Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Firearms Forum > Guns
 Refinishing rifle stock >

Refinishing rifle stock

Guns Like firearms themselves, there's a wide variety of opinions on what's the best gun.

Refinishing rifle stock

Old 10-22-2007, 10:29 PM
  #1  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2
Default Refinishing rifle stock

I have a remington model 7 that I want to refinish. I understand how to prep it for refininshing,but I am hunting advice on how to finish it. I have read about tru oil. Does it shine and how much? Is it a satin finish or can it gloss if enough coats is applied. I also considered staining the stock, can I apply tru oil over the finish? Help and advice is appreciated.
rug2506 is offline  
Old 10-23-2007, 06:09 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Taking the high ground.....
Posts: 277
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

Yes Tru Oil can be applied over stain, VERY dry stain. You might want to reconsider though as Tru Oil nearly always darkens with age.

You can make it gloss, or you can make it satin...personally I can't dig a glossy stock for any reason.

Lots of ways to apply it, some are right, some are wrong, some are easy, some are hard.....sometimes therightest way is the hardest way.

Refinishing:

Strip old finishcompletely, sand down to at least 320 grit, further is better. You can "raise" the grain of the wood with a damp cloth and sand off the "fibers", or burn them off with a torch....but I stopped doing that when I realized it was a wasteof time.Now is the time to fix any problems with the checkering.Apply the first coat by rubbing some in with your bare skin, fingers, whatever...until it becomes "dry" to the touch. Do small patches of the stock so the stuffdoesn't get away from you. Dont let it "build up", use an old tooth brush to "clean it up" in the checkering. Once the whole stock is covered, it'll look like crap, no worries...set it aside to cure for a day or two. Once cured, sand it gently, not going too deep but just enough to smooth it all out again,with the same grit paper you did the final rawsand with...NEVER use steel wool.

Repeat the above, except for the grain raising thing (that's a one time deal),at least four more times, or until you can see with a strong light that the pores of the wood are "filled". When the 5th coat is applied, or when you decide thepores are filled...you put the sand paper away and don't touch it again. From here on out you are doing a "hand rubbed oil finish". At the this point you are starting to see the rewards of your work. The first five coats usually "fill" the grain and leave a smooth surface on which the final finish is applied.

The 6th coat, and beyond, is really quite simple. Slobber the Tru Oil onto the wood, within reason. Take a little care not to get it flooded into the checkering, if you do no big deal just use the tooth brush. Dabbing a little on the checkering with your finger tips and then vigorously working it inwith a toothbrush is all that's needed there.Coat the entire stock with a moderate slobbering of the oil. When, after a few minutes, the oil becomes ever so slightlytacky, use a clean cotton cloth to buff it back off. Buff it off quickly, and completely...until you can handle it and it doesn't feel sticky. Take care not to leave any "lint" stuckon the wood, if your cloth is flannel or some such. This is the crucial step...buffing the finish off. It takes a lot of elbow grease but it's how it's done.

As stated, you won't need to sand again..unless you mess up something, like leave a run or heavy spot, find a pore thats not filled, leave lint on the finish, ect. Tru Oil does not need to be sanded between coats in the final stages.

Take this as far as you want, I go at least thirty coats allowing each one to cure out for a day or two in between. What I end up with is a nice satin fiinish that glows but does not shine...perfectIMHO for a hunting rifle. I don't do glossy.

Once finished and completely cured I coat the stock with several coats of Johnsons paste wax...for water proofing insurance.

I'm sure others have their ways, this is mine and it works for me...........


Wilds is offline  
Old 10-23-2007, 06:17 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Taking the high ground.....
Posts: 277
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

Should add...

Thinning Tru Oil is one way to make it "soak in" better, smooth out easier, and apply quicker....but it also allows microscopic holes to form as the finish dries. This makes the finish worthless with regards to water proofing. Wax is only the insurance, it's not magic.

