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Punch or Squeeze the trigger????????

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Punch or Squeeze the trigger????????

Old 10-01-2011, 03:10 PM
  #1  
Spike
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Default Punch or Squeeze the trigger????????

I am normally an average or a little above average shooter. This year I started out shooting terrible. A buddy recommended a T-handle release so I went to bps and shot several. Found 1 a liked, and shot it for about 3-4 weeks. I started flinched really bad so I went back to an old wrist strap, but could not get it adjusted so i went and got a new wrist strap. I shot the best I have shot all year today but i was punching the trigger on purpose. Can I be a good shot by punching the trigger or do I need to go back to trying to squeeze? I never could do the push with bow hand and pull with back thing!!!
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Old 10-01-2011, 06:53 PM
  #2  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Originally Posted by shaner72 View Post
I am normally an average or a little above average shooter. This year I started out shooting terrible. A buddy recommended a T-handle release so I went to bps and shot several. Found 1 a liked, and shot it for about 3-4 weeks. I started flinched really bad so I went back to an old wrist strap, but could not get it adjusted so i went and got a new wrist strap. I shot the best I have shot all year today but i was punching the trigger on purpose. Can I be a good shot by punching the trigger or do I need to go back to trying to squeeze? I never could do the push with bow hand and pull with back thing!!!
You will not have any kind of consistancy with punching the release button. You should teach yourself to squeeze the shot EVERY time. You can use your wrist strap release and just shorten it up a tad, just put it on one hole tighter. Then as you draw and reach your anchor point and settle the pin on your target, you place the pin/trigger of the release in the crook of your index finger first knuckle, not the pad.
As you settle the pin, began to reach for the pin, as you just begin to touch it, the shortened reach will allow you to surprise release the shot. Do this as you should begin to notice tighter groups all the time, not just once in awhile.
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Old 10-03-2011, 08:20 AM
  #3  
Spike
 
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If you were shooting well enough before, changing equipment was probably not the solution, in the first place.

Something that could help is to get in front of a large target butt (one you can't miss). Get close to the butt (5 yds. or so) and shoot with your eyes closed for a while. Just get oriented enough to keep your arrows on the butt and don't worry about aiming. Concentrate on your form (bow arm, anchor, stance) and how the shot feels. This method tends to get you more in tune with how a good shot feels and will carry over when you start shooting normally. After doing this for a little while, turn a target backwards, or just use a blank piece of paper (no bullseye), and fasten it to the butt. Back up to 10-20 yds. and aim for the center of the paper. Do this for a while, concentrating only on center mass and how the shot feels.

When you start to feel more confident, put up your bullseye target and see how it goes. If the problem persists, go back to square one.
Don't worry if it takes a while, just keep at it. This is something most of us go through, to some extent, at one time or another. Sometimes you can get over it in a couple of hours, sometimes it takes a lot longer but, if you keep at it you'll be O.K.

As for punching your release, just work on a good smooth pull that is comfortable to you. Finger placement isn't important, as long as it is consistant. I like to hook my finger on the trigger and use shoulder tension/back pressure to trigger the release but, that's something you can work on after you get your confidence back.

Good luck.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:03 AM
  #4  
Spike
 
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If you were shooting well enough before, changing equipment was probably not the solution, in the first place.

Something that could help is to get in front of a large target butt (one you can't miss). Get close to the butt (5 yds. or so) and shoot with your eyes closed for a while. Just get oriented enough to keep your arrows on the butt and don't worry about aiming. Concentrate on your form (bow arm, anchor, stance) and how the shot feels. This method tends to get you more in tune with how a good shot feels and will carry over when you start shooting normally. After doing this for a little while, turn a target backwards, or just use a blank piece of paper (no bullseye), and fasten it to the butt. Back up to 10-20 yds. and aim for the center of the paper. Do this for a while, concentrating only on center mass and how the shot feels.

When you start to feel more confident, put up your bullseye target and see how it goes. If the problem persists, go back to square one.
Don't worry if it takes a while, just keep at it. This is something most of us go through, to some extent, at one time or another. Sometimes you can get over it in a couple of hours, sometimes it takes a lot longer but, if you keep at it you'll be O.K.

As for punching your release, just work on a good smooth pull that is comfortable to you. Finger placement isn't important, as long as it is consistant. I like to hook my finger on the trigger and use shoulder tension/back pressure to trigger the release but, that's something you can work on after you get your confidence back.

Good luck.
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Old 10-06-2011, 12:09 PM
  #5  
Spike
 
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When you changed and started punching you likely were timing the shot for the release to go off at exactly the right time. When a timer is "on", he is nearly unbeatable. But when he is "off", he becomes very eratic and can't hit anything. If he keeps it up, he will usually develop target panic bad enough to make him quit archery.

There are a couple of pros who can do it, but 99% of us can't.

For most of us neither punching or squeezing with our fingers is the answer. Best accuracy is achieved by setting our trigger finger like an unmoving steel hook and using our back muscles to pull through. The visualization that most use is trying to hit the wall behind us with our elbow. Keep the direction of the pull in line with the arrow and the target. And use your shoulder muscles as little as possible.

Allen
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Old 10-13-2011, 04:17 PM
  #6  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Default They can sell you the most expensive bow;

they don't sell and teach you calmness. And calmness isn't necessarily an American trait. We are usually in a rush to just punch out that target.
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Old 11-12-2011, 11:51 AM
  #7  
Spike
 
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Definatley squeeze the trigger in my opinion, if you punch the trigger to much youll find that you take your pin off your intended target, it might seem miniscule at 20 or 30 yards but if you back up to 50 to 60 yards and punch the trigger youll notice that your arrows are hitting all over the place, where as if you gently squeeze and then all of the sudden the bow goes off your arrows will start to find their mark at longer and longer distances
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:46 PM
  #8  
Spike
 
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Give this a try !! Stand at approximately 7 ft. away from your target; draw and aim then shut your eyes, pressure up on the trigger only and squeeze your shoulder blades together on your back this should give you a suprise release. Do this several times then shoot at 20 yards ( with your eyes open ) and simulate the same release. It has improved my form alot.
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Old 03-25-2012, 06:29 PM
  #9  
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Punching the trigger will never give you consistant accuracy. The tactic of moving very close to the target and drawing, aiming and then closing your eyes to concentrat on the release can do wonders to improve your ability.
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