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Which one is better?

Old 09-19-2011, 01:40 PM
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Default Which one is better?

Is a tree stand better when hunting white tail or is a ground blind better?
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Old 09-19-2011, 03:09 PM
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I think in general, treestands are more effective if you have a choice. You have an advantage because it's more difficult to detect movement and scent from above. Many, however are taken every year out of ground blinds.
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Old 09-19-2011, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Wingbone View Post
I think in general, treestands are more effective if you have a choice. You have an advantage because it's more difficult to detect movement and scent from above. Many, however are taken every year out of ground blinds.
ok thanks for the input
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Old 09-19-2011, 03:40 PM
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It boils down to personal preferance. I like to use ground blinds if I can take the time to construct one instead of using a prebought setup, which isn't always possible.

If there is enough cover I don't mind a tree stand. A few years ago I sat in a tripod setup and felt like I was an orange cone sitting several feet up in the air. The timber was light enough that I might have gotten a shot out to 100 yrds. So in the future I will use tree stands for elevated positions.
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Old 09-19-2011, 10:56 PM
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Tree stands can move and sway with the wind. Ground blinds are solid. I don't like swaying with the wind. If you don't mind heights the tree stand will always be better (if they are over 15-20 feet) but I've found ground blinds can work well also if the "shooting windows" aren't so large as to show your silouette (spelling?).
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:48 AM
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Both can be effective in the right terrain and placement! I've shot deer out of both, though I prefer the tree stand for two very simple reasons; 1. A blind limits sight, with a tree stand you have a much bigger picture of the woods and your potential targets. 2. A blind limits hearing ability, sometimes you hear deer before you see them; a tree stand allows you absolute hearing ability.
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Old 09-20-2011, 09:50 AM
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As a deer researcher and outfitter/guide since 1989 I'll say this.

Generaly speaking a tree stand is best for whitetails because;

1. they can keep you out of the normal range of vision of the deer.

2. they can keep your scent from the deer.

3. you can generally see much better when you are elevated.

God bless,

T.R.
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Old 09-20-2011, 11:37 AM
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I received an e-mail this morning, asking when and where to set up in relation to buck beds. Here is my answer.

Q: I've got your book, and I've found buck beds on a ridge, what time of day do bucks leave their beds and where should I set up to hunt them?

A: It is coincidental you asked me this question, because I was just thinking about how many hunters do not understand deer biology and behavior, especially that of bucks, and how to read and interpret deer sign, so that they can figure out what the deer was doing when it left that sign. If you understand deer biology and behavior, and know how to read and interpret deer sign, and if you see enough of it - spread-out over the area that you hunt - you can put all of the clues together and figure out what time of day the deer was in particular locations, whether it was a buck or a doe, whether it was mature or not, sometimes the relative age of a buck, sometimes the relative rack size of a buck, which way the deer was going, and where it is most likely to travel, feed and bed.

There are two major things about deer behavior that hunters should always think about: 1. Several different studies show that during the fall (when the leaves are either falling or have fallen, food sources are changing and when the breeding season occurs) a deer rarely travels more than 2.5 miles during a 24 hours period. The majority of that movement will be within two hours of both sunset and sunrise, with most of the movement occurring from 4 in the evening until 10 in the morning. 2. White-tailed deer generally have what is referred to as an"annual home range" within which they spend the majority of their life. Within the annual home range they may as many as four "seasonal home ranges", depending on where the food sources are and on the thermal bedding needs of the deer at that time of year. These home ranges are generally 2-3 times longer than they are wide, and from 1.5-2 miles I n length.

What this means to the hunters is that; when you see a deer between one and two hours before sunset you are probably not more than one-half mile from its core area, and when you see a deer within one hour of sunset, you are probably not more than a mile from its core area. And if you know which direction from which the deer came, you know which direction the core area probably is. If you see a deer within an hour of sunrise, it is probably headed to the core are and it is probably not more than a mile from the core area.


So – for your question

If you have my book you should realize that deer get up from their core areas (where you are finding buck beds) in the evening to go out and feed during the 1-2 hours before and after sunset.

First off realize that a buck can and may bed anywhere within its core area, which could be up to 500 acres in size, but generally smaller. And they will bed in different areas each day, depending on what the weather is doing. If the wind comes from the southeast, then they will be on the northwest, but if normal winds come from the north or Northwest, they will bed on south or southeast sides. If it is sunny and warm they often bed in areas that offer shade or wind or cooling near water. But, if it is sunny and cold, they will bed in areas out of the wind, out of the shade and in the sun.

What you need to do is try to figure out how big of an area the buck uses as a core area, but at least figure out what trail or trails it uses as it leaves the core areas to come out and feed at night. Sooner or later all f the trails out of a core area join in to one trail, where you will find rubs on 1-2 inch trees. Once you find the probably start of the rub route, figure out where the buck travels that route the first time in the afternoon, and set up along it, where you will have the best chance of seeing it during the evening. From late August to mid August is the time when bucks begin to semi-regularly on their summer home ranges.

In some areas (often in limited good habitat, or vast areas of one type of habitat- as in primarily agricultural fields, or primarily big woods) deer may k use separate fall home ranges. If it uses separate summer and fall home ranges (the fall home range is usually its primary breeding range), it may move (as much as several miles) to a new daytime core area, where it (if it is over 3 years of age) will have preferred bedding areas, and a new travel route. If you no longer see the buck in one area, and rub and scrape activity falls off or stops altogether, either the buck is dead, or it has moved to a fall home range, or a new area. If this happens you should look for fresh rubs and scrapes, in a different area, to locate a rub route / trail of the bucks in that area, and backtrack the rub routes to the buck core areas.

A buck will generally use a different rub route / trail to go back to it daytime core area in the evening, along which you may find rubs on 1-2 inch trees, as it leads back to its daytime core area (generally a wooded area). It may use part of the same rub route trail it uses in the evening once it gets close to its core are, or it may use a completely different route/trail into the core area. Once it get into the core area, the trail may split into several different very lightly used trails, because the buck chooses bedding sites on different days based on the weather conditions that day. You can also setup along an evening rub route, choosing a location along a rub route, either before it splits up into several different trails, and/always (if you can – the core area may not be on the property you hunt) where the deer will travel during legal daylight hunting hours.

No matter where you hunt, you need to get to your hunting location at least 1 hour before you expect the buck to get there - to let the area settle down (other animals reactions), and let any unnatural scents dissipate. I like to get there ate lest 2 hours ahead of time, just in case some deer got anxious and moved early.
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Old 09-20-2011, 01:00 PM
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I use both, typically dictated by the terrain I'm setting up in. If I have a good spot without any trees suitable for a treestand, I clear out an area and use a portable blind or build one from the brush in that area. Either can be very effective when used right.
-Jake
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Old 09-20-2011, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by trmichels View Post
As a deer researcher and outfitter/guide since 1989 I'll say this.

Generaly speaking a tree stand is best for whitetails because;

1. they can keep you out of the normal range of vision of the deer.

2. they can keep your scent from the deer.

3. you can generally see much better when you are elevated.

God bless,

T.R.

As for #2, I believe a blind to be a better scent controller than a tree stand if done properly. Yes, in a tree stand the wind would blow your scent "over" the animal, but in a blind if scent control is practiced religiously it would help prevent the scent from leaving the blind.
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