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Beginner Predator Hunter

Old 08-21-2018, 09:44 AM
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Spike
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Default Beginner Predator Hunter

Hey guys, Iím a freshman in college and have a little hunting experience but not much. I am interested in predator hunting. What gear such as gun, game call, or anything else would I need to get? I am on a budget so I donít want to break the bank on buying this stuff. If some experienced hunters could help me out Iíd really appreciate it!
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Old 08-21-2018, 05:42 PM
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What have you hunted and what hunting gear do you already have?
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:35 PM
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Good camo, 4 or 5 handcalls of specific types, and a well built AR is all I really need.
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Old 08-21-2018, 08:00 PM
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Hey,
congratulations on your new adventure. Iíve been in similar shoes. Itís not as simple as a one sentence answer and I would be more than willing to help you. You and anyone else contacted through email or my instagram is ridge_grunt. Best of luck to you.
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Old 08-22-2018, 09:05 AM
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Originally Posted by elkman30
What have you hunted and what hunting gear do you already have?
Iíve hunted deer, turkey, water fowl a few times each and Iíve run a small trap line. I have good camo. I was wondering more specifically what gun and calls.
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Old 08-22-2018, 10:55 AM
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Default Read these:

Read these in our Predator Hunting Tactics and Reference Section:

Predator Hunting Essentials

Predator Calling Plan of Attack

Call sounds for year 'round

Handcalls vs. Electronic

Calling different Predator Species

Scouting and Set Design

Spend some time reading those topics, and others in our Sub-forum here. You’ll come up with more specific questions for which we’ll be able to give more specific answers.

Last edited by Nomercy448; 08-22-2018 at 10:59 AM.
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Old 08-22-2018, 03:52 PM
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All you need is a cheap 223 and decent call I run fox pro but have called a lot of stuff with cheap calls from Walmart and some camo there is no need to spend more than 500 to get started. My call cost more than my rifle no need to drop a grand on a ar a 300 dollar rifle will kill as many as a 3000 dollar one will. READ everything you can find and like you did here ask questions then throw out all answers that you think are from left field and ever time you manage to call something in its a lesson pay close attention to the way it is acting so you can learn to read their body language.
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Old 08-22-2018, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by bwilkins99


I’ve hunted deer, turkey, water fowl a few times each and I’ve run a small trap line. I have good camo. I was wondering more specifically what gun and calls.
Not trying to be a PITA but a lot of this depends on you. There are more precise answers in subforum topics as NoMercy said.

If you have a deer rifle, you can easily pop a yote if you're not worried about tearing up the fur. If you're looking to save and sell the fur (depends on your state), then any 17 or 22 caliber centerfire will work well. You don't have to have some kind of AR platform to hunt coyotes. Some people prefer mouth calls and others like the electronic calls. You can buy a used electronic call or one of the less expensive ones if you're inclined to go that route. Some people buy motorized fur decoys and others just tie something to a stick that flutters well in a light breeze. It's kind of like when you started hunting other game. You didn't buy all the gear up front. You bought enough to try that species and see if you like that kind of hunting. Then you buy more stuff if you get hooked.

Since you obviously have the internet, start watching the coyote hunting videos (they're free). Look at how the "experts" in the videos are hunting, the kind of terrain and cover they're hunting in and read a lot of online articles on hunting. The most winning world champs are Al Morris and Garvin Young. The have lots of articles and quite a few free videos on YouTube. They also like to explain their strategy and tactics. Then start reading articles and posts on this forum about how people on here hunt yotes. Yes, that means checking some of those subforums--They really do have a lot of excellent information. As you learn more, you'll find yourself asking more detailed and precise questions that go beyond just simple beginner stuff. What's cool is a lot of these guys will be very happy to help you along. Hopefully this helps enough for you to grab a call and your deer rifle and go hunt coyotes.
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Old 08-23-2018, 05:07 PM
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I've never used Camo (much), my outfit is most always olive drab or middle brown. I am scent conscious and use scent free soap and hang my clothes outside. When I turn my head to look around or move my rifle for a shot, I do it in slow motion or even move slightly with the breeze. They have exceptional hearing and spot movement, any unnatural sound or movement can put them on alert, I'v spooked them with the click of my safety. Patience and being able to sit still for long periods is a real plus. I've had some really close shots.

I use my Deer rifle, the vast majority of my shots are flank/lungs and at a diagonal, in the front, exit past the shoulder and before the guts. Really doesn't mess up much fur. The Deer bullets don't expand much, if at all. Gut shots are to be avoided, they tend to explode into a grizzly mess.

IMO is if you don't move and they don't hear you or scent you it is unlikely you are going to spook them.

I usually go where the Coyote food is, places with a lot of Mice and Rabbits.

I walk a square, maybe 300-400 hundred yards on a side, look for tracks, Rabbit and Mice droppings. I keep track of the breeze morning and evening- I use Google Satellite and mark the spots where small game is and where I see Yotes or tracks or scat. I pick out places with good fields of fire. I most always set up on the level or down hill (bottom of the ridge or hill). The majority of Yote and Fox sightings they were using the terrain to their advantage, looking downhill. I set up so the wind favors me, likely someplace with multiple approaches and where Rodents are plentiful.

Yotes and Fox tend to make the rounds and hunt spots where they have been successful before. They can get pretty darned predictable. Water is a consideration, they need to drink

A little brain work and reasoning and you can figure out likely places, And once you've found those spots, they are generational and/or used by the newbies in the area. They often follow the scent of their predecessors, the Yote or Fox you shot last week.

If you go where the Fox and Yotes are, either ambush or calling is likely to be successful. Another good thing about predictor hunting is you get to check out other edible game in the off season. I just don't scout exclusively for Predator.

I might sit quietly in a likely areas a hundred times a year and am successful maybe twenty percent f the time. Once I make a kill in one area, I move onto another for at least a week. Even the unsuccessful hunts aren't necessarily unproductive. I get to see other wildlife, game movements and habits in the area.and stress relief. People walk around blindly in the city, training yourself to look and actually see in the fields and woods opens up a whole new world.

Some of my most successful spots is where agriculture meets brush or farm roads. They like to hunt the ditch early morning next to farm roads. Best guess is they don't much favor moving through dew covered crops, grass and brush.

And lastly a good pair of binoculars is a real plus. There may not be much going on where you are set up, but you may make a sighting out of rifle range and set up there next time. Binoculars also help you pick out movement at closer ranges, in the grass or through the brush. I've watched them check out a likely brush pile or whatever, from a distance and set up on their favorite spots next time.
My methods may not be the flavor of the day (whiz bang game callers), but they are reasonably successful.

Last edited by MudderChuck; 08-23-2018 at 06:36 PM.
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