Apply Tru Oil straight out of the bottle and fear no issues with moisture.........
Wilds is offline  
Old 10-23-2007, 07:41 AM
  #4  
Nontypical Buck
 
stalkingbear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: central Ky
Posts: 2,867
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

Get "custom oil" from brownells and it's spray on. Rub with 0000 steel wool between coats.
stalkingbear is offline  
Old 10-23-2007, 08:08 AM
  #5  
Nontypical Buck
 
Pawildman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: S.W. Pa.-- Heart in North Central Pa. mountains-
Posts: 2,600
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

Tru-Oil is available in spray also. I've used it with good results, but really perfer polyurethane better. You can achieve a gloss finish with either, but I always finish with a satin sheen. Stalkingbear is right---0000 steel wool will produce an excellent finish if used lightly and carefully during the last several finish coats. Agood paste wax will help seal the final surface.
Pawildman is offline  
Old 10-23-2007, 08:28 AM
  #6  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: West Liberty Iowa USA
Posts: 124
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

I would agree with Wilds, should make a good finish. I use Tru Oil quite a bit, I just pour it in my hand and rub it in. I don't put quite that many coats on, but that is up to the individual. I am not a big fan of gloss either, but there again, it's a personal thing. I have a Weatherby that has the classic "Weatherby Gloss", andI like it on that particular rifle.
kirby375 is offline  
Old 10-23-2007, 06:10 PM
  #7  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

I am not a fan of a high gloss finish either, but i wanted to make sure I could get the sheen i want. Is tru oil by it's self going to darken when i apply it or just enhance the color of the wood.
rug2506 is offline  
Old 10-24-2007, 06:08 AM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Taking the high ground.....
Posts: 277
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

It'll do both enhance and darken, the degree isdepending on the wood itself.

If there is "sap" wood in the piece then that will stay lighter than the rest....if it's not stained to "match".

Not every piece of walnut is the same regarding density, predicting the actual color is kinda hard to do.

Generally it will all look good, if the finish is done right....and it will darken to some degree.

The "sheen", and the grain enhancement,come from the number of coats you apply and how diligent you areat rubbing out each coat.

I again warn against using steel wool, it surely does produce a great looking finish...if adequate time is given in between coats.

BUT, it also leaves fibers of steel in the finish that will eventually rust.

Since I produce hunting implements that are used mostly in pretty crappy weather, rain, ice and snow, and more rain....rust prevention is at a premium.

I'm guilty of going all the way down to 800 grit wet/dry paper to get the surface I want instead of usingsteel wool.

Again, the final coats of Tru Oildo not need to be sanded.........................
Wilds is offline  
Old 10-24-2007, 10:49 AM
  #9  
Nontypical Buck
 
stalkingbear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: central Ky
Posts: 2,867
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

The reason I use 0000 steel wool,successfully I may add,is the fact that I DON'T use tru-oil (linseed oil) as it never hardens or cures completely 100%. The finishes I use do harden and steel wool on a completely cured finish coat leaves NO bits or fragments of steel behind. In almost 30 years of being gunsmith,I have experimented with numerous stock finishes. I did eventually discover what I consider the perfect finish. I blend tung oil,eurethane,and epoxy with bonding agent (only way to blend them) and air brush on/steel wool between coats.
I've not had steel wool remaining in finish for about 23-24 years now.


I must add that each coat takes 4 days to cure.
stalkingbear is offline  
Old 10-24-2007, 02:19 PM
  #10  
Nontypical Buck
 
Pawildman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: S.W. Pa.-- Heart in North Central Pa. mountains-
Posts: 2,600
Default RE: Refinishing rifle stock

OK, you stock finishers...How many of you remember Linspeed? If I remember correctly, it was a boiled linseed oil, and you also applied it by hand and hand-rubbed. That stuff took forever to dry!! You spent most of the time getting the pores filled and level. The final finish coats were particularly hard to get right, as it was extremely hard to det a dry coat without some dust getting stuck to the finish somewhere. Where I used the 0000 steel wool was on the final finishes, and only after it was as dry as could be expected. The use of the wool was extremely light pressured, only to lightly dull the previous coat. It often took me a month or more to get a good job.
I think the Tru-Oil of today has a dryer of some sort in it, which really speeds up the drying time, allowing more coats much quicker than the old stuff. As I said before, I'm not afraid of steel wool. You just have to know when and when not to be using it. One more reason I've kinda gone the polyurethane route more lately, although I do have Tru-Oil in the shop too.
Pawildman is offline  

Quick Reply: Refinishing rifle stock


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.