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Can I hunt on this land???

Old 04-13-2010, 08:16 AM
  #11  
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[QUOTE=Lanse couche couche;3612015]Its a wonder that the hospitals, morgues and coroners can handle all those bodies pouring in, given the number of folks who claim to shoot tresspassers on sight

thats why god invented shovels, backhoes, and deep ass swamps
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Old 04-13-2010, 08:41 AM
  #12  
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Yeah, that's why you have all these pictures of missing people on milk cartoons with the caption reading "last seen crossing a fence onto posted ground."
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Old 04-13-2010, 09:39 AM
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Here in GA where I live the funny thing is if property is not posted youll rarely see much outside traffic. But as soon as you hammer on those posted signs ppl come in and try and hunt. Now why is that? Maybe theres not that many new tresspassers its just that after you post your land your more vigilant to outsiders? Either way I dont post our land, you still gotta have written permission anyway.
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Old 04-13-2010, 10:13 AM
  #14  
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Probably because if it is posted, folks think that there must be stuff of value there to protect and they want to get in there and take a look.

Its like the people who try to give away an old couch by putting it in the yard with a "free" sign on it. Nobody touches it. But just hang a "for sale" sign on it and folks will come sneaking up in the middle of the nite looking to steal it.
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Old 04-13-2010, 11:50 AM
  #15  
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Short answer is different states have different rules regarding private land that is not posted. Here in VA, you need verbal permission. In Maine, apparently you can trespass and hunt private land that is not posted.

Know the law in your state. Do a Google search for "GIS [your county] maps" and you might find a site that will help you locate/contact the owner.
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Old 04-16-2010, 07:57 AM
  #16  
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I second the "GIS maps" advice. If availible, it can provide a lot of valuable information.

In MA, the game belongs to the "people", not the landowner. This allows hunters/trappers to enter private land that isn't posted with owners name to hunt, if set back regulations are followed.

If a landowner doesn't wish to allow public hunting on their land, the need to post it with sign including their name.

There is verbage that protects landowners from hunters/trappers that become injured or killed.

Some cities and town have by-laws that require landowner permission.

I have woild have no problem with someone hunting within the rules, even on the land of another.
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Old 04-16-2010, 09:16 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by hubby11 View Post
Short answer is different states have different rules regarding private land that is not posted. Here in VA, you need verbal permission. In Maine, apparently you can trespass and hunt private land that is not posted.
In NH like Maine, if property is not posted you can legally hunt it.
It has nothing to do with trespassing, which is a crime.

From the NH Fish and Game website.
Common law in New Hampshire gives the public the right of access to land that's not posted. You won't find that in state law books, because it is common law, going back to the philosophy of New England's early colonists and supported over the centuries by case law. Our forefathers knew the importance of balancing the need for landowners' rights with that of the public good. On one hand, the landowner can make decisions about his or her land. On the other hand, the public should have limited rights to use and enjoy that land. The colonists held similar democratic notions about rivers, lakes, fish and wildlife.

Today, it's easy to take this notion for granted. In New Hampshire and elsewhere in New England, we enjoy a long, proud tradition of public use of private land.
This tradition also comes with a risk. A landowner who finds trash, disrespect or other problems can easily decide to post his or her land.
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Old 04-16-2010, 09:39 AM
  #18  
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I think that general philosophy can be found elsewhere, at least until fairly recently. When i was growing up in southeastern Illinois, there was an unspoken rule that if you did not want other people on your land you would post it. Otherwise, the implication was that you did not care if others wandered on it in the course of hunting game, fishing, or hunting mushrooms. That changed since many people started buying land specifically to hunt on, lease, outfit, etc. and so now have a vested interest to protect.
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Old 04-16-2010, 09:53 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by Jimmy S View Post
In NH like Maine, if property is not posted you can legally hunt it.
It has nothing to do with trespassing, which is a crime.

From the NH Fish and Game website.
Common law in New Hampshire gives the public the right of access to land that's not posted. You won't find that in state law books, because it is common law, going back to the philosophy of New England's early colonists and supported over the centuries by case law. Our forefathers knew the importance of balancing the need for landowners' rights with that of the public good. On one hand, the landowner can make decisions about his or her land. On the other hand, the public should have limited rights to use and enjoy that land. The colonists held similar democratic notions about rivers, lakes, fish and wildlife.

Today, it's easy to take this notion for granted. In New Hampshire and elsewhere in New England, we enjoy a long, proud tradition of public use of private land.
This tradition also comes with a risk. A landowner who finds trash, disrespect or other problems can easily decide to post his or her land.
Its a good thing then that my forefathers came up with a little thing called the Bill of Rights!! Which includes The Right of Quiet Enjoyment. I also think that your forefathers intentions were to ensure that people had access to things like water etc. and not for recreational hunting.

Being born & rasied in York PA. which was the First Capital of the United States of America, Im glad that here in the commonwealth of PA. (which we have a rich tradition aswell) only recognize forefathers who were or became citizens of the United States of America and not your forefathers who were loyal subjects to the crown of England.
And here in PA. posted or not, its called trespassing. Pike

Last edited by J Pike; 04-16-2010 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 04-16-2010, 01:20 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by J Pike View Post
....And here in PA. posted or not, its called trespassing. Pike
I am glad I don't live in PA!
In NH we have the right to hunt unposted land. It is never considered tresspassing. Any land owner certainly has the right to post their land. All hunters with any sense of decency, including myself and my family and friends, respect that right. It is simply a long time tradition that most/all New England states share.

NH also has severe criminal trespassing laws during hunting season. The NH Fish and Game will always be involved if you violate any landowner that posts his or her land during hunting season. We understand what it means when hunting peoperty is unposted and we also understand the respect that should be give to posted land as well as the consequences if you violate landowners rights.
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