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WOLVES

Old 01-04-2005, 08:31 PM
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USF&W announced today that in Idaho and Montana wolves can be shot if attacking livestock and pets. I am sure they are allowing this to punish Wyoming for not doing as they say. Wyoming is just starting court procedings with the lawsuit they filed against the USF&W for not accepting Wyomings management plan. Wyoming bowed thier neck and stood up against the feds and I am proud of Wyomings stance on the very emotional and controversial issue.[>:]
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Old 01-04-2005, 09:04 PM
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Here in MT the wordans have killed many wolves all ready. I think they should let people hunt them not fly around and just ahoot them. The big think here in MT now is to fly around and shoot every coyote they see NEVER picking them up. This to me is a big wast it should go onder the wast not want not law.


LET there be wolf hunts
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Old 01-07-2005, 12:53 PM
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ORIGINAL: ELKINMTCWB

Here in MT the wordans have killed many wolves all ready. I think they should let people hunt them not fly around and just ahoot them. The big think here in MT now is to fly around and shoot every coyote they see NEVER picking them up. This to me is a big wast it should go onder the wast not want not law.


LET there be wolf hunts
what are you expecting someone to do with coyote/wolf kills? leaving them lay has been standard operating procedure for as long as i can remember.
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Old 01-07-2005, 02:36 PM
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We take them to the mink farm and feed them to the minks so nothing goes to waste
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Old 01-07-2005, 02:48 PM
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This is called the fur indrestry they use furs of all kinds for coats gloves hats and tons more items. bones are sold to crafty people they make all kinds of indain art.If it is cold where you live JROOT I bet you walk buy tons of coats with fur trim DOG fox and yote.

Allso there is a very high demand for the hides just to hang on the wall in people houses.

I will be glade to take EVERY wolf you shoot. In trade you could come hunt MT any time I would be glade to lead you to some elk :}
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Old 01-07-2005, 04:43 PM
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Thanks RandyL
Just found the site with the info. Hopefully hunting will follow soon in these area's where they have destroyed the Elk hunting.


New U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Regulation Allows Maximum Management of Gray Wolves for the States of Montana and Idaho

News Releases Home Page

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Contacts
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Sharon Rose (303) 236-4580


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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service unveiled a new regulation today that expands the authority of States and Native American Tribes with Service-approved wolf management plans to manage gray wolves in the Northern Rocky Mountains population.



The rule only applies to States and Tribes that have Service-approved wolf management plans. Only two States, Montana and Idaho, where there are about 550 wolves, presently fit that category. At this time, this regulation does not apply to the State of Wyoming because it does not have a Service-approved wolf management plan. The new rule takes effect in Montana and Idaho in 30 days.



"These changes provide a logical transition between management by the Federal government and management by the States and Tribes," said Ralph Morgenweck, Regional Director of the Service's Mountain-Prairie Region. "State and Tribal management under scientifically sound wolf management plans provides effective wolf conservation and will allow the States and Tribes to gain valuable management experience in anticipation of delisting."



Wolf populations now exceed their numerical recovery goals under the Endangered Species Act in the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. However, before delisting can be proposed, each of the three States must have a State management plan approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Montana and Idaho have approved wolf management plans and this rule ONLY applies in those States at this time.




"Unfortunately, at this time we are unable to continue with the process to delist this wolf population because we do not have approved plans for all three states. However, we believe that it is appropriate to pursue as much local management for this recovered wolf population as possible," Morgenweck said.



This rule recognizes the unique and special relationship between Federal and Tribal governments. This rule provides Tribes with all the same opportunities on reservation lands that it offers the States on lands under State wildlife management authority. Tribes with Service-approved wolf management plans can assume the lead for wolf management on their reservation lands through the same process that is available to the States. This rule also treats Tribal members' lands on reservations as private property within the borders of States with approved wolf plans, increasing wolf management flexibility to protect the private property of tribal members. In addition, Tribal members who are legally grazing their livestock on public lands may protect them from wolf attack.



Interest over the proposed rule, known as a 10(j) rule under the Endangered Species Act, for wolf management in the Northern Rockies stimulated more than 23,000 comments after it was published in March 2004. The final rule announced today is as a result of input and review of comments from the public, States, Federal agencies and Tribes.



Under the final 10j rule, landowners in States with a Service-approved wolf management plan are able to take additional steps to protect their livestock and dogs from attacks by wolves. States can lead wolf management, including the authority to issue written take authorizations to landowners or public land permittees to control wolves that consistently pose a threat to their livestock. On public lands, grazing permittees and guiding and outfitter permittees are allowed to take wolves attacking their livestock or domestic animals herding and guarding livestock without prior written authorization.



The changes only affect the experimental population areas established in Montana and Idaho when wolves were reintroduced in 1995 and1996. The new regulation does not apply to wolf populations in the Great Lakes region or in the southwestern United States.



Among other things, the regulation provides that in Montana and Idaho:



Wolves attacking livestock, livestock herding and guarding animals, and dogs on private land can be taken by landowners without prior written authorization.


