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Manchurian Pheasants

Old 09-02-2020, 02:12 PM
  #21  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
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Originally Posted by Oldtimr View Post
Only one fool in this conversation and it is not me. Yes, I have know doubt that I know more than you do on the subject. 34 years working for the PGC is more Bona Fides than your thinking you know more than I do. Just keep deluding yourself . Now you bring deer into the picture, the subject is pheasants. Just shows how desperate you are to try to make your blathering right. It is not, it never will be. You may want to consider it was the know it all hunters who were responsible for lobbying the general assembly to prevent the PGC from cutting back the deer herd decades before a BOC had the guts to tell the General assembly where to go. No sense continuing this conversation and probably any conversation with you. You are hopeless. Feel free to have the last word, I know you will, but it will not make you correct in your assertions.
your the one with the ignorance, I have mention deer in this topic since my second post here?
Nothing new, and I mentioned it to show the lack of response by the PAGC

NEXT you like to call folks names, that's very BIG of you, very professional!

and since you accuse me of being wrong??
where is your proof I am Wrong and Not your opinion<


and I have 1 question for you, since you know SO much more than I do!

question being this, lets see how you answer it with your GREAT knowledge of the PA GC!

question is
IF Farmer stared using chemicals TOMORROW that KILLED EVERY DEER that ate any of there crops they plant
are you TELLING ME??
the PAGC has NO authority to step in and do anything about it??

OH and BY the way I mentioned too about the delay in offending hunters was a reason why it took so long for the PAGC to act on the deer
I already stated this in this [email protected]
so you again DON"T know what I know but you SURE think so, and yet your WRONG AGAIN< NOT me YOU!

Last edited by mrbb; 09-02-2020 at 02:16 PM.
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Old 01-10-2021, 09:10 PM
  #22  
Spike
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Join Date: Jun 2017
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Alright yall that got a little heated. I have heard and read about the Sichuan pheasant program. And while I do realize that it was not a success, habitat for pheasants at that time was quite frankly terrible. That was back when they thought simply putting more birds out would solve the problem. Another cool thing I found was that one of the release sites is exactly where our farm is now back when it was a dairy operation. I do believe that wild birds are better but when our valley was surveyed for a WPRA application, the PGC said that there were too many Amish farms that wouldn’t participate in the program, so wild birds are not obtainable. I’m simply trying to find as close of an alternative as I can. Much has changed in the area since the 80s when the Sichuan project took place, with quite literally over a thousand acres of idle grass set aside. Some of it is not high quality grass being goldenrod and some cool seasons like Timothy and orchard grass yes I understand but it beats “dirt and macadam” as OT said. A couple of the neighboring farms CREP contracts expired and are putting them into NWSGs so that’s a big step in the right direction. While as stated before with the wild birds not being obtainable, we have seen levels of success with our version of soft release with regular ringnecks, and I think that if we use even a slightly wilder bird, we might see a pocket of sustaining birds. As said before. We had two hens both rear successful broods this past summer so with extensive habitat management I think some form of success is reachable.
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Old 01-20-2021, 11:47 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by Mason Brubaker View Post
Alright yall that got a little heated. I have heard and read about the Sichuan pheasant program. And while I do realize that it was not a success, habitat for pheasants at that time was quite frankly terrible. That was back when they thought simply putting more birds out would solve the problem. Another cool thing I found was that one of the release sites is exactly where our farm is now back when it was a dairy operation. I do believe that wild birds are better but when our valley was surveyed for a WPRA application, the PGC said that there were too many Amish farms that wouldn’t participate in the program, so wild birds are not obtainable. I’m simply trying to find as close of an alternative as I can. Much has changed in the area since the 80s when the Sichuan project took place, with quite literally over a thousand acres of idle grass set aside. Some of it is not high quality grass being goldenrod and some cool seasons like Timothy and orchard grass yes I understand but it beats “dirt and macadam” as OT said. A couple of the neighboring farms CREP contracts expired and are putting them into NWSGs so that’s a big step in the right direction. While as stated before with the wild birds not being obtainable, we have seen levels of success with our version of soft release with regular ringnecks, and I think that if we use even a slightly wilder bird, we might see a pocket of sustaining birds. As said before. We had two hens both rear successful broods this past summer so with extensive habitat management I think some form of success is reachable.
IMO micro instead of macro has a higher chance of success. I had pockets of Pheasant success on a consolidated lease of 3000 hectares. I raised small clutches and set them out in ideal areas. IMO the only path to success is experimentation and see what works. Domesticated Ringnecks are doomed to fail to establish a breeding population. They are normally raised as huntable birds and replenished as needed. The same traits that make them ideal for domesticated raising pretty much make their long term survivability in the wild unlikely. My observations tell me survival traits are missing. Wild birds will beat themselves to death on the wire in a pen when they get spooked. Domesticated birds are more docile and less nervous.
I read a hybrid Ringneck is said to lose much of the domesticated traits and is likely to be a better survivor.
Wild hens need almost total quiet to breed in captivity. There was one local breeder that bred wild hens, he was successful.
I had one Ringneck nesting area that was typically three hens in close proximity and a single Cock. They had some strange habits. Early in the season, they would lay in a communal clutch/nest I called it a throwaway nest as none would brood the clutch. No idea why they'd do this. I\d sneak in at night and steal some of the eggs and transport them to an incubator. Some were viable. Pheasants lay way more eggs than you'd think.
I've said it before and will say it again if you want success you have to really thin out the local predator population. And Pheasant often need supplemental water. Ideal habitat may not help if it is too dry.
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