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"Killing"

Old 03-15-2007, 11:57 PM
  #51  
TJF
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ORIGINAL: Rogue


As an after thought I will say that I have taken pictures of 380 class bulls and not had the adrenaline courseing through my veins near as much as standing full draw on a spike.

Rogue
I can't say the same... The adrenaline was pumping much more at sneaking in for a 60 and50 yard pictureof these guysthen any spike I've had within bow range. Hunting with a camera has it's perks too while waiting for hunting season!!




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Old 03-16-2007, 12:11 AM
  #52  
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20 -25 yards... well I got within 50 and they closed the distance.

Tim






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Old 03-16-2007, 05:03 AM
  #53  
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I started this thread thinking I'd not NEARLY get this many replies. I'd like to applaud EVERYONE for keeping this thread EXTREMELY civil. It's been a GREAT read, so far.
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Old 03-16-2007, 05:13 AM
  #54  
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I have never felt sorry or remorseful for any animal I've killed.

And I really enjoy the rush that the culmination of the hunt brings me, so yup I guess I enjoy killing?
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Old 03-16-2007, 05:50 AM
  #55  
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Silly me... I was expunging on the feelings of killing...

Killing is a vital to the hunt as an experience. But it is far from being "the" reason we all hunt. I took that as being an entirely different discussion
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Old 03-16-2007, 09:29 AM
  #56  
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To follow up after reading some of these responses...I have killed many a animals (deer/pigs) with a knife to the throat too and that didn't bother me at all either. I didn't get all wound up over it, it was simply business and I wanted to do it quickly to humanely put the animal down.

I went on a pig hunt with a bunch of guys once and there's always"that one guy" in the group who is just a bit "off". Anyways, this guy shot a pig in the rear flank and just left it out there for a few hours for somebody else to go help him out.

Shortly before I caught up with him and heard about this, I had just drilled two hogs with fatal vital zone kill shots. The pigs probably ran 30 yards eachand dropped. They appeared to still be breathing when I got to them so I promptly stepped on their snouts and did what I had to do with my knife. I wasn't squimish or sad but Ididn't relish it. It was simplya necessary part of what I was there to do and I am thankful that my father had taught me long ago ofhow totake care of this properly.

I was DISGUSTED with the other guy leaving that pig out there to suffer and I still think about it from time to time.
These are some really cool responses. I’ve really enjoyed reading through them, but feel I must elaborate on my knife comment, since to me, itwas more than a simple finish toend suffering. Ultimately, it was a life changing experience.

I’ve told this story here before, so if you’ve read it, I apologize for the repeat, and I’ll keep it short, but I think a lot of the story needs to be included to understand my mindset at the time this event took place.