Wolves attacking livestock and livestock herding and guarding animals on public grazing allotments can be taken by grazing permittees, guides and outfitters, and on ceded lands by Tribal members, without written authorization.


Wolves determined to be causing unacceptable impacts to wildlife populations, such as herds of deer and elk, can be taken by State or Tribal agencies. This is allowed only after the States or Tribes complete science-based documents that have undergone public and peer review and have been approved by the Service.


States or Tribes with approved wolf management plans can establish Memorandums of Agreement with the Secretary of the Interior, or cooperative agreements with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to lead gray wolf conservation and management in the experimental areas within their States or reservations boundaries.


Gray wolves were reintroduced in the Northern Rockies as nonessential experimental populations under the Endangered Species Act in 1995 and 1996. This designation allowed Federal, State and Tribal agencies and private citizens more flexibility in managing these populations while allowing for rapid recovery of the wolf population.



The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 95-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses 545 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also operates 69 national fish hatcheries, 64 fishery resources offices and 81 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign and Native American tribal governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

-fws-


nfo.
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Old 01-08-2005, 03:14 PM
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Here is a link to a story about wolves driving elk herds from feeding areas in WyomingWolves driving Elk from feeding Areas
Look out.... the Enviro-Whackos (and all thier money& NON science) Must be defeated on this one

That didn't work,did it?? Try going to www.outdoorsunlimited.net
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Old 01-08-2005, 05:29 PM
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I am just curious but since wolves and elk co-existed before we got here-what upsets the balance now when we introduce wolves? Before anybody goes off on me I am not an animal whacko-I hunt deer, elk, birds, waterfowl and coyotes-I am just curious as to why this is a problem.
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Old 01-08-2005, 06:12 PM
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DUCK what every one is woried about is the wolves doing the job of the hunters[ keeping the elk numbers down]. If this hapens the number of tags given out will go down very fast and stay down means NO elk hunting in some spots.I do not like the fact that ANY rancher can now kill any and all wolves after his cows. I think they should be hunted not vush shot and left to waist.

One of the bigest things with hunting is to not waist the game we have to hunt. I beleave the new law over wolves makes it so ranchers and guides can kill atmost any time they would like. NO tag nedded nor do they keep the animal.
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Old 01-08-2005, 07:28 PM
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DUCKSTAMPEDE, that is a good point. But the difference now as opposed to when wolves and wildlife coexisted with out problems are numerous. The wolves were introduced, not naturally occuring, no control of the wolves as yet. USF&W is waffleing on control. Very limited control in Montana and Idaho, if your livestock or pets are being attacked and thats it. Wyoming, no control because Wyoming submitted thier plan along with Id, and Mt. The Wy plan calls for all wolves out of Rockefeller Park and Yellowstone to be classified as preditors, in the Parks they are trophy game. We all know in the Parks they will never be hunted, no hunting is allowed in those parks. Basically out of the Park they are fair game, anything goes except, poison or aireal gunning. The USF&W did not like this so they denied WY delisting. The state of Wyoming, a group of hunters, two county commisions, and a livestock group, filed suit against the USF&W just recently to prove that the USF&W lied and denied Wy's plan on unsound scientific evidence. Right now it is a political ploy by the feds.

Don't let anyone BS you, the Canadian Grey wolf is doing fine and VERY well in Wy. No one can even agree on a total count. USF&W say 170 wolves in WY. G&F estimates over 500. Mike Jemenez, USF&W guru, stated to the news last week that the wolf population has leveld off in Wy, with a 6% growth rate. 6% is a pretty good growth rate, I wouldn't call that leveling off. Where as, the elk population is at less than 1% growth in the same area. There are so many reports around the state I have to agree with the G&F. I can tell you documented, published stories one after the other of wolf sighintgs around the state of Wy. The truth is big game is suffering, drought, loss of habitat, and preditors. Wolves and Grizzlys. A combination of all of the above has drasticly reduced elk numbers in some areas to pre 70 levels. Simple math, wolves eat elk, there are around 500. How much meat can 500 wolves eat? LOTS AND LOTS! What do you think? Conservatively! 20 elk a day? Times 365 days a year! Not to mention the ones that are stressed from harasment by being chased by wolves, only to wonder off and die or abort thier calves. This has also happend on almost every winter feed ground in WY. Read the above news article.

It is a very controversial and emotional situation. I am not against having wolves here, I just feel if they come out of Yellowstone then they are fair game. If a season was opend tomorrow and no restrictions, excluding poison and aireal gunning, you wuold not kill all the wolves in Wy. They will not be wiped out, or eradicated. How many people on this forum has spent time in wolf country and even seen a wolf?? I have hunted in 5 Canadian provinces a total of 7 times, a wolf tag in my pocket each time and I seen one wolf in all the trips I made. Here in Wy, I see tracks every time I go to where I elk hunt, I have seen wolves one time, they just stand there and watch you, no fear. And I am seeing fewer and fewer elk. As is most outfitters and hunters in Northwest Wy.
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