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getting fit for archery.

Old 02-22-2010, 03:20 PM
  #11  
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If you wanna work on using back tension, draw your bow with both hands (RH & LH). You'll learn, real quick, how to use your back muscles.
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Old 02-22-2010, 05:46 PM
  #12  
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Try to shoot the bow year round, curls, seated rows, tricep extensions, and bench press. Good luck Genesis!
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Old 02-23-2010, 07:28 AM
  #13  
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There's no substitute better than the real thing. To start,turn down the weight and practice drawing and holding without actually shooting. Draw,hold, let down. . . draw, hold, let down . . . draw, hold, let down . . . etc. Do 3-4 sets of 10. You will be surprised how quickly you can begin to incrementally crank up the weight. As you get comfortable with each increased weight every week or so, give it another 1/2 turn until you get to the weight you want to use and continue to practice with that weight so you don't lose what you developed.

To SUPPLIMENT that, add in bentover dumbell laterals and a standing version of the same exercise using cables or resistance bands. That, bentover rows and seated rows should have you reaching your goal pretty quickly.
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Old 02-23-2010, 07:48 AM
  #14  
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Look, a 60-70# bow is not overkill. Most of the archers out there today are shooting between 65-70#. It's not like you are trying to pull 125#.

My advice is shoot every other day. I have a Hoyt Trykon at 72 lbs. I can easily pull it back and shoot 100 shots a day. Well at least I could. I just took it out the other day since November when I got my deer. Getting ready for 3-D shooting season. I shot 10 shots and was done. I actually struggled a little bit the first couple of pulls. the best thing to do is shoot every other day, and you will get those muscles built. If need be, crank down the poundage until you can easily pull it, then crank it up just a little. Shoot some more, crank it up a little more, shoot some more....etc until you get the poundage you want.

Also don't know if your wife/parents/landlord will like this, but I put a target in my basement at 7 yards. If I can't get to the range, I shoot in the house. Focusing on my draw, my locking point, my release hand, my bow hand. All the little things you need to get down to make a good shot.
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Old 02-23-2010, 03:57 PM
  #15  
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I heard somewhere that the best test for the proper draw weight is this:

A) Sit on the floor with your legs out in front.
B) Draw back your bow w/o lifting it skyward and draw it back to shooting position.

If you can't do this then you have too much draw weight.
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Old 02-23-2010, 06:17 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by nybuckboy View Post
I heard somewhere that the best test for the proper draw weight is this:

A) Sit on the floor with your legs out in front.
B) Draw back your bow w/o lifting it skyward and draw it back to shooting position.

If you can't do this then you have too much draw weight.
This is a pretty good way to figure things.
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Old 02-23-2010, 07:03 PM
  #17  
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I am with BGfisher, you are shooting a bow that is too heavy for you now. Lower the draw weight and build up those muscles before jumping headlong into a heavy bow. And shoot, shoot, shoot. Shoot several hundred shots per day, it won't be too long before a 70# bow isn't too heavy.
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:02 AM
  #18  
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I work construction (lots of climbing, etc.) also do quite a bit of cycling.

I shoot my Bow year round. Nothing like doing the real thing!

Dan
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Old 02-25-2010, 05:08 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by nybuckboy View Post
I heard somewhere that the best test for the proper draw weight is this:

A) Sit on the floor with your legs out in front.
B) Draw back your bow w/o lifting it skyward and draw it back to shooting position.

If you can't do this then you have too much draw weight.
I can pull 70# easy in that position, but I only shoot 60#. I can shoot it more acurately, slower more controlled draw in all positions, and quite frankly 70# is Not needed on anything I hunt.

The 60# bows I have shot the last couple of years are pushing right at or just over 70# of KE.

I used to hunt with 90#, then went down to 80#, on to 70#, and like I said I now shoot 60# and consistently get passthroughs. My shoulders and elbows wish I had switched to 60# years ago.

Dan
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