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Questions about resident hunting in NV

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Questions about resident hunting in NV

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Old 10-02-2019, 01:08 PM
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Spike
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Default Questions about resident hunting in NV

I'm new to this board. Nice to "meet" you. I'm a 41-year-old experienced hunter moving from Ohio to Las Vegas for work. I'll adapt in order to be able to continue to hunt. I hunt whitetail deer, turkeys, ducks, geese, squirrels, and I've hunted black bear and rabbits in the past. I hunt mostly in Pennsylvania, waterfowl in various East Coast states, and a few things at home in Ohio. I'm not looking for anybody's hunting spot, but am interested in asking about some key differences in hunting out east compared to Southern NV. I don't really expect to be able to draw tags this year, but let me know if there are any possibilities I might not be thinking of.

My expectations are that I'll be limited to coyotes and jackrabbits and doing a lot of scouting this season, due to the late start. Next season I should be a full-fledged resident, meeting the length of residency requirement. I'm expecting to need to get in shape, as hunting from the tree stands I'm used to is likely a bit less physically demanding than hunting in the desert mountains. I can't imagine there is a ton of waterfowl on Lake Mead and the Colorado River. Not sure how packed the hunting spots are for the fewer numbers of ducks and geese available.

My main questions are around how likely / unlikely it is to be drawn for big game tags. Assuming I'm in shape and capable of hunting the environment for each type, is it reasonably likely to be drawn if you put in for each big game species? I'd hate to pay the fees involved for all of the different types of big game without a reasonable chance of being drawn. Do hunters go years without being drawn? I've read a few articles on the topic, but I'm still not getting an idea of how likely it is.

Regarding jackrabbits in the desert, is this mostly done with spot and stalk, just waiting to ambush, or do you need dogs? Is it like hunting cottontails with beagles?

Anything else I'm not thinking of? Any information is appreciated.

Last edited by Friedl; 10-04-2019 at 05:45 PM.
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Old 10-05-2019, 01:50 PM
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I've hunted a lot of Jacks, seriously some of my most fun hunting. In the later morning they tend to react two ways, they take off too far away for a shot and disappear over a hill. The ones that bunker down and hide are the fun ones. I kick the brush piles and if there is one in there they explode out of there moving fast, then start zig-zagging. A side note, the same skill sets and quick shooting that make Jacks so much fun work well on Charlie and rag heads. The best place to hunt them is in the desert next to some low greenery. Young Alfalfa fields are a good place. Right next to the irrigated field and the unirrigated desert. I've also had good luck near golf courses
Dogs aren't going to do you much good unless they are trained to flush close. If they move too far off they just spook the Jacks before you get into shotgun range. I usually hunt them with multiple hunters and we walk in line abreast.

Most Desert Deer hunting is all about the water. I use good maps that note every spring and seep, USGA maps are good. Deer don't usually sleep near water, water is the most dangerous place. But at sunset water is often the first place they head.
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Old 10-06-2019, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by MudderChuck View Post
A side note, the same skill sets and quick shooting that make Jacks so much fun work well on Charlie and rag heads.
Thanks for the reply. What do you mean by those? Iím not familiar with those names.
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Old 10-07-2019, 12:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Friedl View Post

Thanks for the reply. What do you mean by those? I’m not familiar with those names.

It means if you ever find yourself in a combat situation the same skill sets you learn hunting Jacks may help you survive. Instinct shooting, when a Jack explodes out of a brush pile and starts zig-zagging, it is all instinct. You don't have time to aim.

Charlie is short for Victor Charlie, Viet Cong. Rag heads are those who wipe with their fingers and want you dead. Whatever you want to call them and no matter what their motivation, Patton said it best. "No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making some other poor dumb bastard die for his country."

An M-16 on three round burst, you instinct aim at their right hip (your left) and the rifle walks the shots diagonally across their torso, Jack hunting also teaches you to aim a little low, quick second shots are invariably higher than the first shot. Try it, if it doesn't work for you, you'll have to try something else, works for most.

Aiming is always the best, sometimes you don't have time to aim.

Jasks will often run in a straight line if they have some distance from you, their first instinct when close is to zig zag. They can hit zero to forty MPH pretty darned quick.
Jacks are actually good eating, not a lot of meat on one. Back straps are the best part of the Jack (Hare). Roasted with a lot of oil bast. I use Rape oil with Pepper and Herbs. Back legs are like drum sticks. but tough, better in a soup or Goulash. Just make sure you get the cooking temps up high, they are prone to parasites, you want to cook them hot enough to kill all the possible bad stuff.

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Old 10-08-2019, 07:49 AM
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Oh, all right, I knew those. In context, it seemed like hunting advice. Thanks for the hunting advice. It must be hard walking around with enough prejudice to introduce it unsolicited into a conversation about hunting.
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Old 10-08-2019, 04:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Friedl View Post
Oh, all right, I knew those. In context, it seemed like hunting advice. Thanks for the hunting advice. It must be hard walking around with enough prejudice to introduce it unsolicited into a conversation about hunting.
You call it prejudice I call it prudence. Hunting Jacks has saved my bacon on occasion, like I said it is a skill set that can have multiple uses.

Old soldiers instinctively try to teach young soldiers, so they can also become old soldiers. Sorry if you got butt hurt.
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Old 10-08-2019, 04:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Friedl View Post
Oh, all right, I knew those. In context, it seemed like hunting advice. Thanks for the hunting advice. It must be hard walking around with enough prejudice to introduce it unsolicited into a conversation about hunting.
It would be clear to anyone who was in the military what he was saying, sadly you just don't get it. Remember, you are the one who asked the question, some of us understood what he said!
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Old 10-08-2019, 09:45 PM
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Thanks, appreciate the advice.
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Old 10-09-2019, 03:24 PM
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This seemed like such an innocent comment...then leave it to the usual suspects......dang. Friedl I do not know anything regarding Nevada draws or areas, I am sure the fish and game dept. has stats for the different drawings, success. I have heard the northern area from Winemmucca to Elko is good country for mulies and elk. As for rabbits, I am not sure about the law in Nevada, but if allowed, spotlighting is a pretty good time. I would imagine coyotes are pretty thick, and most anywhere you go and try calling you would have some action.
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Old 10-09-2019, 06:09 PM
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If you find someplace thick with Jacks you are going to find Yotes and Rattlers.
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