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CA Gun Bill

Old 04-12-2010, 07:55 AM
  #1  
Fork Horn
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California Firearm Bills Up for Hearings

4/9/10

Three bills in California that threaten the rights of sportsmen to own or use firearms are scheduled to have hearings in the state Assembly next Tuesday, April 13.

Assembly Bill 1810, sponsored by Assemblyman Mike Feuer (D- LA), would require the state to keep registration information for all firearm transfers, including from transfers of commonly used hunting rifles and shotguns. Current California law only requires the state to keep a database containing the information acquired from handgun transfers. The information kept by the state includes the owner’s name and address as well as a description and serial number of the handgun.

AB 1810 will be heard on April 13 before the Assembly Committee on Public Safety.

“It’s bad enough that state keeps a handgun owners registry, a major infringement on second amendment rights as it is,” said Jeremy Rine, U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance (USSA) associate director of state services. “There surely is no justification for expanding the state’s registry to include all firearms.”

Assembly Bill 2186, sponsored by Assemblyman Kevin de Leon (D- LA), would prohibit a person convicted of a misdemeanor loaded firearms violation from owning or possessing a firearm for ten years. Misdemeanor convictions for carrying a loaded firearm in a vehicle, carrying a loaded firearm in public, or carrying a concealed firearm would all trigger the 10 year ban. In California, loaded firearms violations are some of the most common hunting-related citations issued and are often the result of an honest mistake. Regardless, this bill would still subject the violator to an overly-severe 10 year ban on the possession of firearms.

“Something as simple as forgetting to completely unload your hunting rifle before crossing a country road could result in being banned from owning or using a firearm for ten years,” said Rine. ”Simply put, this is a glaring example of a punishment that does not fit the crime.”

AB 2186 will be heard on April 13 before the Assembly Committee on Public Safety.

As reported previously, Assembly Bill 2223, introduced by Assemblyman Pedro Nava (D- Santa Barbara), would ban the use of traditional shot within California’s Wildlife Management Areas. These areas encompass more than one half million acres of state hunting and recreational shooting land. The California Fish and Game Commission (FGC) already has the authority to place restrictions on ammunition on a case by case basis. AB 2223 will simply circumvent the science-based regulatory process of the FGC and let politicians decide on what is appropriate ammunition to use on state lands.

AB 2223 will be heard on April 13 before the Assembly Committee on Water, Parks and Wildlife.

Take Action! California sportsmen should contact their state assembly members and urge them to oppose ABs 1810, 2186 and 2223. To find your state assembly member’s phone number and other contact information, use the USSA Legislative Action Center at www.ussportsmen.org/lac.
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Old 04-19-2010, 03:40 PM
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If a loaded firearm carries a fine, it is not a honest mistake, it is a stupidity mistake. You know it is illegal but still do it and get caught, no sympathy for you.
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Old 04-25-2010, 05:38 AM
  #3  
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rshunter - Someone should come up with a bill that would have a person's driver's license banned for 10 years if they get a traffic violation!

That would turn a few heads, maybe slow down the speeders in California.

I don't think so.

That kind of regulation is absolutely rediculous. Mistakes happen. Just because someone makes a mistake does not make them a dangerous criminal. Also, what defines a loaded firearm in California. I believe if there is anything in the magazine, it is loaded, which is pure B.S. All that does is give a person a "cooling off" period of about 10 seconds for him to get into the trunk to get the ammo before he starts shooting something up. I don't see a point in it at all.

The bottom line is hang the murders, and lock up the people who actually commit the REAL CRIMES AGAINST PEOPLE. Having a loaded gun in your car is not hurting anyone, just like having a loaded gun on your kitchen counter. It takes a person and a thought process to carry out the crime.

Later,

Marcial
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Old 04-25-2010, 06:14 AM
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If all sportsman Joined the NRA and gave a stand against all the anti's voting the gun bills and movements, we'd probably have nothing to worry about. It's time sportsmen and hunters everywhere joined the fight. It's time to stand up and say nope your not going to take our rights away. It's sad that everyone thinks they have the right to bear arms but not many will join forces against the ones fighting for it.

There's only one organization fighting for your 2nd admendment rights and that's the NRA. IF you think otherwise your a damn fool. Get envolved in the Friends of the NRA, the ILA, and the NRA. Support your local 4-h shooting sports clubs, Boyscouts, YHEC, and all the gun clubs in your area. I'm sorry to say the fight has come to your front door this time. You can no longer sit back and wait for someone else to fight your battles. The future is now and our lovely goverment officials are pushing their lobby's on our rights.

You like to hunt and fish great. But with out firearms how you going to hunt. And right after they take hunting the anti's will be after fishing rights. Your call. Sit back and bitch about it or do something about it.

Even if your only becoming a NRA member your atleast saying you agree with the right to own firearms and that $25.00 would make a huge amount of money if you could get everyone to get on board.

