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Tough Chewy Meat??

Old 11-04-2016, 01:17 PM
  #1  
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Default Tough Chewy Meat??

Last year my dad and i hunted all season without seeing a single deer, when finaly on the last day he saw a 2 year old spike and without hesitation took a great lung shot with his 30 30 and it only ran 40 yards before keeling over. so then i gutted it and we brought it back and had it all quartered up within an hour after he pulled the trigger. then when we went to eat some it was very tough and chewy and we cant find out why. We did everything we always do other than quartering it up so fast. Is that a thing? or why else would it be tough
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Old 11-04-2016, 01:29 PM
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Why do you think it was 2 years old? The most common reason that venison is chewy on the table is that it is over cooked. I always have my deer hunt in a walk in fridge for at least 7 days before I have it butchered, that helps tenderize it and improves the flavor but a 2 year old deer should not be tough unless it was over cooked.

Last edited by Oldtimr; 11-04-2016 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:04 PM
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Living in Vt I am fortunate to have normally good "hanging weather". I try to hang my deer for 5 to 7 days if the temps are suitable. I have never butchered a deer in less than 4 days and they are always tender. Over cooking is the quickest way to ruin a great vennie steak. I like them on the grill but a fail safe way to cook is to start with well trimmed back strap steaks cut 1/2 inch thick. Heat a well seasoned cast iron skillet on high heat and drop the steaks into it. Cook for a couple of minutes and when the blood and juices come up to the up side flip over, turn the heat off and pour in a 1/2 cup of white wine and cover. The steak will finish up in a few minutes and be ready to eat. Works every time and is medium rare and delicious.
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:06 PM
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dschaefeer1996, certain cuts are tougher, like a sirloin is tougher then a ribeye in a beef, it's the same in venison. Cooking to fast can make meat tough also. I put tougher venison cuts in the crock-pot. However every young buck, (1 1/2 yr old) i have got is what i would call tender?
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:10 PM
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I rarely hang my venison to tenderize, it does work though as the enzimes break down the connective tissue as it's hanging.
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:10 PM
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Because whoever cooked it didn't cook it right this time. Left it cook to long
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:23 PM
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Another little known trick to cooking ANY meat, don't put a "cold" steak on a hot surface. Like right out of the fridge cold. Let it sit out for around half an hour to come to around room temp. You will notice the difference doing this with about any cut of meat. And as far as most all venison steak cuts, hot and fast will yield the best results. Low and slow works well for roasts and such but a steak cut needs a lot of heat quick on both sides then let it rest for a few minutes after cooking to reabsorb the juices while it relaxes.
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Old 11-04-2016, 02:44 PM
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Yep, I always bring a steak to room temperature before I cook it. However, I disagree on the comment on cooking too fast can make meat tough. I grill my steaks at the highest temp my grill will get to, then flip them over and give them about three or four minutes and then remove from the heat and put them on a plate covered with foil to rest for 8 to 10 minutes. Now I have my steaks cut to one inch thick. For venison or beef or any other steak, high heat for a short time is what makes a good steak!
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Old 11-04-2016, 03:00 PM
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Oldtimr that depends on the cut, you need to cook a tougher cut low & slow, like neck/ brisket meat.
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Old 11-04-2016, 03:04 PM
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Also when i slow cook a roast like a Sirloin i do it low and slow and let it sit after cooking for 15 min or so, i can't explain why but it gets juicier. And like was said don't overcook venison.
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