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Hang On Treestand (newby) Questions

Old 08-25-2013, 06:21 PM
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Default Hang On Treestand (newby) Questions

New to using hang-on stands (always been a ladder/climber guy). I'd rather not kill myself using one, and I have some questions:

1) I've seen people mention "overtightening" the ratchet strap. Is this really a problem? I planned on adding a second strap to hold the stand in place. Is this a bad idea? If it's a good idea, should I put it in the same place as the first strap, at the base of the stand, or somewhere else?

2) Is it ok to leave a stand up for an extended period of time (i.e, months or the whole season)? or should you reset the stand every time you use it? or something in between?

Any other safety advice will be more than appreciated.
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Old 08-25-2013, 08:48 PM
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heres the answers.. when your hanging a portable stand its easy. leave the stand folded closed so its basically flat against the tree..strap on the top ratchet first just about as tight as you can... then open the stand and basically slam the platform down hard so it digs into tree. then put a second strap towards the bottom of the stand and tighten. doing it that way (instead of hanging it with it open ) makes the stand as level and tight to the tree as possible...as far as leaving it out you can 100% leave it out all year long. just take seat pad with you at end of season or each time u get out whatever you decide just to avoid the critters and the weather.
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Old 08-25-2013, 08:55 PM
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some people use just one ratchet sttrap at top of stand because thats really how they are designed. the top strap holds in agsinst tree and the platform digging into tree at bottom keeps pressure against tree when your in the stand. i personally use 2 straps for safety. for an extra couple bucks for a strap to keep the stand as tight and safe as possible its worth it. especially if your new to hangon stands or if your a big guy. good luck with it all. theres 100s of stands to choose from spend the extra money and get a stand with a big comfy seat . nothing sucks more than being uncomfortable and moving around when your ass goes numb ha ha
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Old 08-26-2013, 01:34 AM
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I would recommend that you take the stands down after hunting season but if you don't, then I would do this. If I leave a stand up, I loosen the straps and take out any way for someone to get up to the stand. Safety reasons. You need to loosen the straps because when the tree starts to grow in the spring, the straps become extra tight and could break. Or you may have to cut them to get them off. Just my experience.
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Old 08-26-2013, 04:44 PM
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no need to take stand down just throw a chain and lock on it and loosen 1 strap up a couple clicks. take the bottom couple steps out or if u use climbing sticks take bottom section out and your good to go.
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Old 08-26-2013, 05:24 PM
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Great advice, thanks guys. I'm a public land hunter. I've left ladders out chained to a tree for the season, and never had a theft problem, but I can't leave them up year around anyway. I'm mostly just trying to get back into areas that are a little more remote, and transporting a ladder in isn't practical.
I saw a product in Field & Stream or Outdoor Life that was sort of a torque device that was supposed to keep you from overtightening a strap on a hang on stand. I always figured the tighter the better when it comes to a strap, but, not being experienced with hang-ons, got to wondering if I was planning on doing something wrong (my idea was, like NjHunter, to add a strap at the bottom and maybe a redundant second one at the top).
Thanks again, to you both.
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Old 08-27-2013, 06:51 PM
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overtightening the top strap will most likely make the platform you stand on not sit level, it will be cocked upwards. just make sure you keep the stand closed and put the back side flat against the tree. then snug the top strap and slam the platform down and add that bottom strap then tighten it up. thats all you gotta do. one other thing that I personally like to do is find a tree that starts to lean out near where you would put your stand. only a slight lean though. this way you can lean back just a little bit instead of sitting straight up and down. it will help you relax a little more and feel like you have a little more room to move. you'll see what i mean if you try it out. but good luck man
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Old 08-31-2013, 08:09 AM
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Here's what I do. I will tighten the main strap (or chain) as tight as I can. Sometimes that can result in the platform being tilted upward. I always place a second strap, lower down on the "post" that connects the seat to the foot platform. This will pull the lock-on firmly against the tree.

I do leave my lock-on up during the season but not the off-season. For sure you need to inspect the straps carefully before using one. Squirrels and rats will often cut gnaw at these fabric straps, especially where you have been handling them. I suspect going after the salt from sweaty hands. I have straps and lift ropes laying at the base of the tree cut into pieces !!

If you have read any of my many posts about tree stand use, you have seen this before. Be dang sure when you are hunting from any tree stand ... ladder, climber, lock-on, home-made platform, whatever ... always wear a quality safety harness. These are not expensive especially when one considers the possibilities. Good ones can be had for well under $100.

Last edited by Mojotex; 08-31-2013 at 08:12 AM.
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Old 09-07-2013, 05:34 AM
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Thanks, NJ & Mojo, hadn't checked this thread for a little while. I plan on adding a strap (maybe 2, I'm paranoid, lol) to my set up. I've been using ladders and a climber for years. Decided to add a hang on into the mix for added versatility (easier to carry in farther away from the crowds). And, yes, I have a good safety harness -- HSS lite, and I like it.
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Old 09-07-2013, 12:27 PM
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Ditto to everything that was said so far. Hang on stands are an easy inexpensive way to get set up farther in the woods. I use 2 straps always, Chain or cable lock. I would also advise if you can to use a hunter safety system lifeline. I also remove 1st 5 pegs when I leave to keep someone from getting in the stand.

When you talk to people about hunting they always ask details about what a stand is and looks like so I made this short video last year while in stand with my son, so check it out. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8fsQ...ature=youtu.be

Disclaimer: amateur videos all taken with my phone.
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