Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Firearms Forum > Reloading
Help reloading .45 Colt (+P) >

Help reloading .45 Colt (+P)

Reloading Share techniques for reloading, where to get the hottest in reloading equipment and learn how to reload from fellow hunters.

Help reloading .45 Colt (+P)

Old 08-08-2011, 04:18 AM
  #1  
Banned
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 388
Default Help reloading .45 Colt (+P)

I've just bought a .45 LC and will start reloading, mostly +P rounds. I'm having trouble finding out which dies I need (RCBS). Do I use a regular shell holder or an extended? And which one do I get? RCBS lists all their holders, but does not tell you which is for what caliber!
Do I follow the same proceedures as with rifle ammo? Clean & lube case, decap, etc?
Can I safely reuse factory brass for such high pressures?
I am ordering some Starline but do have soem factory brass also.
Any suggestions on powder(s) also. I'm leaning towards the Alliant 2400. The only thing I'm sure of is using a Nosler &/or Hornady bullet and Winchester LP primers.
Why offer .451, .452, .454?
Mostly . . . dies? . . . proceedures? . . . loads?

Yes....I have a gun that is safe for +P. Redhawk.

Last edited by dig4gold; 08-08-2011 at 05:20 AM.
dig4gold is offline  
Old 08-08-2011, 02:03 PM
  #2  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Wide open Nevada
Posts: 515
Default

1st ,Colts come w/assorted bores and cylinder throat dia.from.450-455 as the load data often bridges guns that have been around 100 years and those the rolled off the line last Tuesday. Many of your bullet choices also cover (by case length only)45Gap to 460S&W.

2nd,yes your new production brass will be fine,the factory loads were probably deference loads, Cor-Bon a noted exception,loaded to around 18000psi . The brass will hardly know it was hit.

3rd take some of your fired brass try it in each chamber if it all fits all 6 then only size the 1st 1/3 of the case no sense over working the brass and being back asking about your coke bottle shaped cases.

4th if you bought steel dies then yes just like your rifle, if you have/buy/bought carbide dies then no need to lube more than say 1 in 4-5 if at all.

5 th I can't say about 2400,I use Unique and H110 and very quickly get more load than I need or want to shoot much of. W/Unique I can get to 1000fps w/a 265 grain cast bullet,and have been over 1200 w/H110 just not for me or my Black Hawk.

6th a standard shell holder will be fine I have them in LEE and RCBS and they work fine w/the Rock Checkers and Partner presses.

My personal notes here the Old Colts cartridge will beat the 357 up all day long w/standard loads. Most of the cases that I've come across so far can be readily trimmed back for Shofields,and clear down to ACP length w/correct data for each length.
harter66 is offline  
Old 08-11-2011, 09:52 AM
  #3  
Fork Horn
 
Bucktail_Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Northern IL
Posts: 267
Default

Speer reloading manual covers the .45lc +p rounds. And will answer a lot of your questions

I use H110, Win 296 and use .451 and .452 cannelured bullets (no need for cannelured bullets for cowboy loads) Also, I have reloaded factory brass with no issues. I bought 1000 starline cases years back before the price increase.
Be careful on compressed loads, very easy to bulge the case.

I use a Dillon press, no need to lube. You might want to call RCBS customer service for direction.


bb
Bucktail_Bob is offline  
Old 08-11-2011, 05:25 PM
  #4  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Rivesville, WV
Posts: 3,192
Default

Personally I like 2400 powder for my heavy 44 magnum and 45 Colt loads(light loads also).

You need to read up on reloading revolver cartrdiges. They are different than loading rifle shells. And the dies are also different. And you use diferent dies than you use for rifle reloading.

I prefer to crimp in a separate step with a separate die. For a revolver a crimp is necessary. Also to get good performance from 45 Colt loads you definintley need to use a HEAVY crimp. You will get substantially more consistent burn with the heavier crimp.

Take your time. There is nothing difficult about it. Just different.

Some people do not trim the brass. Or at least their semi-auto brass. Not sure about their revolver brass. However I always trim every piece of revolver brass to the same length. When applying a crimp on heavy loads consistency is king. IMO it is impossible to control pressure consistency if your brass is of different length. Just an opinion. Tom.
HEAD0001 is offline  
Old 08-28-2011, 11:38 AM
  #5  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 204
Default

I have loaded the .45Colt for many years. I also like using H110-Win296, Unique, and have used Lilgun as well. I prefer to use Hard cast bullets but have had good luck with the xtp and Sierra bullets in 300gr.
When you use a heavy load, full length resizing can be needed. If you are loading to cowboy pressure loads then the full length isn't as important. Simply flaring the mouth to seat the bullets would be enough. I have the RCBS carbide dies so lubing the cases isn't necessary. If you don't have the Carbide or titanium nitride then you will need to lube cases.
Palladin8 is offline  
Old 08-28-2011, 12:25 PM
  #6  
Nontypical Buck
 
Pawildman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: S.W. Pa.-- Heart in North Central Pa. mountains-
Posts: 2,600
Default

Originally Posted by HEAD0001 View Post
Personally I like 2400 powder for my heavy 44 magnum and 45 Colt loads(light loads also).

You need to read up on reloading revolver cartrdiges. They are different than loading rifle shells. And the dies are also different. And you use diferent dies than you use for rifle reloading.

I prefer to crimp in a separate step with a separate die. For a revolver a crimp is necessary. Also to get good performance from 45 Colt loads you definintley need to use a HEAVY crimp. You will get substantially more consistent burn with the heavier crimp.

Take your time. There is nothing difficult about it. Just different.

Some people do not trim the brass. Or at least their semi-auto brass. Not sure about their revolver brass. However I always trim every piece of revolver brass to the same length. When applying a crimp on heavy loads consistency is king. IMO it is impossible to control pressure consistency if your brass is of different length. Just an opinion. Tom.
..... Listen to what Tom said. He's absolutely correct, and case length is critical when loading these type of rounds. You gotta make sure the crimp is the same place each time. Trimming is the key. I use 2400 also.. a little dirty, but gives me good results.
Pawildman is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.