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That is why it is called hunting.

Old 11-30-2015, 03:38 PM
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Fork Horn
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Default That is why it is called hunting.

Decided to make some stands this evening for some coyotes. First stand was a bust but the second stand was a little more eventful. It was about 4:30 and I made a long lone howl with my diaphragm and not response. Then I did a coyote duet on my Foxpro and chimed in with me doing some howls and after that series I had three coyotes sound off about 100 yards from me. Of course I couldn’t see them because it was so thick but after they started howling, I howled a little more. Me and one coyote were talking smack back and forth. He would howl then I would do the same as what he did and this went on for about 5 minutes. I was hoping he would come in but nothing. I broke out the rabbit distress and made a few calling sequences but it became too dark. Well it was an eventful evening none the less. Heading back out in the morning to hopefully lay one down.
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Old 11-30-2015, 06:33 PM
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Sounds to me like you had a ton of fun !

Now it's time to close the deal.........................
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Old 12-01-2015, 08:39 AM
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Good luck with those Coyotes! I just recently purchased an Innoteck caller and am waiting for the end of deer season here in Va. to start getting after some Yotes.
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Old 12-01-2015, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Brandon_SPC
.......Me and one coyote were talking smack back and forth. He would howl then I would do the same as what he did and this went on for about 5 minutes. I was hoping he would come in but nothing........
Not a 'yote hunter here, but you've got me wondering: If your calls sounded less dominant, would the 'yote have been more likely to come in? Just a thought worth considering, even though the situation didn't occur that way.
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Old 12-01-2015, 11:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Game Stalker
Not a 'yote hunter here, but you've got me wondering: If your calls sounded less dominant, would the 'yote have been more likely to come in? Just a thought worth considering, even though the situation didn't occur that way.
I tried to sound not very intimidating. I actually sounded like the youngest one of the group. The one that was howling back over and over bad a very deep belly howl.

We went out today and was able to locate six different sets coyotes. The smallest being only two coyotes and the biggest around 6-8 but for some reason we could not get any to come in. Hunting this thick stuff is hard.
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Old 12-01-2015, 12:56 PM
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Since you have a foxpro and it seems you call okay on a diaphragm; try to wake them up with some howling, then switch to some soft distress calls including some "Lucky Bird" and like sounds.

Hunting coyotes in thick cover is difficult - I hate to say it, but I bet they came in and busted you ??

Coyotes get educated quickly, so don't do anything the same.

Expect them to come in to your set-up from down wind - so plan accordingly.

IMO the mornings are better, because no one wants to go to bed hungry ................ !!!

Good luck bud.
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Old 12-01-2015, 09:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Sheridan
Since you have a foxpro and it seems you call okay on a diaphragm; try to wake them up with some howling, then switch to some soft distress calls including some "Lucky Bird" and like sounds.

Hunting coyotes in thick cover is difficult - I hate to say it, but I bet they came in and busted you ??

Coyotes get educated quickly, so don't do anything the same.

Expect them to come in to your set-up from down wind - so plan accordingly.

IMO the mornings are better, because no one wants to go to bed hungry ................ !!!

Good luck bud.
Thanks I will give it a try I seem to get a a lot of vocalization from them right before a rain. The last one I shot was the morning before we had a rain and the same with today. When we had our cold front and it drop 40 degrees not a single one would respond.

Now my calling sequences today went like this. I would open the set up with a few lone howls wait a few minutes then do a coyote pair, or duet on the foxpro and chime in with the diaphragm. After waiting about 5 minutes I would do a rabbit in distress with my diaphragm for about 5-7 sequences calling from anywhere 1-2 minutes with a 30-60 second break. Then after that I went to blue jay in distress for about the same and if nothing yet try to end with some pup distress. Usually I will be on stand from about the 30-40 minute mark.

I will be back after them next week. Still a learning curve but I pay attention to all the information thrown my way and apply it.

