less dead and without any serious fuss so long as you make a good shot.
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