Millions of hunters millions are our voices but yet how many go to the voting booth and vote? How many stay at home and just bitch.? More than go to the voting booths. We are our own worse enemy in the cause. I say if your not a supporter your not worthy. That's just how it's gonna play out. I give alot of time to the NRA foundation that's my choice. Give up your beer money for a week, at least your not going to have to turn in your guns for life.

Excuse my passion but it's time to tell people how it's all gonna come down.
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Old 04-30-2010, 04:18 PM
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Out of a total U.S. population of about 310 million people it is estimated that about 80 million are gun owners. The most recent statistics from the USFWS indicate that 12.5 million hunting licenses were sold in the U.S. in 2006, down from 14 million in 1996. When you consider that some hunters purchase licenses in more than one state and are probably counted more than once and a significant number of hunters only use bows, the percentage of gun owners in this country who hunt with firearms is probably less than 15% of all gun owners. While the number of gun owners has held steady, the number of hunters continues to drop.

The continuing decline in the hunting population is what has me concerned and I do not think it has anything to do with gun laws. Buying a rifle or shotgun is the easiest part of hunting these days. Urbanization, suburban sprawl and the recognition by land owners that they can charge large sums of money for people to hunt on their land has drastically reduced hunting opportunities and has made finding and getting to a place to hunt time consuming and expensive. I grew up in a house out in the middle of the woods in Western Massachusetts. I could walk out my back door and I could be hunting. Now that I live in a suburb of Sacramento, California I have to drive at least an hour to find one of DFG's wildlife areas where hunting is allowed. The hunting is usually poor and many of the areas look like the city dump.

I am 59 years old and I have taken my two sons hunting with me and while they have showed some interest I doubt they will continue to hunt when I am gone. They are like most young people, there are a lot of things they would rather be doing than getting up at 4:00 A.M. to go hunting. My father was from Boston and did not hunt but my maternal grandfather lived in a small town in northern New Hampshire and was an avid hunter, trapper and fisherman his entire life of 89 years and would take my cousins and me out hunting and fishing whenever possible. I inherited his Savage model 99 in .303 Savage that was manufactured in 1908. Young people today do not have someone like my grandfather to introduce them to hunting and mentor them.

I know there are many people that fear they will lose the right to own firearms but I do think that there is little danger of that happening . I am much more concerned about the future of the sport of hunting. Hunting is declining not because of gun control laws but because finding places to hunt is becoming more difficult. That is why as a hunter I financially support groups like Ducks Unlimited that work to provide more habitat and hunting opportunities rather than the NRA and its fixation on the politics of gun control. I do not want to own a gun just for the sake of owning it, I want to be able to hunt with it and that is getting harder all the time.
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Old 04-30-2010, 04:48 PM
  #6  
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Originally Posted by Lemaitre
Out of a total U.S. population of about 310 million people it is estimated that about 80 million are gun owners. The most recent statistics from the USFWS indicate that 12.5 million hunting licenses were sold in the U.S. in 2006, down from 14 million in 1996. When you consider that some hunters purchase licenses in more than one state and are probably counted more than once and a significant number of hunters only use bows, the percentage of gun owners in this country who hunt with firearms is probably less than 15% of all gun owners. While the number of gun owners has held steady, the number of hunters continues to drop.

The continuing decline in the hunting population is what has me concerned and I do not think it has anything to do with gun laws. Buying a rifle or shotgun is the easiest part of hunting these days. Urbanization, suburban sprawl and the recognition by land owners that they can charge large sums of money for people to hunt on their land has drastically reduced hunting opportunities and has made finding and getting to a place to hunt time consuming and expensive. I grew up in a house out in the middle of the woods in Western Massachusetts. I could walk out my back door and I could be hunting. Now that I live in a suburb of Sacramento, California I have to drive at least an hour to find one of DFG's wildlife areas where hunting is allowed. The hunting is usually poor and many of the areas look like the city dump.

I am 59 years old and I have taken my two sons hunting with me and while they have showed some interest I doubt they will continue to hunt when I am gone. They are like most young people, there are a lot of things they would rather be doing than getting up at 4:00 A.M. to go hunting. My father was from Boston and did not hunt but my maternal grandfather lived in a small town in northern New Hampshire and was an avid hunter, trapper and fisherman his entire life of 89 years and would take my cousins and me out hunting and fishing whenever possible. I inherited his Savage model 99 in .303 Savage that was manufactured in 1908. Young people today do not have someone like my grandfather to introduce them to hunting and mentor them.

I know there are many people that fear they will lose the right to own firearms but I do think that there is little danger of that happening . I am much more concerned about the future of the sport of hunting. Hunting is declining not because of gun control laws but because finding places to hunt is becoming more difficult. That is why as a hunter I financially support groups like Ducks Unlimited that work to provide more habitat and hunting opportunities rather than the NRA and its fixation on the politics of gun control. I do not want to own a gun just for the sake of owning it, I want to be able to hunt with it and that is getting harder all the time.

One of the best posts I've read in a long long time. I decided not to go Turkey hunting this year because of the cost and distance I'd have to go.

Tom
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