I have also thought about getting my climber and using that. Place the call about 40 yards up wind of me and be about 15 feet in a tree and see if that would help. Because I can easily see farther in a tree than on the ground. Have you ever done that?
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Old 12-02-2015, 07:15 PM
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I hunt from the ground, but I always look for hillsides (or at least higher ground)!

Seems to me that you are on the right track.............Keep after them.
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Old 12-03-2015, 05:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Brandon_SPC
Thanks I will give it a try I seem to get a a lot of vocalization from them right before a rain. The last one I shot was the morning before we had a rain and the same with today. When we had our cold front and it drop 40 degrees not a single one would respond.

Now my calling sequences today went like this. I would open the set up with a few lone howls wait a few minutes then do a coyote pair, or duet on the foxpro and chime in with the diaphragm. After waiting about 5 minutes I would do a rabbit in distress with my diaphragm for about 5-7 sequences calling from anywhere 1-2 minutes with a 30-60 second break. Then after that I went to blue jay in distress for about the same and if nothing yet try to end with some pup distress. Usually I will be on stand from about the 30-40 minute mark.

I will be back after them next week. Still a learning curve but I pay attention to all the information thrown my way and apply it.

I have also thought about getting my climber and using that. Place the call about 40 yards up wind of me and be about 15 feet in a tree and see if that would help. Because I can easily see farther in a tree than on the ground. Have you ever done that?
it has been my experiance that I do better if I do not switch up my calls so much.
maybe do a locator howl or two but then I stick with the "food" in distress calls. stands to reson a coyote would be more likely to come to a call to fill it's belly then to find a pal or a fight.


once I start with A RABBIT OR FAWN IN DISTRESS , or whatever call I choose ,I generally stick with it for duration of call, occasionally after 20-30 minutes if I have no luck I might switch to something else and occasionally it even works. but if you think about it, how often does a wounded animal in the wild suddenly go from squealing like a rabbit to bleating like a fawn. coyotes are not dumb and they learn quickly.


one thing I have found to be very effective, if A coyote lays up a couple hundred yards out and will not come closer, is to softly do a few lip squeaks, don't go crazy ,this will only scare them off. just try 1 OR 2 THEN WAIT , SEE HOW THEY RESPOND. if they start coming again, go back to your distress call but call softly. this technique often is more then they can resist.
each call and coyote is different and no one method is correct in every situation. sometimes you have to switch things up, I just prefer to wait until next call to try something different.

whatever you do , good luck and keep us posted.
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Old 12-03-2015, 06:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Brandon_SPC
Thanks I will give it a try I seem to get a a lot of vocalization from them right before a rain. The last one I shot was the morning before we had a rain and the same with today. When we had our cold front and it drop 40 degrees not a single one would respond.

Now my calling sequences today went like this. I would open the set up with a few lone howls wait a few minutes then do a coyote pair, or duet on the foxpro and chime in with the diaphragm. After waiting about 5 minutes I would do a rabbit in distress with my diaphragm for about 5-7 sequences calling from anywhere 1-2 minutes with a 30-60 second break. Then after that I went to blue jay in distress for about the same and if nothing yet try to end with some pup distress. Usually I will be on stand from about the 30-40 minute mark.

I will be back after them next week. Still a learning curve but I pay attention to all the information thrown my way and apply it.

I have also thought about getting my climber and using that. Place the call about 40 yards up wind of me and be about 15 feet in a tree and see if that would help. Because I can easily see farther in a tree than on the ground. Have you ever done that?
I prefer to stay on the ground. nothing more fun then calling a coyote within a foot ,where you could literally bash em with a bat if quick and brave enough. plus I am basically lazy and prefer not to pack a bunch of equipment ,I can do without.
of coarse I am in idaho . visibility is not in most cases a problem. I have thousands of square acres to hunt at my disposal and fairly low hunting pressure on predators so probably not the same conditions you face.
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