First day of the season, first bow hunt ever, I had my easiest mature buck in sight before first light. It was as easy as calling my dog. The third time I brought him in there was enough light for a good shot, so I took it. The buck turned and ran straight into some really thick green briar and fell down, but almost as if he’d been tripped up. Got up and continued only to fall again, this time I knew, it was a good shot. I could see him where he lay, in the thicket. He attempted to move for a couple of seconds and then laid completely still. I was so excited, I was mixed with all sorts of emotions. I was proud to have built the stand where I did, proud of my practice and good shot (being my first shot at an animal), and happy that it all came together. But I was also a little disappointed at how easily it happened, but would later would realize that this was luck at it’s finest.
After about twenty min of no movement, I decided that he was most likely dead, so I lowered my belongings and followed. I even made some deliberate noise to see if he’d respond, but he didn’t. Once on the ground I attempted to circle the thicket to see if my buck had a cloudy eye, and I was able to get pretty close on a number of attempts, but it was extremely thick, and painful. Being at least somewhat convinced that he had expired I used the only trail into his area, which he’d just created, which still was not easy. Eventually, I made my way to him and was very impressed. He was thick and sturdy, with eight good point. I placed one foot between his front and hind legs and the other at the mid way point of his spine on the ground behind him. Not having touched him, I leaned over him to confirm ole cloudy eye was safe, and just then, he started to stand up! Not knowing what to do, I grabbed his right antler with my left hand and forced my forearm into his neck and twisted it in a manner that would impede his ability to stand up straight, and it seemed to be working, most likely to his injury and not being able to get good traction in the briars and leaves. At this point, time stood still. Nothing else in my life or the world mattered at all, this guy was strong; an obvious worthy challenger. I pulled my knife and slammed it into his throat. He went absolutely berserk, thrashing and flailing like crazy, he was much stronger than any man I’d ever fought or wrestled with, and I was scared. His antlers were coming dangerously close to my face repeatedly, and it was all happening very fast. I wrapped my legs around his belly (scissors/full mount from rear) and fell to my left side in an effort to hold him still and keep him on his side. I felt very trapped in the briars, and knew that letting him go would put him in control of the situation, due to my inability to travel through the briars with any speed, and if he continued to fight instead of exit, well, you know. However, once on the ground I was able to force my knife out the front of his throat. The amount of blood involved at this point assured me that this deer, no matter what took place with the arrow, was now mortally wounded. So I decided to end the fight. I jumped back behind him and pushed him forward, away from me. He ran about 15 feet through the green briar, where he fell again, and subsequently died.
At this point my heart was pounding like never before, I was covered in blood and shaking all over. I was freaked out to say the least. Five min earlier, I was so confident and proud, now I was shocked at myself, I felt that I had just committed murder. This one act shook the psychological foundation I once knew and transformed it into something totally different. As I was reflecting on what had just happened I thought I could remember screaming while I was killing this animal. Not like screaming for help, but more of a murderous scream, one to either intimidate my prey, or to psych myself out, give me confidence or just simple release a serious amount of stored energy. To be honest I’m not sure if I was even screaming, due to my mind set at the time. I can’t help but ponder what it must have been like for the other animal involved – the worst of nightmares turned to reality that day, at least for him. This hunt took another cool twist when another eight pointer walked in to see what was going on, but I’ll spare the details for the sake of this already being long…
I thought a lot about how to make sure I would never be in that position again. A position where antlers are stabbing at you like knives and only stopping a very short distance to your face. Had my forearm broken, I’m sure I’d see the scares of this fight every time I looked in the mirror. I say this because I didn’t realize it at the time, but my forearm ended up with some pretty bad bruising and it hurt for at least a full week afterward.
As if that were not a strange enough situation (for me), it has taken a new twist and my perception of this event continues to change. Of all my experiences in the woods, this one I hold in the highest regard, and it is the one I’d like to relive if given the chance. I’m only sorry that it happened for one reason, and the reason is; now, nothing else compares. The only example that I can think of is comparing watching a hunting show on TV compared to really hunting, but this is at the next level. Now, being in the stand or still hunting is much like TV, its not close enough, and I desire the more personal approach of physical contact. If I could turn back the hands of time, I would only change one thing about the experience. I would not have let him go, to run and die 15 feet away. I would have held on until the end.
I did feel remorse that day, more so than I normally do. I can’t relate to those who don’t feel remorseful for killing a large animal like a deer. I always do. Not to the point that I’m upset about it, but there is that “attending a funeral” feeling to it, for me. That is why I’m so intrigued by this subject. I am longing to commit the same act that I found disturbing, almost like a drug addict needing more, and more. I think it is the complexity and conflict of a lot of natural emotions coming together at one time, which seem at odds, but all have their place in this act. Maybe it is this traffic jamb of emotion that drives us to continue, when we don’t NEED the meat. Do we have addictive personalities? Are we T-type (thrill seekers), which recently have been found to have an underdeveloped part of our brains, much like that of a person who is younger than age twenty-five, and usually male? Is this normal? Of course we cannot define normal for each other, but you know what I mean.
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:05 AM
  #57  
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Hey Killer......

You DO know that most serial killers start out killing the family pet in their teens, ........don't you????

I'm just kidding. Good story.
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Old 03-16-2007, 12:26 PM
  #58  
 
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Great post KP. Great story...
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Old 03-16-2007, 12:27 PM
  #59  
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Killer .... WOW! .... and I thought you were kidding in another post when you said you wanted to wound a deer, chase it down, and kill it with your bare hands.....I'm glad we live in different states ..LOL [8D]
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Old 03-16-2007, 01:01 PM
  #60  
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Wow some read KP..I've had to whack a Turkey in the head With a stick to finish it off and of course many karate chops to the necks of a wounded rabbits..but I'll leave the deer vs knife fights for you!
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