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how to start making my own knifes?

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how to start making my own knifes?

Old 03-03-2011, 07:03 AM
  #11  
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I live along the rr tracks and there is alot of old spikes and plates laying around do yall think they would make decent blades?
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:13 AM
  #12  
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shoulder strap I like the saw blade idea but how did you cut it to shape also do any of you ever use lawn mower blades?
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Old 03-03-2011, 12:54 PM
  #13  
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A word of caution and or advice about using unkown steels.With the exception of alot of old sawmill blades, most circular saw saw type blades are mild steel and will not harden enough to make a good blade.Same goes with most lawnmower blades, old files and railroad spikes.That being said, there are some good steels mixed in there.If you are using a file look for old Nicholson Black Diamond Files, they work very well and will harden great, but be careful of modern files and any unmarked files as most are just case hardened and will not hold an edge.If you are looking for railroad spikes look for the ones marked "HC" as they are high carbon and will work fine.If you are not sure, try hardening it and do a file and spark test before going any farther.
After 40 years of working with steels and 20 years of making knives, I have found it is better to buy some good steel and not mess with the unknowns.1095,1080, 1084 and 5160 are all relatively cheap and HT easy with 1095 being the most tricky.Dave
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:16 PM
  #14  
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DC that is some incredible work on your web site.I appreciate your advice and answering some of my questions.If I were going to use a saw blade which right now looks like my best option.How would I cut it to form will a sawz all work or a ban saw maybe.I have hundreds of deer antlers laying around and it is currently shed hunting season.I would love to make a deer antler handled knife.
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Old 03-04-2011, 06:38 AM
  #15  
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If your blade is hardened a sawzall or bandsaw won't touch it, the steel would have to be annealed (basically heating to critical and slow cooling)first.In the hardened state, the best way I have found to cut is using an abrasive disc either on a Dremel or angle grinder.Even with that you will blue the edge somewhat( meaning you lose some hardness) so cool often and cut a little outside the line and then grind back to your line when getting ready to start your bevels.
That is why I suggested buying good steel and why it's cheaper in the long run.My blade steel comes annealed and cuts easily on my metal bandsaw then after grinding I HT it and I have control over how it's HTed.Dave
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Old 03-04-2011, 10:41 AM
  #16  
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Dave again thankyou for answering my ?.I can see there is alot more to the process than I thought.I'm thinking that I will need to do some research on the subject.Are there any how two websites you can recommend?
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:34 AM
  #17  
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Yep, heat treating is a science of its own, and virtually every steel has different temps and parameters.Although not just a How-to site but a knife Forum that will cover all of your questions.Come on over.Dave
http://knifedogs.com/forum.php
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Old 03-07-2011, 01:22 PM
  #18  
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Dave, those are some beautiful knives and leatherwork you do. Each winter I entertain myself making a few knives from purchased blades, and cob together a sheath for them. You truly inspire me to try my hand at something fancier. I give all my blades away, so I have to wait until I see a blade that inspires me and I figure a friend would enjoy, and go from there. I certainly will try some leather inlaying. Thanks.
Dave
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Old 03-07-2011, 09:20 PM
  #19  
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Thanks and good for you.I started out about twenty years ago doing purchased blades and did that for about a year before starting my own blades.It's a great hobby or a living.I don't know if you saw on my website ,that I have a tutorial on inlays under"Knife Info".If I can help let me know.Dave
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