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.257 Weatherby magnum distances & scope

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.257 Weatherby magnum distances & scope

Old 03-06-2015, 07:19 PM
  #11  
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I've seen people miss at point blank range - hell, I've missed at point blank range ?!?!

Aim small, miss small; particularly if you are shooting "smaller" targets.


NoMercy - I like a powerful scope also !!!

500 yards on a coyote is a small target for me.

Last edited by Sheridan; 03-06-2015 at 07:22 PM.
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Old 03-06-2015, 07:55 PM
  #12  
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Originally Posted by Sheridan

500 yards on a coyote is a small target for me.
was sighting in my 6.5 few years ago, a buddy who lives close saw me and walked over, I was meticulously working on my scope, while he was giving me grief about taking so much time sighting in, a crow landed at 300 yards downrange, he said if your sighted in shoot that crow, I said ok, as I moved the rifle the crow took off, flew a ways and landed, I just ranged it, set the drop, held 1/2 moa for wind and fired, the round decapitated the crow and my buddy was speechless, the range was 510 yards.
RR
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Old 03-06-2015, 08:16 PM
  #13  
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Crows are "smaller" targets yet, and that's you behind the gun.


I would have given it a try, but I would want my 24X scope to even see it - LOL


...............and that's out of a tree, not in an open field either.

That's good shoot'in !

Last edited by Sheridan; 03-06-2015 at 08:20 PM.
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Old 03-06-2015, 10:04 PM
  #14  
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Originally Posted by Topgun 3006
I don't know why people that want to show their skill at 1000 yards can't keep it on paper or gongs, rather than a living, breathing animal...
I suppose I would answer this statement like this:

Consider time alone in the shower versus time alone in with a long and lean buxom blonde... Pretty easy to see why there's a difference in 'practice' and a living, breathing animal...

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Old 03-07-2015, 05:04 AM
  #15  
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I know most don't like outfitters on this site but I've been a guide since 17 and am now 43 years old that's a lot of field testing of every kind of rifle caliber and bullet construction on game. For me this is a two part topic.

In the right hands it does not matter what caliber your shooting to 600 yards on what animal. I'm not really talking about 223 at buffalo but we all know it could happen possibly who knows.

In the right hands it does not matter what bullet or weight would do to an animal, that animal is going down. No FMJ's of course.

Nothing beats accuracy and shot placement.

So the answer is if you can stay MOA you can shoot as far as you can stay in those boundaries. On super windy days without superior knowledge avoid most shots that are not comfortable. So close to 11" at 1000 yards is very close to hit, miss or wound on most deer sized animals. Coyotes you probably just missed. That is simply math as stated before.

From field experience I've seen just as many misses or wounding on game under 100 yards than over 300 yards. My personal thought is most shots under 100 yards come quickly and all kinds of things can go wrong. 300 yard shots distance you from the animal and give time usually to make a calculated shot. I have talked people through long range shots many many times. And in my opinion 600 yards is a very very long shot for those that don't shoot at that range and there's always some kind of wind in the Rockies. So when there's a big ole bull elk at 500 yards or less and that's as close as we can get if the hunter is okay with the shot we are shooting, because I've spent days tracking animals with a leg blown off from a 50 yard shot. Ethics are one's own capabilities nobody else's.

