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Trying to figure out how to do my first hunt

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Trying to figure out how to do my first hunt

Old 12-23-2012, 11:23 AM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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Default Trying to figure out how to do my first hunt

I am 28 years old and have never hunted grew up in a family that does not hunt. None of my friends hunt i looked up prices for rifle hunting lodges and it is like a grand. Is it worth paying that much or is there anyother ideas out there. I would like to go hunting next year this year i am working on my shooting and technique (spelling?), figureing out the process for after the hunt. Thanks for your input i am a completly hunting stupid so any advice would be great. I have been reading magazines and watching hunting shows.
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:29 AM
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Originally Posted by navymancdf View Post
I am 28 years old and have never hunted grew up in a family that does not hunt. None of my friends hunt i looked up prices for rifle hunting lodges and it is like a grand. Is it worth paying that much or is there anyother ideas out there. I would like to go hunting next year this year i am working on my shooting and technique (spelling?), figureing out the process for after the hunt. Thanks for your input i am a completly hunting stupid so any advice would be great. I have been reading magazines and watching hunting shows.
No worries.

I was in your situation and actually took up hunting very late. If you grow up in a city, in a non-hunting family, your opportunities are very limited (mine were). It really is a sport where it helps a lot to have someone introduce you to it. In my case it was my father-in-law.

You can get all your questions answered, but things are a lot easier if you have a friend you can tag along with. You'll make one pretty quickly as you get into the sport. I have several new friends now since taking it up.

Is your intent to hunt with a rifle, bow, or shotgun (slugs)?
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:43 AM
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Rifle for next year and then rifle and bow the next season. I got into wanting to hunt while i was Stationed in Nevada it is a very outdoorsman state did my hunter safety course then it seemed i was injured for the first season and i left unexpectidley prior to this season starting. Back there i had friend that were avid hunters.
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by navymancdf View Post
Rifle for next year and then rifle and bow the next season. I got into wanting to hunt while i was Stationed in Nevada it is a very outdoorsman state did my hunter safety course then it seemed i was injured for the first season and i left unexpectidley prior to this season starting. Back there i had friend that were avid hunters.
What state do you intend to hunt for next season? The advice you get will vary somewhat according to the region, climate, and topography. Maryland, I take it?
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:53 AM
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Yeah maryland Frederick county
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Old 12-23-2012, 12:01 PM
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I don't know how to advise you on finding land, but I assume there are public land opportunities there. Here is my general advice for whitetail bucks, and I have no doubt there are people better than me on here who will chime in:

1. Find what they eating, which is where they will be overnight generally.
2. Find where they are bedding (usually thickest part of woods), which is where they head early in the morning. Deer, especially in high pressure/population areas, tend to stay down by day in bedding.
3. Use google earth and then on-foot scouting to find ambush points between food and bedding sources.
4. The ideal ambush point is a funnel. There are many examples, but basically it is a narrow piece of land that provides cover for them traveling to and from bedding/food. Because it is narrow, it "funnels" them through a restricted area where you know they'll be and can intercept them. A classic example would be a narrow strip of trees running through fields and connecting two sections of thicker forest. There are endless examples, but funnels simply help narrow your choices for ambush points. Deer take the path of least resistance that still provides them cover...
5. Don't feel like you have to have a tree stand. I think natural ground blinds are very effective too. I prefer them and they are cheap.
6. Deer use vision and hearing obviously to look out for predators, but smell is probably the most important factor. Use scent-free detergents, etc and scent free soaps on yourself to reduce your scents as much as possible. Beyond that, play the wind. You never want the wind to your back because essentially it is blowing your scent in the direction you are hoping deer will come from.
7. Don't overhunt spots, as deer will figure you out and avoid that area.
8. Be patient, and arrive earlier in the morning than you think you need to so you are position as they return from feeding.

Anyone else?

Last edited by Clevinger; 12-23-2012 at 12:06 PM.
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Old 12-23-2012, 02:02 PM
  #7  
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One of the first things you might want to consider is where you plan to hunt before choosing a weapon. You may already know this but I thought that I'd throw it out there. Hunting with a rifle you'll need to be able to have some open areas or at least some good long shooting lanes. If your in brush I'd suggest a shot gun. With bow hunting you'll definetly have to have good shooting lanes. There's alot more to bow hunting so I'd suggest going to a good pro shop and let them set you up. It's a great sport and I'm sure you'll find a couple of friends to show you the ropes. Oh and don't exspect it to happen like it does on the TV shows lol. Good luck to you and be safe.
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:32 PM
  #8  
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Join a hunt club. They usually purchase land/hunting leases.

I belonged to The P/G/County Rod & Gun Club. They had hunt leases in Port Tobacco and a few other places.

Worth the investment in my opinion.
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Old 12-23-2012, 05:56 PM
  #9  
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It will change as you evolve,but maybe during the off season research could turn up public and private lands for next year. Having time to learn the "field"and what animals are there could lead to a home court advantage. Game movement and location likely to change before open season rolls around but scouting beforehand will update you. Having multiple spots will help for unexpected hunting pressure or crowding from other hunters. Small game hunting a good way to know whats going on in an area regarding food sources and learning nooks and crannies. Access routes ect.
Be safe and have fun!.
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Old 12-23-2012, 07:39 PM
  #10  
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I am with Monoped. Learn the area. I was talking to a younger guy in West Virginia this year and it was my last day hunting there. I told him a good area that year and he said he does not leave the main trails. He was afraid he would get lost. I don't advise getting lost, but that guy will never get a deer there. I see a lot of that on state land in Pa. I used to hunt Maryland for years and saw it there to. Learn to get around with a compass (I don't trust those new fangled things) and the hunting will get a lot better for you.
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