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Logistical advice for a hunter new to climbing treestands?

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Logistical advice for a hunter new to climbing treestands?

Old 11-04-2011, 09:27 AM
  #11  
Spike
 
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I used a climber once...put tree steps in and left it up there. Those things are too loud for my liking. I would still hunt before I used a climber. I have 7 hang ons and 3 ladder stands and that is all I need for the properties I hunt. If you do a good job scouting you won't need to move the stand.

For the price of a climbing stand I can put up 4 hang ons....

Last edited by chas0218; 11-04-2011 at 09:29 AM.
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Old 11-04-2011, 02:47 PM
  #12  
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I tie my bow to the bottom part of the stand that way I avoid bringing any extra rope. Same with a gun, just go slow and steady so it doesn't swing. The extra weight helps anchor the step as you move up. This may not be a good idea for an amateur though. I wear a fanny pack and hook it to the tree above me and take out anything important and put in pockets. Grunt, bullets, release, etc. This gets all the stuff out of your way. Hunting a stand usually implies limited shot range. For this reason I say skip the bow holder and lay it in your lap that way you can grab it and stand up fast with minimal movement. I take my quiver off and use the fanny pack to attach to the tree. Always bring a folding saw in case you want to switch trees on the fly or make new lanes. Dont forget a half empty bottle of water. If you gotta pee pour it out and fill it up. Scent management is critical when hunting a stand, always play the wind especially with a bow. Don't leave your stand anywhere where a cat can pee on it, that ruined several hunts for me last year until I baking soda soaked and washed it 3 times. Don't leave it hanging in the woods, squirrels rats coons will chew the straps and seats making it unsafe. It will also get wet.

This may just be me but I like to climb up the opposite side of the tree to where I think the deer will approach. This allows you to hide behind the tree when you stand up and draw your bow. It is harder but much more concealed. Experiment with it.

Most important thing to realize is basic physics, I say basic but to some people it is not so basic. Don't put all your weight on the edges or close to the tree. Best way to stand is on the end of the platform to apply most leverage gripping the tree. When I climb to full height, while gripping top platform I will jump and wiggle side to side causing the teeth to dig into the tree and seat it real well. This makes it MUCH safer. The more time you spend practicing where to stand and how to seat it into the tree at low heights the safer you will feel when standing awkwardly and taking that shot.

Good luck... -Jeff
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Old 11-04-2011, 09:14 PM
  #13  
Typical Buck
 
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Great thread.

Ive hunted for some time & until I bought a climber, I had limited luck. With a climber, I feel I have an advantage rather than luck.

Treestand comfort is sort of an oxymoron. Who's comfortable 20-40' up a tree on a 30" platform & a suspension seat?
But like everyone else, I try to make it as comfortable as possible.

I use a Summit Dagger. Its the same as the Viper without the safety bar in the front. (open-faced)
I bought the saddle bags that Summit sells which alleviate needing a fanny pack or any other pack. All my gear fits & is attached to the stand.

I usually drape my jacket & my cap to the climber while hiking so I dont overheat & use a tree spike to hang it if needed once in the tree.

I also use a 40' retractable tow line. I use a velcro strap to secure it to the upper section while climbing. I also use it to drag an estrous rag while hiking in & out.
Also, when my tow line runs out, I know Ive gone high enough.

I also use a screw in bow holder. A great investment for any treestand hunter.

I bought some Binoculars Suspenders too. Another great investment.

Treestand comfort to me is knowing my gear is secure & isnt going to fall to the ground. Accidents happen & gear is expensive.

I also sharpened the teeth on my climber with a grinding wheel. It bites into the tree, even the iffy ones & adds a little comfort when 40' off the ground.
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:49 AM
  #14  
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I had my first experience with my Viper this past Saturday. It was so windy that I probably should have still hunted instead of sitting in the stand, but at least I got some experience in. I learned that I hung my pack up too high and it blocked my “rear left view”, which cost me a doe that I should have had. I stayed in the stand all day (dark to dark), and probably stood for about 4 or 5 20-minute sessions. I could not believe how comfortable the Viper is. You’re talking to a guy that can’t sit still in a movie theater for more than 10 minutes without getting shifty. Pretty amazing.

The thing I am trying to figure out is “in and out logistics.” I set up my stand the night before, then rode my bike in the next morning with my gun and my pack on my back (it’s about a mile and a half into this spot). When I was done hunting and packed up the climber and my pack and gun together, I could not handle the way the climber distributed the weight across my upper back/lower neck (painful and would have probably caused some neck/back issues had I gone the whole way back like that). Once I got my gear back to the path, I dumped the stand and just road my bike back to the car to drop off my gun and pack, the rode back to pick up the stand. That was a royal PITA.

I have to say that I can’t imagine “sneaking” through the woods under cover of darkness with that stand on my back, and being able to “quietly” unpack and set it up. I feel like I climbed pretty quietly, but again, it was all set up from the night before. So, I kinda have mixed feelings about it. I really did like being up there and being able to see so far out. That is one heck of an advantage.
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Old 11-11-2011, 10:27 AM
  #15  
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Originally Posted by chas0218 View Post
I used a climber once...put tree steps in and left it up there. Those things are too loud for my liking. I would still hunt before I used a climber. I have 7 hang ons and 3 ladder stands and that is all I need for the properties I hunt. If you do a good job scouting you won't need to move the stand.

For the price of a climbing stand I can put up 4 hang ons....
I agree re: using them on private property. On public land, a climber is a must. A hang is waiting to be stolen, if they're even legal to leave there (laws vary).

I have to say that I can’t imagine “sneaking” through the woods under cover of darkness with that stand on my back, and being able to “quietly” unpack and set it up. I feel like I climbed pretty quietly, but again, it was all set up from the night before. So, I kinda have mixed feelings about it. I really did like being up there and being able to see so far out. That is one heck of an advantage.
Two answers to this:

One is practice. As you gain experience, you'll be able to set up and climb more quietly. Just takes several climbs to figure everything out.

Second is the actual stand. Some stands are simply quieter than others. I used to use an Ol' Man. PITA to set up and climb quietly and was really heavy on long hikes in, but it felt like a Lazy Boy once I was set up. In contrast, my new stand is a Lone Wolf. Fricking silent and light. I can probably get up my tree as quietly as someone in a hang-on. Seriously, huge difference between this and the ol' Man. And being light, I could go 1.5 miles and barely notice the weight. The only downside is comfort. I couldn't use it on an all-day hunt without taking a break. But there are no perfect solutions when bow hunting IMO, just tradeoffs.

Last edited by UPHunter08; 11-11-2011 at 10:35 AM.
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