Other than that unless you practice a lot your limitations are on yourself.
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Old 03-07-2015, 06:05 AM
  #16  
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couldn't have said it better black, we are only limited by ourselves and our capabilities with the equipment we choose to use.
its not something to attempt for the first time on game, took me 2 years of weekly practice to gain the confidance to send a bullet at game at a grand.
RR
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Old 03-07-2015, 08:12 AM
  #17  
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Originally Posted by Ridge Runner
couldn't have said it better black, we are only limited by ourselves and our capabilities with the equipment we choose to use.
its not something to attempt for the first time on game, took me 2 years of weekly practice to gain the confidance to send a bullet at game at a grand.
RR
And another thing, you (and me to a certain point) shoot groups smaller at 600+ yards then most guys do at 100 yards. So to say that we have a better chance at missing or wounding is BS.
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Old 03-07-2015, 08:44 AM
  #18  
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these guys who have never experienced it won't believe it, but how many deer are shot high in the lungs at 40 yards and when the muzzle blast hits them in the face, just whirl and run, now those deer are running 52fps, if its a fatal liver hit they could live what 2 minutes?, that gives them time to travel over 1 mile, they change direction just out of site whats the chances of finding them? 50% maybe, you gutshoot one at 600 yards, they do not relate gunfire that far away to danger, they do not run with blind panic, they are hurt and just want to bed up. shot one years ago at daylight at 611 yards, instead of broadside she was quartering too, liver hit her, she made 3 jumps, took 3 steps and bedded down at the edge of the field, I ranged her at 625, when she raised her head, sent an accubond right in front of her ear. liver shot one at 1350 yards, she was dead when we drove up, we watched her bed down, and her head start to sag.
so yes you make some bad hits at extended range, but they do not relate the shot to danger, so recovery is much easier.
RR
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Old 03-07-2015, 12:55 PM
  #19  
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Well said RR. That covers it in a nutshell. A liver or lung hit beyond 700 yards with a decent caliber will kill a deer or elk quick. They lay down and you wait 10 minutes and go get your winter meat supply.Same applies to moose. They just stand there, you hit them again, they stagger take a couple steps, and fall over. IMO nobody has the right to judge someone else who has the ability to put down game at longer ranges. If they can't do it themselves, they are envious of those that can and raise a big stink. They definitely would not want to hunt with me, because if I can see it, it's down.
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Old 03-07-2015, 04:30 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Blackelk
I know most don't like outfitters on this site but I've been a guide since 17 and am now 43 years old that's a lot of field testing of every kind of rifle caliber and bullet construction on game. For me this is a two part topic.
.....
I have to disagree with you on the emboldened part of your statement above. The opposite is far more accurate--Most members seem to like having outfitters on this site as it enables members to get an outfitter perspective and tap into their experience and knowledge (me included). I like seeing what kinds of hunts they offer, from the pricing to the accommodations, expectations and descriptions or the hunt, terrain, etc.

When an outfitter posts about a hunt, I can post a question in the forum or use a PM to ask more questions, just like being at a sportsman's show. In my neck of the woods, the sportsman's show only comes around once a year whereas on HNI, that opportunity exists all year long (extended response times expected during hunting seasons of course). That is a unique opportunity for all of us members who are interested in going on an outfitted hunt.

From a moderator point of view, I wish we had a 1,000 more outfitters actively posting on this website. How many hunting websites have that many outfitters posting and offering other members all of the above mentioned benefits? Not very many. From a website point of view, outfitter members bring a whole lot to the table, just like experienced hunters, shooters and all kinds of other members do. That's my .02 on your opinion about outfitters on this site--I respectfully disagree.

Now when you look at all of your experience with your personal hunting/shooting and watching all kinds of outfitted hunters hunting/shooting, it brings even more to the table. I'm not trying to blow smoke but couldn't let your above assumptions about opinions on outfitters go unrefuted.

Now going back to the side topic that has come up in this subject (long range hunting), there is no simple answer other than what Clint Eastwood/Dirty Harry said--A man's gotta know his limitations. Different people will have different limitations. That's just how life works.

Putting buck fever aside, there are probably a lot of hunters who don't practice much and should probably keep their shots to 150 yards or less. Many varmint hunters routinely practice and hunt out to 400-500 yards and would certainly be capable of accurately shooting a buck at those distances. Then there are people who regularly compete at distances from 600-1,000 yards and would certainly be capable of hitting a buck accurately at those distances. There are some who shoot over 1,000 yards on a regular basis and would be capable of accurately shooting deer at those ranges but that is a much smaller % of the hunting/shooting community.

I say accurately hit a buck at the various distances above as things can happen to blow a shot. The wind changes (has more affect at longer ranges obviously), the buck spooks at something else (not the hunter) or just about anything else that can cause us to miss a shot. That's part of shooting and part of hunting. It can happen at any range although it is far more common with shooters who practice less and those who aren't as capable (some people will never become good shots).

The range at which you limit yourself to shots at a buck is partly dependent on your long range shooting skills (or lack thereof) but is probably more dependent on whatever arbitrary range YOU think is ethical, etc. That's an individual decision although some states do impose some limitation depending on what weapons they allow for deer hunting (like blackpowder, shotgun only, etc.).

Arguing about what you think is an ethical range limitation for shooting deer is kind of pointless. If you honestly have a reasonable chance of hitting the deer, it's an acceptable range (your personal beliefs/preference notwithstanding) and an ethical shot. If you can't reasonably expect to hit a buck at whatever distance you're contemplating, I think all of us would agree that taking such a shot is unethical.

I've met some hunters who think it's not hunting unless you use a bow. Others limit it to blackpowder. Some limit it to pistols. Some prefer rifles and some prefer long distance (over 500 yards). It's all hunting and therefore enjoyable. In my lifetime, I hope to hunt with all methods. Regardless of the distance, you still have to locate the animal, get into position for a good shot and hope all of those other variables (nerves, shakes, wind, other animals, other hunters, etc.) don't mess up your shot.
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